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Surgical Products Daily

Preventing SSI: It Starts In The Prep

June 2, 2010 7:32 am | by Amanda McGowan | Articles | Comments

Surgical site infections (SSIs), and the human and monetary costs associated with these events, is a top concern for facilities across the country. While it’s important that a facility follows best practice approaches to infection prevention throughout the perioperative process, ensuring all efforts are made in the preoperative preparation period to prevent infection can help start every surgical case off on the right foot.

Shorter Doctor-Trainee Hours Alone Not Solution

June 2, 2010 7:31 am | by Kevin Pho | Articles | Comments

SAGES Issues New Practice Guideline

June 2, 2010 7:31 am | News | Comments

The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) issues a practice guideline addressing the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. June 2, 2010 BARRX Medical Inc. reports that the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) has issued a new practice guideline for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

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Quitting Smoking Promotes Better Healing After Surgery

June 2, 2010 7:30 am | News | Comments

A study finds patients who avoid tobacco for six weeks after fracture surgery have fewer postoperative complications June 2, 2010 Smokers who refrain from using tobacco during the six-week period following emergency surgery for an acute fracture heal more quickly and experience fewer complications than patients who continue to smoke during the healing process, according to a study published in the June 2010 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS).

Craigslist Ad Delivers Kidney Donation

June 2, 2010 7:29 am | by Stephanie Innes, AP | News | Comments

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Diane White had been living without any kidneys for three months and had been on a transplant waiting list for more than four years when she received a call about a potential donor. Weak and tired from spending nine hours a week in dialysis, White had begun praying more than usual.

Supreme Court To Hear Military Wrongful Death

June 2, 2010 7:29 am | News | Comments

A woman whose husband died after undergoing a botched surgical procedure was expected to take her medical malpractice/wrongful death case to the Supreme Court. However, the lawsuit was by no means a simple one, based on reports provided by ABC7 News I-Team. Dean Witt, the plaintiff’s late husband, was a staff sergeant at Travis Air Force Base.

High-Tech Births Or Nature's Way?

June 2, 2010 7:28 am | by Story by Josephine Marcotty, Minneapolis Star Tribune | News | Comments

Dannette Lund wanted to have her second baby the natural way, but she had to flout all the best medical advice to do it. Because she had delivered her first child by Caesarean section, a hospital birth would almost certainly mean surgery again. Home birth? Her midwife refused, saying it was too risky.

Hospital Wins Transplant-Cancer Lawsuit

June 1, 2010 7:57 am | News | Comments

Jennifer Peltz, AP A prominent organ-transplant hospital wasn't to blame for the death of a man who became riddled with cancer after getting a kidney from a donor who unknowingly had uterine cancer, jurors have found. The Queens jury found for NYU Langone Medical Center in the medical malpractice case surrounding Vincent Liew's 2002 death.

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Sugary Band-Aid May Help Post-Op Healing

June 1, 2010 7:41 am | News | Comments

A compound found in sunless tanning spray may help to heal wounds following surgery, according to new results published by plastic surgeons from New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City and biomedical engineers at Cornell University, where it was developed. Procedures to remove cancerous breast tissue, for example, often leave a hollow space that fills with seroma fluid that must typically be drained by a temporary implanted drain.

Who Pays For Medical Complications?

June 1, 2010 7:36 am | by Pauline W. Chen, MD | Articles | Comments

One afternoon during my surgical training, I received a call from an intern, a first-year doctor-in-training; she wanted me to place a central line, a specialized catheter inserted in a major vein for intravenous access. Because of the patient’s previous procedures, I would have to put his line in the subclavian vein, a vessel that courses along the top of the chest, precariously close to the lungs.

Make The Most Of Your Surgical Instrument Purchasing Process

June 1, 2010 7:35 am | Articles | Comments

Today, surgical departments face increasing pressure to say compliant with instrument processing standards set forth by major accreditation agencies. Often, facilities need to buy more instruments to meet these standards, yet are challenged by budget constraints, lack of support from their surgical instrument providers and increasingly complex instruments.

“Green” Patient Safety Solution

June 1, 2010 7:35 am | Product Releases | Comments

Sandel is now offering their biodegradable TIME OUT Beacon™ sterile through all direct and distribution channels.  The New Non-Woven TIME OUT Beacon™ provides hospitals with a cost-effective tool to increase patient safety and reduce the risk of wrong-site, wrong-procedure and wrong-patient surgery.

New Tonsillectomy Techniques Reduce Complications

June 1, 2010 7:28 am | News | Comments

In a review of three different surgical techniques commonly used for tonsillectomy, the microdebrider technique (where a rotary cutting tool is used to shave tissue) had the lowest overall complication rate when compared to the other two techniques. The results are shown in new research published in the June issue of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery .

Refusing Cancer Surgery Lowers Survival Rates

June 1, 2010 7:11 am | News | Comments

Men who refuse surgery for prostate cancer and instead opt for monitoring progression without undergoing treatment have a significantly worse long-term survival rate than those patients that choose radiotherapy, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study found that patients who refused any treatment for their prostate cancer had a 10-year overall survival rate of 51 percent, compared to 68 percent for those who chose radiation treatment.

Surgery The Solution For Enlarged Prostate Glands

June 1, 2010 7:00 am | News | Comments

Medications, laser treatment and surgery can all arrest the growth of an enlarged prostate gland, but only surgery can produce an improvement in symptoms, particularly a reduction in incontinence, researchers say. The procedure, transurethral resection of the prostate, or TURP, is generally reserved for those who have failed to respond to drug treatment or who cannot tolerate the medications.

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