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Surgical Products Daily

Best Practices For Managing A Nursing Shortages

July 2, 2010 6:50 am | News | Comments

API Healthcare recently issued a set of best practices to help hospitals of all sizes effectively prepare for and manage the challenging repercussions of healthcare reform legislation. Industry experts expect this legislation to generate millions of new patients, create a severe nursing shortage and have a significant financial impact on hospitals and other healthcare providers.

The Risks Of Remote-Controlled Medicine 

July 2, 2010 6:42 am | by By: Dr. Wes | Articles | Comments

Increasingly our Western world culture assumes that most things in medicine can be reduced to a linear, data-driven, algorithmic process. One only needs to witness the now-famously heralded article on ICU check-lists to understand the unwavering trust we have in this model. ICU medicine's complexity reinforces our trust in this approach because patients are usually too sick to contribute to their care.

Living, Breathing Human Lung-On-A-Chip

July 2, 2010 6:41 am | Product Releases | Comments

Researchers have created a device that mimics a living, breathing human lung on a microchip. It could be used as a potential drug-testing alternative July 2, 2010 Researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital Boston have created a device that mimics a living, breathing human lung on a microchip.

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Intravascular Temperature Technology

July 2, 2010 6:41 am | Zoll Medical Corp. | Product Releases | Comments

ZOLL’s Intravascular Temperature Management (IVTM™) technology is used to regulate the core body temperature by precisely cooling and warming critically ill and surgical patients suffering from a variety of medical conditions. According to the company, the technology provides cooling and warming from a catheter inserted into the patient’s vein.

Reusable Trocar With Thermoplastic Handle

July 2, 2010 6:40 am | Product Releases | Comments

GMD Inc. introduces a reusable trocar with a thermoplastic handle. The medical instrument, which is used to implant GMD’s Universal Sling™ for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence, is made of 20 percent glass-filled Udel® GF-120 polysulfone (PSU) resin from Solvay Advanced Polymers, LLC for strong chemical resistance, low shrinkage, and excellent autoclave resistance (a minimum of 50 cycles).

Vitagel Surgical Hemostat

July 2, 2010 6:38 am | Orthovita | Product Releases | Comments

Vitagel Surgical Hemostat is a FDA approved Class III medical device used to control bleeding and facilitate healing while utilizing the patient's own biology. Vitagel is the only product of its kind to combine microfibrillar collagen and thrombin in combination with the patient's own plasma (fibrinogen and platelets).

Isolating The Genes That Extend Life

July 2, 2010 6:35 am | News | Comments

Randolph E. Schmid, AP The oldest among us seem to have chosen their parents well. Researchers closing in on the impact of family versus lifestyle find most people who live to 100 or older share some helpful genes. But don't give up on diet and exercise just yet. In an early step to understanding the pathways that lead to surviving into old age, researchers report in the online edition of Science that a study of centenarians found most had a number of genetic variations in common.

Overhaul May Mean Longer ER Wait

July 2, 2010 6:20 am | News | Comments

Carla K. Johnson, AP Emergency rooms, the only choice for patients who can't find care elsewhere, may grow even more crowded with longer wait times under the nation's new health law. That might come as a surprise to those who thought getting 32 million more people covered by health insurance would ease ER crowding.

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Johns Hopkins Formula Could Improve Kidney Transplant Procedures

July 2, 2010 5:52 am | News | Comments

Only a small fraction of transplant centers nationwide are willing to accept and transplant deceased-donor kidneys that they perceive as less than perfect, leading to lengthy, organ-damaging delays as officials use a one-by-one approach to find a willing taker. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have designed a formula they say can predict which donor kidneys are most likely to be caught in that process, a method that could potentially stop thousands of usable kidneys each year from being discarded because it took too long for them to be transplanted.

More Than 2 Billion Lack Surgical Access

July 2, 2010 5:37 am | News | Comments

More than two billion people worldwide do not have adequate access to surgical treatment, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). A substantial amount of the global burden of disease comes from illnesses and disorders that require surgery, such as complicated childbirth, cancer and injuries from road accidents.

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Study Finds New Element To Corneal Transplant Success

July 2, 2010 5:15 am | News | Comments

Although it is already one of medicine's most successful transplant procedures, doctors continue to seek ways to improve corneal transplants. Now, for the first time, a team of German and British researchers have confirmed that failure and rejection of transplanted corneas are more likely in patients whose eyes exhibit abnormal vessel growth, called corneal neovascularization, prior to surgery.

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Stem-Cell Therapy Offers New Approach To Fighting Infection

July 2, 2010 5:02 am | News | Comments

A new study from researchers in Ottawa and Toronto suggests that a commonly used type of bone marrow stem cell may be able to help treat sepsis. The study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine , shows that these cells can triple survival rates in an experimental model of sepsis.

Demo: SPIDER Surgery Gallbladder Removal

July 1, 2010 7:41 am | Videos | Comments

SPIDER Surgery is enabled by an advanced, minimally-invasive surgical system. The system in introduced into the abdomen through a single, small incision. Once inside the abdomen, the system opens up to perform the surgery. After the surgery is complete, the system closes and is removed from the same small incision.

Surgery Stops Seizures

July 1, 2010 7:41 am | Videos | Comments

Ask Dr. Manny Show: Jennifer Flores would have up to 100 seizures a day. Her life was miserable until doctors performed a rare surgery to stop her seizures.

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