Advertisement
The OR’s Leading Source of Cutting Edge Surgical Technology
Subscribe to Surgical Products All

The Lead

Simulator Focuses On Pre-Op Motor Skills

July 7, 2014 10:54 am | by CBS News | Videos | Comments

Virtual surgery simulators are being used to help surgeons hone the motor skills they will need in an operating room. This new technology is changing the way doctors prepare for surgery...                           

TOPICS:
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Surgical Products Daily

VA Apologizes To Whistleblowers Facing Retaliation

July 9, 2014 8:03 am | by Matthew Daly, AP | Blogs | Comments

James Tuchschmidt, the No. 2 official at the Veterans Health Administration, apologized on behalf of the department. "I apologize to everyone whose voice has been stifled. That's not what I stand for. I'm very disillusioned and sickened by all of this."

TOPICS:

Hand Hygiene Improves 3X When Auditors Are Present

July 9, 2014 7:50 am | Articles | Comments

The study examined the Hawthorne effect, also known as observation bias (the tendency of people to change their behavior when they are aware of an observer) using an electronic monitoring hand hygiene system in real-time. Ultrasound "tags" on soap dispensers transmitted a signal to a nearby receiver each time the levers were pushed, and a time-stamped hand hygiene wash was recorded.

TOPICS:

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38 Million After Faking Results

July 9, 2014 7:37 am | by David Pitt, AP | News | Comments

The team, which consists of 10 researchers, has sufficient funding to continue its work, but experts at federal agencies have stated that it can take two to five years to recover from the negative perceptions created by a misconduct incident. The team's lead researcher was not aware of faked lab work.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Hospital Pharmacist Charged In Theft Of Pills

July 8, 2014 7:46 pm | by Jennifer Peltz, AP | News | Comments

Prosecutors are still investigating what became of the drugs, but believe the medications ended up on the thriving black market for prescription narcotics where the more than 193,000 missing pills could fetch a total of about $5.6 million.

TOPICS:

Benefit To Removing Gall Bladder For Suspected Common Duct Stone

July 8, 2014 7:38 pm | News | Comments

Among patients with possible common duct stones, removal of the gall bladder, compared with endoscopic assessment of the common duct followed by gall bladder removal, resulted in a shorter length of hospital stay without increased illness and fewer common duct examinations.

TOPICS:

MIS Underused Despite Lower Complication Rates

July 8, 2014 7:32 pm | News | Comments

Minimally invasive surgery has been associated with better outcomes than open surgery, including fewer surgical site infections, less pain and shorter hospital stays. However, analysis shows that some hospitals capable of performing minimally invasive surgery aren't providing it as often as they could.

TOPICS:

Patent-Pending Tomosynthesis for Breast Cancer Radiography

July 8, 2014 1:04 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Kubtec recently announced its development of TomoSpec, a tomosynthesis technology for digital specimen radiography of excised breast tissue.  The company’s patent-pending technology allows for multi-planar x-ray imaging for thorough margin analysis of excised breast tissue.

TOPICS:

Study Targets Impact Of Health Insurance Expansion on Surgery

July 8, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

Insurance expansion was associated with a 9.3 percent increase in discretionary surgery in Massachusetts and a 4.5 percent decrease in non-discretionary surgery. Authors estimate the ACA could yield an additional 465,934 discretionary surgical procedures by 2017.

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Pace Of Surgical Innovation Concerns Some Surgeons

July 8, 2014 12:44 pm | Articles | Comments

In 2005, patients were twice as likely to experience an adverse event if they were undergoing minimally invasive robotic prostatectomies compared to a traditional open surgical procedure. The following year was considered the tipping point for the adoption of MIRP when it equaled or exceeded 10 percent of all cases.

TOPICS:

New Porous Technology for Total Knee Arthroplasty

July 8, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

The new porous technology for total knee arthroplasty offers surgeons a new implant coating that uses a lattice developed through layers of irregular shaped beads, resulting in an increased average pore size and greater porosity than traditional spherical beads.

TOPICS:

Hospital Settles After "Brutal" ER Patient Search

July 8, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

The lawsuit, which carried a $1.1 million settlement, said the woman, a U.S. citizen, was "brutally" searched by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents in December 2012 after being selected for additional screening at the Cordova Bridge in El Paso when a drug sniffing dog jumped on her.

TOPICS:

Partial Knee Replacements Safer, But Require More Follow-Up

July 8, 2014 11:14 am | News | Comments

Because of the higher revision rate of partial knee replacement surgery, which is traditionally regarded as the most important factor to determine the choice of implant, its use in the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis is controversial, with only about 7,000 being performed annually.

TOPICS:

Sutures Or Staples? The Best Choice For Closing A C-Section

July 7, 2014 11:18 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

In the largest study to date comparing sutures (stitches) versus surgical staples for closing a C-section, researchers found a 57 percent decrease in wound complications in women who were sutured versus those who received staples...               

TOPICS:

Young, Active War Wounded Pushing Medical Science

July 7, 2014 9:42 am | by Julie Watson, Associated Press | News | Comments

The blood is not the most jarring part of the photograph taken shortly after the bomb blew off Marine Gunnery Sgt. Brian Meyer's leg and hand. It's his smile. The bomb technician had asked a team member to take the picture. He knew his defiance in the face of death would keep his comrades going and ease the torment caused by what they had witnessed...

TOPICS:

Personalized Brain Tumor Vaccine Helps Patients Live Longer

July 7, 2014 9:22 am | by Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

Patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and treated with an experimental cancer vaccine made from the patient's own tumor lived longer. Typically, newly diagnosed patients undergo surgery to remove their tumor followed by radiation and temozolomide, an oral chemotherapy drug.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading