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Surgical Products Daily

Second Skin

October 4, 2010 7:52 am | by Amanda McGowan | Comments

The hands are one of, if not the, most important surgical tool. Protecting them with the right surgical glove is necessary for patient and staff safety, as well as a procedure’s overall success. October 5, 2010 Infection control and patient and staff safety standards demand surgical team members to don gloves for protection against bloodborne pathogens and other infection risks.

Purchasing Fluid Waste Products

October 4, 2010 6:55 am | Multisorb Technologies | Comments

Russell D’Anna Business Development Leader, Spill Control Multisorb Technologies, Inc. www.multisorb.com October 4, 2010 There are several key points to remember when purchasing fluid waste control products to prevent occupational exposure when capturing the bio-waste inside of OR unit suction canisters.

The Day That Medicine Broke Her And Destroyed Her Innocence

October 4, 2010 6:54 am | by Jordan Grumet, MD | Comments

I was a third-year medical student in the first week of my obstetrics rotation. The obstetrics program was known to be high-pressure, its residents among the best. Mostly women, they were a hard-core group–smart, efficient, motivated–and they scared the heck out of us medical students.

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Paying Doctors For Patient Performance

October 1, 2010 6:51 am | by Pauline W. Chen, MD | Comments

Not long ago, a fellow doctor told me that his local health care insurers, in an effort to improve care and rein in costs, had been evaluating physicians and paying them according to their “quality ranking.” With “pay for performance” reimbursement, doctors who had, for example, managed more timely follow-up and achieved better test results with their diabetic or hypertensive patients would rank more highly and earn more in financial bonuses than physicians whose patients failed to meet the insurers’ guidelines.

Prevent Infection And Keep Staff Safe

October 1, 2010 6:51 am | by Kathy Sheerin Vice President of Marketing, Flagship Surgical, LLC www.flagshipsurgical.com | Flagship Surgical, Llc | Comments

What should surgical professionals consider when purchasing fluid waste control products to ensure infection control and staff safety in the OR? October 1, 2010 The two biggest concerns in every OR are the prevention of infection and the safety of the workers.

Fluid Waste Management In The OR

September 28, 2010 8:27 am | Comments

Mary Hannon, Aspen Surgical Director of Marketing Falls are a leading cause of work-related injuries and deaths.  The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 235,419 falls occurred in 2009, with an estimated 579 of those falls resulting in fatality.

Our Health Care Happy Meal

September 28, 2010 8:26 am | by Dr. Wes | Comments

Parents the world over know the magic of McDonald's Happy Meals. There's something about the promise of a Happy Meal -- the way it's packaged, the free toy -- young families and especially kids find them irresistible. But anyone who's purchased one of these knows the reality: that toys within the Happy Meal are typically played with for no more than three minutes and the plastic tchotchkes are discarded faster than the accompanying 2% milk.

LED-ing The Way

September 24, 2010 12:41 pm | by Amanda McGowan, editor | Comments

LED usage and advanced technology continues to shine in the OR. September 27, 2010 Since their introduction to the surgical market in 2007, light emitting diode (LED) surgical lighting has seen dramatic growth in the operating room. According to Joey Knight, Vice President of Sales at MAQUET Surgical Workplaces, in the approximately three years since LEDs have been available as lighting options for the surgical suite, the technology has claimed more than 50 percent of the market from the previous halogen technology, and projections for the future say that growth will only continue.

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Does A Stereotypical Surgical Personality Exist?

September 24, 2010 6:37 am | by Shawn Vuong | Comments

Recently, our class learned and practiced how to correctly ’scrub’ for surgery. During this little lab activity, we were all gowned up and washing our hands when a couple of classmates asked if I was going to be a surgeon. I said I didn’t really know yet, although I did find surgery pretty fascinating.

Friend Request

September 22, 2010 6:49 am | by Daniela Lamas | Comments

Last winter, in the middle of my intern year, I became Facebook friends with a young man who was dying in the intensive-care unit. An investment banker in his mid-20s, he thought he was healthy until a fluttering in his chest and swollen ankles took him to a doctor. Now he was in the I.C.U. with a rare cardiac condition and the vague possibility of a transplant.

Managing Fluid Waste

September 22, 2010 6:49 am | Bemis Health Care | Comments

Managing infectious fluid waste in the OR is a major concern for both patients and healthcare professionals. Fluid must be contained properly and disposed of safely to protect the staff and comply with the facility’s infection control policy. A fluid waste management system should be safe and efficient but still provide the user the ability to manage volume loss.

Orthopedic Surgeons Changing Lives In Vietnam

September 21, 2010 7:21 am | Comments

This year marks the 9th Annual Surgical Outreach Project to Vietnam by members of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). Since the first project in 2002, the AOFAS surgeons have transformed the lives of more than 600 Vietnamese children and adults with lower extremity deformities and disabilities through corrective surgery.

Harder Than Doing Something

September 21, 2010 7:21 am | by Bruce Campbell, MD | Comments

“Are you giving up on me?” My patient looks at me severely. “There must be other treatment options! Aren’t there some experimental drugs out there? I have beaten this cancer twice before. Are you saying that I can’t beat it again?”     No one can ever know with absolute certainty whether my patient's newly recurrent cancer might miraculously disappear with one more treatment.

Teaching Doctors About Nutrition and Diet

September 20, 2010 7:13 am | by Pauline W. Chen, MD | Comments

Within days of being accepted into medical school, I started getting asked for medical advice. Even my closest friends, who should have known better, got in on the action. “Should I take vitamins?” “What do you think of this diet?” “Is yogurt good for me or not?” Each and every time someone posed such a query, I became immediately cognizant of one thing: the big blank space in my brain.

World’s First Transcontinental Anesthesia

September 17, 2010 7:27 am | Comments

Videoconferences may be known for putting people to sleep, but never like this. Dr. Thomas Hemmerling and his team of McGill’s Department of Anesthesia achieved a world first on August 30, 2010, when they treated patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in Italy remotely from Montreal.

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