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Surgical Products Daily

Olympic Swimmer Undergoes Cutting Edge Knee Procedure

November 17, 2010 4:49 am | by Michele R. Berman, MD | Comments

Olympic swimmer Dara Torres, who has won 12 medals in five Olympic games, including 3 silver medals at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, has recently undergone a cutting edge procedure on her knee to repair severe arthritis. The 43-year-old was  the oldest swimmer on the U.S. Olympic swim team, but has won at least one medal in each of the five Olympics in which she has competed, making her one of only a handful of Olympians to earn medals in five different Games.

A Patient Is Rescued, Quietly

November 16, 2010 5:11 am | by Theresa Brown, RN | Comments

From watching television we tend to think we know what a hospital emergency looks like: violent, dramatic and optimally bloody. Someone calls the alarm, a team that includes at least one handsome doctor surges into the room, and people yell out “STAT!” as needed. The patient always survives.

Drowning In A Sea Of Health Complaints

November 15, 2010 5:54 am | by Danielle Ofri, MD | Comments

The patient was a classic “worried-well” type of patient — a thin, 50-year-old educated woman with a long litany of nonspecific, unrelated complaints and tight worry lines carved into her face. She unfolded a sheet of paper on that Thursday morning in my office with a brisk snap, and my heart sank as I saw 30 lines of hand-printed concerns.

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Preventing Surgical Site Infection

November 12, 2010 5:54 am | by Terry Coggins, MSN, RN, WOCN, CWCN, Medical Education Manager, Smith & Nephew | Smith & Nephew, Inc. | Comments

Terry Coggins, MSN, RN, WOCN, CWCN Medical Education Manager, Smith & Nephew One of the biggest concerns in hospitals today is related to surgical site infections. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there are an estimated 780,000 operations every year that are complicated by surgical site infections.

Doctor Patient

November 10, 2010 5:52 am | by Dr. Rob | Comments

I did a little “self care” earlier this week.  I did it by not caring for myself. I went to the doctor. I was sitting in the waiting area for my appointment and saw the mother of one of my patients.  ”Why are you here?” she asked. “I have a doctor’s appointment.

A History Of Wound Closure

November 10, 2010 5:50 am | by Marty Weisberg, Medical Director, Ethicon, Inc., www.ethicon.com | Ethicon, Inc. | Comments

When the very first surgeries were performed, wound closure wasn’t an issue.  The surgeons often left the incisions open with the hope that they would close by themselves over time.  Scarring was rarely a problem because these very first patients often didn’t survive the post-operative period, usually as a result of infection.

Doctors In The House – And Senate

November 9, 2010 5:36 am | by Marianne Mattera | Comments

  [Last] Tuesday's election brought us what I think must be a record number of physicians in Congress – 19. I haven't done my own retrospective analysis, but I did find a nice little piece of research from Johns Hopkins that found a total of only 25 physicians in the House or Senate in all the years from 1960 to 2004.

A New Threat

November 8, 2010 5:32 am | by ShadowFax | Comments

I wish I could say that every patient encounter worked out well, that all my patients went home happy and satisfied.   It would be nice, but unfortunately that is not true at all.   There are many patients who present with unrealistic expectations or an agenda which is non-therapeutic and I am relatively straightforward and unapologetic about correcting patient's misconceptions about the care that is or is not appropriate in the ED.

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What Do Surgeons Want?

November 8, 2010 5:30 am | by Craig Johnson MD, Associated Professor of Plastic Surgery, Consultant, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery and Department of  General Surgery, Mayo Clinic | Comments

Since the origins of surgery many millennia ago, the goal of caring for a wound was simply healing. As the complexity of surgical procedures evolved, the same realistic outcome remained the same, that being a strong, stable closure that yields a long term, pain free, infection resistant closure.

The Patient’s Side Of Lifesaving Treatments

November 5, 2010 5:32 am | by Pauline W. Chen, MD | Comments

Wiry, fair-haired and in his 60s, the patient had received a prostate cancer diagnosis a year earlier. When his doctors told him that surgery and radiation therapy were equally effective and that it was up to him to decide, he chose radiation with little hesitation. But one afternoon a month after completing his treatment, the patient was shocked to see red urine collecting in the urinal.

Another Perspective On Retained Objects

November 5, 2010 5:32 am | Comments

The following is a short interview conducted at the recent American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress with Christopher Rupp, MD, Assistant Professor for Surgery and Co-Director, Center for Pancreatic and Biliary Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

If There’s A Doctor On Board, Please Ring Your Call Button!

November 3, 2010 6:59 am | by Bob Wachter, MD | Comments

Barbed Suture For Wound Closure And Healing

November 3, 2010 6:59 am | by Amy E. Pollack, MD, MPH Global Medical Director for Covidien in the Soft Tissue Franchise | Covidien | Comments

I think it’s clear when you look at the history of wound closure that we’ve made huge strides in terms of defining, developing and changing utilization for suture in the last couple of decades. One of the great achievements more recently has been the exploration of barbed suture.

What Would You Do If You Had A Year Left To Live?

November 2, 2010 5:05 am | by Susan Biali, MD | Comments

Though I’ve spoken about breast cancer for Susan G. Komen for the Cure (emphasizing the importance of early screening and detection), until recently I had never had a mammogram. In my training I’d been taught that mammograms weren’t that accurate or useful in women under 40 (our health system’s protocols reflect that), so I got regularly checked by my physician whenever I had a physical and otherwise was waiting until I was older to get testing.

Achieve Positive Outcomes With Wound Closure

November 2, 2010 5:03 am | by Wendy Booker, Director, Marketing, Adhezion Biomedical, LLC, www.adhezion.com | Comments

Surgeons want to be confident, efficient and safe when closing incisions to provide the best healing results.  The following factors are instrumental in closing a wound: Strength - First and foremost, a wound closure device must keep the wound closed.  Both the surgeon and the patient want to leave the O.

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