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President Obama Nominates New Health And Human Services Secretary

April 12, 2014 | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press | Comments

Sylvia Mathews Burwell, nominated to run "Obamacare," would bring a wealth of expertise in economics and government management to one of Washington's toughest jobs, even though she has little direct experience in the healthcare industry...

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Scientists Employ 3D Printer To Build Human Heart

April 10, 2014 9:54 am | by Dylan Lovan, Associated Press | Comments

It may sound far-fetched, but scientists are attempting to build a human heart with a 3D printer. Ultimately, the goal is to create a new heart for a patient with their own cells that could be transplanted. It is an ambitious project to first, make a heart and then get it to work in a patient, and it could be years — perhaps decades — before a 3D printed heart would ever be put in a person...

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Surgically-Implanted Electrical Device Helps Paralyzed Men Move Legs

April 9, 2014 10:34 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | Comments

Three years ago, doctors reported that zapping a paralyzed man's spinal cord with electricity allowed him to stand and move his legs. Now they've done the same with three other patients, suggesting their original success was no fluke. Experts say it's a promising development but warn that the experimental treatment isn't a cure. When the implanted device is activated, the men can wiggle their toes, lift their legs, and stand briefly...

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Florida Lawmakers Look To Expand, Regulate Telehealth

April 9, 2014 10:00 am | by Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press | Comments

The calls may come in the middle of the night and from hospitals more than an hour away. Someone is having a stroke and is en route an emergency room in the Florida Keys, but there aren't any neurologists on call. Within 15 minutes, a neurologist pops onto a computer screen and can order an IV drug. It's that sort of potentially life-saving technology that may drive down healthcare costs, while also addressing serious doctor shortages...

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Mercury Rising: Temperature Management Roundtable

April 8, 2014 10:05 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Comments

Experts from four companies that provide temperature management products discuss the technology that allows clinicians to keep themselves and their patients safe and comfortable...                      

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Scientists Hard At Work Creating Body Parts In Lab

April 8, 2014 9:33 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | Comments

In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears, and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells. It is among several labs around the world, including in the U.S., that are working on the futuristic idea of growing custom-made organs in the lab...

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New Type Of Battery-Powered Defibrillator Keeps Hearts Going

April 7, 2014 10:29 am | by Jennifer R. Lloyd, San Antonio Express-News | Comments

With a weak heart muscle and heart valve problems, Ruben Rivera said he was apprehensive about having a new type of battery-powered defibrillator implanted under his skin that could shock his heart if it sensed an irregular rhythm. But the 62-year-old San Antonio resident has no regrets since becoming the first patient here to undergo the procedure late last month...

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Victim In Famous Boston Bombing Photo Marks Year Since Marathon

April 7, 2014 10:24 am | by Michelle R. Smith, Associated Press | Comments

The year since Jeff Bauman was pushed in a wheelchair from the Boston Marathon, his legs ravaged and his face ashen, has been marked by pain and difficulty but also by triumphs: He's learned to walk on new prosthetic legs, he's gotten engaged, and he's an expectant father...

In The Line Of Sight: Evaluating Imaging Technology

April 7, 2014 10:02 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Comments

Recent estimates indicate more than 65 percent of surgical procedures utilize minimally invasive techniques and this percentage is only expected to increase with time. This statistic supports the widely-held belief among industry experts that the imaging technology that best allows the surgical team to see exactly what is happening inside the patient without opening will be preferred by all hospitals...

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Point Of Impact: Talking Sharps Safety And Needlestick Prevention

April 7, 2014 9:47 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Comments

The numbers don’t lie. The sharps injury rate in surgical settings has increased in the 14 years since the passage of the federal Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000. While the rate of injury has dropped approximately 31.6 percent in non-surgical settings, it has increased about 6.5 percent in the operating room. Why?

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Research Respondents Recognize Supply Chain Deficiencies Keeping Hospital ORs In The 'Stone Age'

April 4, 2014 9:57 am | Comments

Despite the fact the healthcare industry is fueled by scientific advancement, too many hospitals find themselves stalled at a crossroads, struggling to embrace business-focused technologies and best practices that will allow them to flourish in the decades to come. This is the troubling picture painted by results of a new independent survey released by GHX...

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Test Accurately Rules Out Heart Attacks In The ER

April 3, 2014 9:58 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | Comments

A simple test appears very good at ruling out heart attacks in people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, a big public health issue and a huge worry for patients. A large study in Sweden found that the blood test plus the usual electrocardiogram of the heartbeat were 99 percent accurate at showing which patients could safely be sent home rather than be admitted for observation and more diagnostics...

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Health Leaders On Drug Co. Boards; A Conflict?

April 2, 2014 9:43 am | by Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer | Comments

Leaders of many U.S. academic medical centers sit on the boards of some of the world's biggest drug companies, which a study suggests raises the potential for worrisome conflicts of interest. Industry board members oversee company decision-making and have a financial responsibility to company shareholders, the study authors note...

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IBM’s Watson Takes On Brain Cancer

March 28, 2014 2:57 pm | by IBM | Comments

IBM's Watson cognitive computing system will be designed to analyze the genomic data from a small group of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive and malignant brain cancers. Also the most common type of brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma kills more than 13,000 Americans each year...

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2014 Surgical Expansion Survey

March 28, 2014 1:37 pm | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Comments

There are more than 7,500 hospitals in the United States today, and based on exclusive findings from two recent surveys of the Surgical Products readership, about half of them have experienced a construction project at their facility during the last three years and a little more than a third are in the midst of an expansion effort right now...

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Practicing In A Post-ACA World

March 28, 2014 1:18 pm | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Comments

The debate is over... The Affordable Care Act is law and the effects of the controversial, landmark legislation are beginning to take shape. Now all that’s left for the hospitals to do is react accordingly...       

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