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Surgical Products Daily

Research Shows Promise for New Nerve Repair Technique

August 11, 2014 11:25 am | Comments

A multicenter study including University of Kentucky researchers found that a new nerve repair technique yields better results and fewer side effects than other existing techniques. Participants with nerve injuries were randomized into either conduit or allograft repair groups. Following the surgeries, independent blind observers performed standardized assessments at set time points to determine the degree of sensory or motor recovery.

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New Study Sheds Light on Emergency Gallbladder Removal

August 11, 2014 11:05 am | Comments

A new Mayo Clinic study found that 1 in 5 patients who went to the emergency room with gallbladder pain and were sent home to schedule surgery returned to the ER within 30 days needing emergency gallbladder removal. The surgical complication rate rises with the time lag before surgery, the researchers say.

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Study Shows Tool Effective in Evaluating Doctor's Bedside Manner

August 11, 2014 10:49 am | Comments

According to the study, nearly 90 percent of residents who were surveyed on the effectiveness of the tool thought that the scenarios reflected the reality of what they would encounter in general practice, and more than 80 percent agreed that it would help them prepare for their final exam.

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Stem Cells Show Promise for Stroke in Pilot Study

August 8, 2014 12:11 pm | Comments

A stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients' bone marrow has shown promising results in the first trial of its kind in humans. Four out of five patients had the most severe type of stroke: only four percent of people who experience this kind of stroke are expected to be alive and independent six months later. In the trial, all four of these patients were alive and three were independent after six months.

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Grafted Stem Cells Show Dramatic Growth in Rat Spinal Cord Injuries

August 8, 2014 11:59 am | Comments

Scientists report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals' central nervous system. Scientist Paul Lu, PhD, said the axons extended through the white matter of the injury sites, frequently penetrating adjacent gray matter to form synapses with rat neurons.

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Study: Laparoscopic Surgical Gallbladder Removal Safe for Children

August 8, 2014 11:40 am | Comments

A recent study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers recommends laparoscopic cholecystectomies (surgical removal of the gallbladder) for pediatric patients suffering from gallstones and other gallbladder diseases. The study analyzed 202 cases of laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed on children below 18 years of age between the years 1990 and 2010.

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Disposable Biosensor May Help Determine Which Patients Can Be Fed After Surgery

August 8, 2014 11:22 am | Comments

A disposal, plastic listening device that attaches to the abdomen may help doctors definitively determine which post-operative patients should be fed and which should not, an invention that may improve outcomes, decrease healthcare costs and shorten hospital stays. If successful the device could also be used to help diagnose irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, in addition to helping obese people lose weight.

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Judge Tosses Suit Claiming Botched Circumcision

August 8, 2014 11:06 am | Comments

A judge threw out a lawsuit filed by an Alabama man who claims a botched circumcision resulted in the amputation of his penis, ruling Thursday that the complaint wasn't specific under state malpractice law. Johnny Lee Banks Jr., 59, has numerous health problems including diabetes that have led to the amputation of his legs. Attorneys for the doctors and hospital contend the medical procedure alleged in the suit never happened.

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Cell Mechanics May Prove Vital in Cancer Behavior

August 7, 2014 12:00 pm | Comments

Cancer cells that break away from tumors to go looking for a new home may prefer to settle into a soft bed, according to new findings from researchers at the University of Illinois. Some particularly enterprising cancer cells can cause a cancer to spread to other organs, called metastasis, or evade treatment to resurface after a patient is thought to be in remission.

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Study: Cell Regulation Gene Causes Kidney Cancer in Children

August 7, 2014 11:40 am | Comments

Mutations in a gene that helps regulate when genes are switched on and off in cells have been found to cause rare cases of Wilms tumor, the most common kidney cancer occurring in children. The researchers studied the genes of 35 families with more than one case of Wilms tumor, recruited to the study through a network of collaborators from across the world.

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ConforMIS' Knee Implant Boasts Strong Results in Studies

August 7, 2014 11:23 am | Comments

ConforMIS, a medical device company providing the only truly customized total knee implant systems for patients, today announced results from two in vivo clinical studies comparing the motion patterns of patients treated with ConforMIS’ iTotal® versus off-the-shelf knee implants. The studies involved the first-ever use of an advanced real-time mobile x-ray fluoroscopy system designed to measure a wider range of natural movements.

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FDA Approves ORBACTIV for Skin Structure Infections

August 7, 2014 10:52 am | Comments

ORBACTIV is the first and only antibiotic approved by FDA to treat ABSSSIs with a single, once-only administration. “Today’s FDA approval of ORBACTIV represents an important advance beyond the current standard of care for bacterial skin and skin structure infections,” said Clive Meanwell, MD, PhD, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Medicines Company.

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New Device Could Change Melanoma Treatment

August 6, 2014 12:34 pm | Comments

A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and incidence rates are rising faster than those of any other cancer. It's also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths.

Patients Look to Priceline Model for Affordable Surgery

August 6, 2014 12:23 pm | Comments

An online medical auction site called Medibid, which largely operates outside the confines of traditional health insurance, offers consumers a chance to bid on healthcare. The 4-year-old online service links patients seeking nonemergency care with doctors and facilities that offer it, much the way Priceline unites travelers and hotels.

Safety Net Sought in Tumor Growth After Stem Cell Transplantation

August 6, 2014 12:09 pm | Comments

Recent studies have shown that transplanting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iPS-NSCs) can promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents and non-human primates. However, a serious drawback to the transplantation of iPS-NSCs is the potential for tumor growth, or tumorogenesis, post-transplantation.

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