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Surgical Products Daily

New Non-Surgical Treatment For Pediatric Neuroblastoma

April 30, 2012 6:25 am | Comments

(PRNewswire-USNewswire) A nationwide study led by Dr. Jed Nuchtern, chief of the division of pediatric surgery at Texas Children's Hospital and professor of surgery at Baylor College of Medicine, found that the majority of infants with a particular form of neuroblastoma - a childhood tumor that often requires intensive chemotherapy and surgery - excel in their overall progress and survival when the tumor is monitored without surgical resection.

Kidney Transplanted Twice in Two Weeks

April 27, 2012 5:39 am | Comments

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- For the first time,a kidney that had been donated to a patient in need was removed and implanted into a new patient, the third individual to have the organ, after it failed in the first transplant recipient. Ray Fearing, a 27-year-old Arlington Heights resident received the organ from his sister, Cera, after a long battle with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a disease in which scar tissue develops on the part of the kidney that filters waste out of the blood, ultimately causing kidney failure.

Atrial Fibrillation Should Be Treated When Performing Cardiac Surgery

April 27, 2012 4:56 am | Comments

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A recent study conducted by Northwestern Medicine@ researchers published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, reveals that patients with an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (A-fib) who are undergoing cardiac surgery, have a lower long-term survival rate compared with patients who are in sinus rhythm, which is the normal beating of the heart.

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Atrial Fibrillation Should Be Surgically Treated When Performing Cardiac Surgery

April 27, 2012 4:55 am | Comments

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A recent study conducted by Northwestern Medicine@ researchers published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, reveals that patients with an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (A-fib) who are undergoing cardiac surgery, have a lower long-term survival rate compared with patients who are in sinus rhythm, which is the normal beating of the heart.

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CEO Charged With Overbilling For Spinal Implants

April 27, 2012 4:49 am | Comments

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Prosecutors say a San Francisco-based firm drastically overbilled taxpayers for government employee spinal implants. Santa Clara County prosecutors filed fraud charges on Wednesday against 67-year-old Implantium chief Trudy Maurer and the firm's 39-year-old medical director Tigram Shahsuvarya.

Titleholder Of Longest With Bullet In Head Dies

April 27, 2012 4:45 am | Comments

TURLOCK, Calif. (AP) — The man who holds the Guinness World Record for living the longest with a bullet in his head has died in Central California at age 103. The Modesto Bee reports that William Lawlis Pace died in his sleep at a Turlock nursing home Monday — 94 years and six months after his older brother accidentally shot him with their father's .

Rebates From Healthcare Law Will Top $1 Billion

April 27, 2012 4:40 am | Comments

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 3 million health insurance policyholders and thousands of employers will share $1.3 billion in rebates this year, thanks to President Barack Obama's health care law, a nonpartisan research group said Thursday. The rebates should average $127 for the people who get them, and Democrats are hoping they'll send an election-year message that Obama's much-criticized health care overhaul is starting to pay dividends for consumers.

Outpatient Surgery Patients At Risk For Dangerous Blood Clots

April 25, 2012 6:25 am | Comments

A University of Michigan Health System study examined who’s having outpatient surgery in the U.S. today, and showed 1 in 84 highest-risk patients suffers a dangerous blood clot after surgery. Hospitalized patients are often warned of the possibility of venous thromboembolism, which include blood clots that can form in the veins and travel to the lungs.

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Laparoscopy Reduces The Risk Of Small-Bowel Obstruction

April 25, 2012 6:20 am | Comments

In many cases, the surgical technique is the most important factor when it comes to adhesive small-bowel obstruction, even when taking factors such as age, previous operations and other health conditions into account. This is shown by a study carried out at the University of Gothenburg's Sahlgrenska Academy, which reviewed 108,141 operations carried out in Sweden between 2002 and 2004.

Brain Surgery For Epilepsy Underutilized

April 25, 2012 6:16 am | Comments

Ten years ago, a landmark clinical trial in Canada demonstrated the unequivocal effectiveness of brain surgeries for treating uncontrolled epilepsy, but since then the procedure has not been widely adopted—in fact, it is dramatically underutilized according to a new study from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Blood Transfusions Overused And May Do More Harm Than Good

April 25, 2012 6:10 am | Comments

Citing the lack of clear guidelines for ordering blood transfusions during surgery, Johns Hopkins researchers say a new study confirms there is still wide variation in the use of transfusions and frequent use of transfused blood in patients who don't need it. The resulting overuse of blood is problematic, the researchers say, because blood is a scarce and expensive resource and because recent studies have shown that surgical patients do no better, and may do worse, if given transfusions prematurely or unnecessarily.

Surgery-Seeking Travelers Flock To Emerging Countries For Cosmetic Procedures

April 25, 2012 6:05 am | Comments

LONDON, UK (GlobalData) - The blooming medical tourism market in BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) offering affordable cosmetic surgeries for patients across the world, is leading to increased profits for wound care device companies, according to a new report by medical intelligence company GlobalData.

Extreme Hospital Bills Lead To Sticker Shock

April 24, 2012 8:00 am | Comments

CHICAGO (AP) — What do hospitals charge to remove an appendix? The startling answer is that it could be the same as the price of a refrigerator — or a house. It's a common, straightforward operation, so you might expect charges to be similar no matter where the surgery takes place. Yet a California study found huge disparities in patients' bills — $1,500 to $180,000, with an average of $33,000.

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Hematology Research Identifies Promising Areas for Scientific Discovery

April 24, 2012 7:55 am | Comments

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Society of Hematology (ASH), the world's largest professional society committed to the study and treatment of blood disorders, today issued a report urging federal agencies to coordinate hematology research funding around seven specific high-need areas that would produce the greatest impact and translate into improvements in patient care in the United States.

Teen Receives Life-Saving Rare Heart-Liver Transplant

April 24, 2012 7:46 am | Comments

/PRNewswire/ -- Children's Hospital of Wisconsin recently performed a rare double organ transplant to save the life of Thomas Castillo, a 15-year-old Illinois boy with complex congenital heart disease and liver failure. A multidisciplinary team at Children's Hospital replaced Castillo's two organs during a 17-hour surgery.

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