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Surgical Products Daily

Octomom's Fertility Doctor Works To Keep License

June 22, 2011 6:47 am | Comments

Shaya Tayefe Mohajer, AP The fertility doctor who helped Nadya Suleman become the mother of 14 children through repeated in-vitro treatments is asking that he be allowed to continue practicing medicine while he appeals his license revocation. Dr. Michael Kamrava asked a Los Angeles Superior Court judge to delay a decision that revokes his license to practice medicine as of July 1.

New AMA President

June 22, 2011 6:41 am | Comments

(AP) — A pediatric neurosurgeon from Newark, N.J. is the new president of the American Medical Association. Dr. Peter Carmel officially began his yearlong term Tuesday afternoon during the AMA's annual meeting in Chicago. He is 74. He'll lead the nation's largest doctors' group at a tumultuous time for physicians.

Cancer, Heart Disease Deaths On The Rise

June 22, 2011 6:36 am | Comments

Edith M. Lederer, AP Nearly two-thirds of deaths in the world are caused by non-communicable diseases such as cancer, diabetes and heart and lung disease which are rapidly increasing at a cost to the global economy of trillions of dollars, according to U.N. estimates and preliminary results of a new study.

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Blood Clot Risk In Colorectal Surgery Greater With Open Approach

June 21, 2011 5:59 am | Comments

The risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) may be nearly twice as high for patients undergoing open surgery for colorectal problems, versus those undergoing laparoscopic colorectal (LC) resections, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Surgery , one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

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Evaluating Tonsillectomy Techniques

June 21, 2011 5:52 am | Comments

A review of tonsillectomy technique studies found that some new methods have advantages over traditional methods, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery , one of the JAMA/Archives journals. As background information, the article states that tonsillectomy is well established in terms of safety, but is often accompanied by pain, postsurgical bleeding, and a prolonged recovery.

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Doctors Shortchanged By Insurer Mistakes

June 21, 2011 5:37 am | Comments

(AP) — The nation's largest doctors' group says about one in five payments of medical claims by commercial health insurers is inaccurate, shortchanging physicians. The American Medical Association released its annual report card on insurers Monday. The AMA says eliminating mistakes would save doctors and insurers $17 billion a year.

National Library Of Medicine Launches MedlinePlus Connect

June 21, 2011 5:26 am | Comments

The National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has formally launched MedlinePlus Connect. This free service allows health organizations and health information technology (HIT) providers to link patient portals and electronic health record systems to MedlinePlus.

UN Says More Midwives Could Save Millions

June 20, 2011 6:10 am | Comments

Donna Bryson, AP More and better trained midwives could help save millions of lives in many countries with high death rates among newborns and women giving birth, the United Nations said Monday. "We have now realized that there is a huge potential in the hands of the midwives that was not being exploited," stated Vincent Fauveau, a doctor who coordinated a U.

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First Prosthetic Bypass Graft With Stem Cells At Point Of Care

June 20, 2011 5:50 am | Comments

The first three patients to undergo an investigational surgical procedure for peripheral vascular disease that involves the patient's own stem cells continue to do well, reports the University of Louisville surgeon who is the principal investigator. The "TGI-PVG IDE" clinical trial involves using a patient's own stem cells to line man-made bypass grafts to better the chances at saving the limbs of patients with peripheral artery disease.

Genetics Linked To Success Of Leg Bypass Surgery

June 20, 2011 5:29 am | Comments

Outcomes of bypass surgery to repair blocked arteries in the legs tend to be better in the roughly one-in-five people who have inherited a specific genetic variation from both parents, according to a study presented at the late-breaking clinical trials session of the Vascular Annual Meeting in Chicago this past weekend.

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Study Proves Importance Of Post Gastric Bypass Care

June 20, 2011 5:14 am | Comments

(PRNewswire) Each year more than 200,000 people with morbid obesity undergo gastric bypass surgery, but research shows that more than half of patients regain at least 20 percent of the weight lost. To help gastric bypass patients realize the full health benefits of the procedure, researchers at Wake Forest University have launched a new study to prove that the follow-up care patients receive is just as critical as the weight loss surgery itself.

Study: Gastric Bypass Alleviates Migraine Headaches

June 17, 2011 2:49 pm | Comments

Bariatric surgery can lead to total or partial alleviation of migraines in nearly 90 percent of morbidly obese patients diagnosed with migraine headaches, according to a new study* presented here at the 28th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS).

Outpatient Bariatric Surgery May Lead To Higher Mortality, Complications

June 17, 2011 2:49 pm | Comments

A new study of nearly 52,000 patients found that people who had gastric bypass surgery and were discharged from the hospital sooner than the national average of a two-day length of stay, experienced significantly higher rates of 30-day mortality and complications. The findings* were presented here at the 28th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS).

How Far Should Hospitals Go To Treat Obese Patients?

June 17, 2011 2:48 pm | by WhiteCoat, MD | Comments

Boston Emergency Medical Services recently debuted an ambulance with a mini-crane and reinforced stretcher to transport patients weighing up to 850 pounds. It cost $12,000 to retrofit the ambulance. My problem is this: I think we need to do our best to provide medical care to all patients.

Patient Safety Risks Outside Hospital Walls

June 17, 2011 6:23 am | Comments

Ever since the Institute of Medicine issued its landmark report "To Err Is Human" in 1999, significant attention has been paid to improving patient safety in hospitals nationwide. However, a high number of adverse events, including major injury and even death, occur in private physician offices and outpatient clinics as well.

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