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Surgical Products Daily

Surgery Deaths Could Lead To Prison Time For Device Execs

June 8, 2011 5:43 am | Comments

Maryclaire Dale, AP By 2003, surgeons trained by a Pennsylvania medical-device company had seen serious complications from an unauthorized test of a bone-cement product. The cement had been approved to treat broken bones, but not weight-bearing hips and spines. Yet Synthes, Inc. officials forged ahead with their own tests, teaching doctors how to use it for fractures in places not approved by federal regulators.

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Study Examines Impact Of Massachusetts Laws On The ER

June 7, 2011 5:56 am | Comments

While overall emergency department use in Massachusetts continues to rise, the number of low-severity visits dropped slightly since the implementation of the state's healthcare reform law, according to an Annals of Emergency Medicine study published online. "Our study suggests other factors play a role in determining access to care and use of the ED in addition to one's insurance status," writes Peter Smulowitz, MD, MPH, the study's lead author and an emergency physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Joint Replacement Surgery Riskier At Low-Volume Hospitals

June 7, 2011 5:44 am | Comments

Patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee arthroplasty at hospitals with lower surgical volume had a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and mortality following the procedure. The complications following joint replacement surgery at low-volume sites may be reduced by modifying systems and procedures used before and after surgery according to the findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatism , a peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

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Doctors Can't Ask About Guns In Florida

June 7, 2011 5:32 am | Comments

(AP) — The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence is suing to overturn Florida's new law that bans doctors from asking patients about gun ownership. The center filed the suit in a Miami federal court on behalf of three doctors and three physicians groups. They claim the law violates doctors' First Amendment rights to provide patients with information and advice on how to reduce risks from firearms.

Nearly 100 New Cases In German E. Coli Outbreak

June 7, 2011 5:26 am | Comments

(AP) — Germany's national disease control center says a further 94 people have been sickened by the deadliest E.coli outbreak in modern history. The Robert Koch Institute said the number of registered infections in Germany rose to 2,325 Tuesday, with those in other European countries still standing at about 100.

Bariatric Patients At Increased Risk For Bone Fractures

June 6, 2011 6:36 am | Comments

People who have had gastric bypass surgery or other bariatric weight-loss surgery have an even higher increased risk of breaking bones. These study findings will be presented Tuesday at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting in Boston. "A negative effect on bone health that may increase the risk of fractures is an important consideration for people considering bariatric surgery and those who have undergone bariatric surgery," said lead author Kelly Nakamura, a medical student at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, MN.

Weight Loss After Gastric Bypass Reduces Expression Of Alzheimer's

June 6, 2011 6:14 am | Comments

Obesity is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, and weight loss due to bariatric surgery may reduce the risk of this common dementia, a new study suggests. The results were presented at The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting in Boston. "Our study shows for the first time that weight loss resulting from bariatric surgery leads to a reduction in the expression of genes related to Alzheimer's disease," said the study's main author, Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, professor at State University of New York at Buffalo.

Man Cited After Paying Medical Bill With 2,500 Pennies

June 6, 2011 5:49 am | Comments

(AP) — A Utah man has been cited on a charge of disorderly conduct after paying for a disputed medical bill with 2,500 pennies. The Deseret News of Salt Lake City reports Jason West went to Basin Clinic in Vernal on May 27 prepared to dispute an outstanding $25 bill. Assistant Vernal Police Chief Keith Campbell says that after asking staff members whether they accepted cash, West dumped 2,500 pennies on the counter and demanded that staff count them.

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E.Coli Patient Describes Hospital Chaos

June 6, 2011 5:45 am | Comments

Kirsten Grieshaber, AP Nicoletta Pabst could not believe what she saw 12 days ago when she rushed to a Hamburg hospital with stomach cramps, diarrhea and blood in her stool. The emergency room at the University Medical Center in Hamburg-Eppendorf was engulfed by chaos, she said, overwhelmed as it tried to treat hordes of E.

E.Coli Patient Describes Hospital Chao

June 6, 2011 5:42 am | Comments

Kirsten Grieshaber, AP Nicoletta Pabst could not believe what she saw 12 days ago when she rushed to a Hamburg hospital with stomach cramps, diarrhea and blood in her stool. The emergency room at the University Medical Center in Hamburg-Eppendorf was engulfed by chaos, she said, overwhelmed as it tried to treat hordes of E.

Fighting Cancer with Cancer

June 6, 2011 5:29 am | Comments

A mutant gene long thought to accelerate tumor growth in thyroid cancer patients actually inhibits the spread of malignant cells, showing promise for novel cancer therapies, a Mayo Clinic study has found.

And The Winner Is ...

June 3, 2011 7:03 am | Comments

Action Products recently announed that their Nurse Angel of 2011 is Shirley Pollard Ramsay, DNP, APRN, CRNFA. “Action is proud to honor such a deserving nurse,” stated Mistie Witt, president of Action Products, Inc., Medical Products Group. Shirley started out as a Vet Tech, but was spending more time with the owners than her animal patients.

Not All Hospitals Post-Ops Treat Elderly The Same

June 3, 2011 6:54 am | Comments

Hospitals that provide quality care for young people do not always provide the same quality care for the elderly, a new study has found. As our population ages and requires more healthcare, hospitals need to measure the quality of care they provide for the over 65 age group and implement programs to meet their distinct needs, said the study's author, Dr.

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Paper Workarounds And Communication Breakdowns Pose IT Challenges And Improvements

June 3, 2011 6:47 am | Comments

A new research study investigates the challenges that pen and paper workarounds or computerized communication breakdowns pose to the use of electronic health records. Understanding these challenges may lead to improved coordination of care supported by health IT. Focusing on referrals by primary care physicians to specialists and communications from the specialists back to the referring physician, Paper Persistence, Workarounds, and Communication Breakdowns in Computerized Consultation Management appears in the July 2011 issue of the International Journal of Medical Informatics .

Fewer Deaths During High-Risk Surgeries

June 3, 2011 6:31 am | Comments

Surgery death rates have dropped nationwide over the past decade, according to a University of Michigan Health System study that reveals cancer surgeries have seen the most dramatic improvement in safety. The U-M study in this week's New England Journal of Medicine shows surgery mortality dropped substantially for eight different high-risk surgeries performed on 3.

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