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Surgical Products Daily

Reducing Misplaced Pedicle Screws In Spine Surgery

September 16, 2011 6:17 am | Comments

SpineGuard announced today that the third published clinical study of its FDA-cleared and CE-marked PediGuard platform for enhanced pedicle screw placement has concluded that “the use of PediGuard significantly reduced the incidence of clinically relevant misplaced screws, thereby increasing the safety of pedicle screw implantation.

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Serb Claims Son, Nephew Are Human Magnets

September 16, 2011 6:02 am | Comments

Jovana Gec, AP Two small boys from a central Serbian town are able to attract metal objects, acting much like human magnets, says the mother of one of them. Sanja Petrovic, the mother of four-year-old David, said it first came to her attention about a month ago. "I asked him to fetch me a spoon so I cold feed his little brother, and he yelled back: 'Mom, it sticks!,'" Petrovic recalled.

Inhaler Overuse May Have Killed Future Surgeon

September 14, 2011 6:18 am | Comments

(AP) — A 19-year-old Colorado State University student may have died because she inadvertently used her asthma inhaler too much the evening of her death, doctors said. A candlelight vigil was held at the school for Sascha Franzel, of Honolulu, on Monday following her burial in Commerce City.

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Michigan To Require Pediatric BMI Reports

September 14, 2011 6:05 am | Comments

Kathy Barks Hoffman, AP Governor Rick Snyder plans to direct doctors in Michigan to begin monitoring the body weight of their young patients and provide the data to a state registry in one of the most extensive government efforts to address the growing problem of pediatric obesity, the Associated Press has learned.

Deal Struck For Woman Who Lost Job After Donating Kidney To Son

September 14, 2011 5:46 am | Comments

(AP) — A Philadelphia woman who lost her job after taking time off to donate a kidney to her son has been offered a deal that could allow her to work for the business again. Officials at the aircraft repair training company tell WTXF-TV that Claudia Rendon will be paid her normal salary until another position opens up at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance.

UN Says Medical Waste Risks Ignored

September 14, 2011 5:39 am | Comments

John Heilprin, AP A U.N. human rights investigator says up to a quarter of the world's trash from hospitals, clinics, labs, blood banks and mortuaries is hazardous and much more needs to be done to regulate it. Calin Georgescu says few nations are developing the rules needed to cope with the growing mountains of medical waste that pose a hidden risk of infection and could expose people to low levels of radioactivity and needle-stick injuries.

RF Surgical Secures Additional Funding

September 13, 2011 6:20 am | Comments

BUSINESS WIRE - RF Surgical Systems, Inc., a leader in the prevention and detection of retained surgical items (RSI), today announced the closing of a $12 million round of fundraising led by new investor Split Rock Partners, a venture capital firm focused on emerging healthcare, software and internet services companies.

Costs, Mortality Increase Following Cardiac Device Infections

September 13, 2011 6:14 am | Comments

A new study finds that infections following cardiac device implantations or replacement result in extremely high costs, both financially and in terms of patient mortality, even months after affected patients return home. Infections associated with pacemakers and defibrillators led to 4.8 to 7.

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Older Pills Often Safer

September 13, 2011 5:59 am | Comments

Carla K. Johnson, AP Many consumers mistakenly believe new prescription drugs are always safer than those with long track records, and that only extremely effective drugs without major side effects win government approval, according to a new study. A national survey of nearly 3,000 adults finds that about four in 10 wrongly believe the U.

Part-Time Surgeons Could Help Address Shortage

September 13, 2011 5:50 am | Comments

More part-time employment for surgeons, particularly retiring older male or young female surgeons taking time off for their families, may considerably reduce the surgeon shortage in the United States by 2030, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons .

Gastric Bypass Reduces Blood Pressure

September 12, 2011 6:10 am | Comments

The kidneys play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure by adjusting the production of urine after eating or drinking. This process begins already in the upper digestive tract, which could explain why gastric bypass surgery for obesity also markedly reduces blood pressure, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.

New Lung Cancer Treatment Company Receives Funding

September 12, 2011 6:00 am | Comments

GLOBE NEWSWIRE - superDimension, Ltd., a privately-owned company that develops minimally invasive interventional pulmonology devices, today announced it has closed on an aggregate $11 million in equity financing. The round was funded by existing investors with the addition of Covidien Ventures. "We are pleased that our investors have shown such strong commitment to superDimension and our minimally invasive interventional pulmonology technology," said Daniel J.

Hospital Privacy Breach Puts Data Online

September 12, 2011 5:53 am | Comments

(AP) — Stanford Hospital in California is blaming a subcontractor used by an outside vendor for a privacy breach that led to the online posting of medical information for thousands of emergency room patients. The breach was first reported Friday by the New York Times. The data of 20,000 patients, including names and diagnosis codes, remained on a commercial website for nearly a year until it was discovered last month and taken down, according to the newspaper.

IBM Putting Watson To Work In Health Insurance

September 12, 2011 5:41 am | Comments

Jim Fitzgerald, AP Enough with the fun and games. Watson is going to work. IBM's supercomputer system, best known for trouncing the world's best Jeopardy! players on TV, is being tapped by one of the nation's largest health insurers to help diagnose medical problems and authorize treatments.

Combination Therapy Helps Combat Implanted Device Infections

September 9, 2011 6:07 am | Comments

Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a therapy for a potentially deadly type of infection common in catheters, artificial joints and other in-dwelling medical devices. Their findings appear in the Open Access Journal PLoS Pathogens . The therapy targets fungal infections, which are hard to treat in such devices because they are composed of biofilms—complex groupings of cells that attach to surfaces.

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