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Surgical Products Daily

Project Access Helps Uninsured Get Needed Surgeries

October 22, 2010 6:28 am | Comments

Approximately 40 people without health insurance and in desperate need of outpatient procedures will receive free medical procedures through Project Access San Diego, a project of the San Diego County Medical Society Foundation. The procedures will be performed in partnership with Kaiser Permanente San Diego at the Otay Mesa facility on Saturday, October 23.

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Couple Sues After Mega Death Sauce Hospitalizes Son

October 22, 2010 6:21 am | Comments

(AP) Some don't like it hot. A Steak 'n Shake restaurant in Cleveland, TN was sued by a couple who claimed it served a hot sauce that sent their son to the hospital. Tim and Mary Katherine Gann said a restaurant server gave their minor child a bottle of Blair's Mega Death Sauce for his chili and encouraged him to eat some.

European Surgeon Tabs SPIDER For Single-Incision Gall Bladder, Hernia Operations

October 22, 2010 6:17 am | Comments

The TransEnterix SPIDER® Surgical System, a platform that allows for operating through a patient’s belly button, has received regulatory approval to market in the European Union. With this approval in place, Professor Helmut G. Weiss, a respected expert in minimally invasive surgical techniques, used the SPIDER system to remove the gallbladders of two patients, repair an inguinal hernia in a third patient, and perform a colorectal procedure in a fourth.

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Changing The Face Of Orthopaedic Surgery

October 22, 2010 6:07 am | Comments

At Loyola University Health Systems, 20 percent of orthopaedic faculty and 16 percent of orthopaedic residents are women. And at Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine, six of the 11 fourth-year students applying for orthopaedic residencies are women. Among podiatrists, two of the five attending and two of the seven residents are women.

St. Johns Mercy Medical Wins 3M Innovation Award

October 22, 2010 5:57 am | Comments

With a video depicting an infection prevention biathlon, St. John’s Mercy Medical Center in St. Louis received more than 10,000 votes and was named the winner of the 3M Innovation Award. The contest invited healthcare facilities across the country to showcase original ways of improving patient care and helping to reduce the risk for healthcare-associated infections through video or written submissions.

Needlestick Safety Frustrations Continue

October 20, 2010 7:24 am | Comments

With Infection Prevention Week and the upcoming 10-year anniversary of the signing of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, AORN (Association of periOperative Registered Nurses) recently unveiled a study focusing on some frustrations regarding a lack of progress in implementing the strategies outlined in the Act.

McSleepy Meets DaVinci

October 20, 2010 7:09 am | Comments

In a world first, a completely robotic surgery and anesthesia was recently performed at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC). The DaVinci surgical robot was first put to work this summer in the hospital, whereas the anesthesia robot, nicknamed McSleepy, has been providing automated anesthesia since 2008.

OR Teamwork Programs Appear To Reduce Surgical Fatalities

October 20, 2010 7:01 am | Comments

Hospitals that had operating room personnel participate in a medical team training program that incorporates practices of aviation crews, such as training in teamwork and communication, had a lower rate of surgical deaths compared to hospitals that did not participate in the program, according to a study in the October 20 issue of JAMA .

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New Hospital Ratings Reflect Declining Mortality Rates

October 20, 2010 6:52 am | Comments

A new independent study by HealthGrades of patient outcomes at America's hospitals found that patients at 5-star rated hospitals had a 72 percent lower risk of dying when compared with patients at 1-star-rated hospitals - an enormous gap that has held steady over the past years even as overall mortality rates have improved.

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Cardinal Invites Providers TO Apply For $1 Million In Grants

October 20, 2010 6:44 am | Comments

The Cardinal Health Foundation today announced that, for the fourth consecutive year, it will award more than $1 million in grant funding to help U.S. hospitals, health systems and community health clinics improve the efficiency and quality of care. Earlier this year, the Cardinal Health Foundation awarded grants to 40 organizations in 25 states as part of its E3 Grant Program, which was launched in 2008 to improve the effectiveness, efficiency and excellence of health care, nationwide.

Doctors Help Miners During Pressured Rescue

October 19, 2010 7:13 am | Comments

When rescuers needed to determine how to safely extract Chilean miners without their fainting and suffering a potentially devastating loss of blood to the brain, they turned to a UT Southwestern Medical Center scientist whose expertise typically is focused on astronauts in space, not mine workers trapped underground.

Pre-Op Psychiatric Illness Associated With Increased Risk Of Death

October 19, 2010 5:30 am | Comments

Individuals with co-occurring psychiatric illnesses, especially anxiety and depression, appear to have an increased risk of death within 30 days of surgery, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Psychiatric illnesses occur along with physical complaints in an estimated five to 40 percent of hospitalized patients, according to background information in the article.

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Patients Protest Chinese Doctor's Risky Surgery

October 19, 2010 5:17 am | Comments

Gillian Wong, AP At one moment, the Chinese urologist seemed to be at the height of his career. He had invented a surgical procedure to help patients overcome incontinence and was training doctors in America and elsewhere. The next, Dr. Xiao Chuanguo was in handcuffs, confessing that he'd hired thugs to attack two persistent critics who called him a fraud.

Study Examines How Surgical Mistakes Continue

October 19, 2010 5:07 am | Comments

Catherine Tsai, AP Three healthy men had their prostate glands removed. Five people had surgery on the wrong part of their spines. A child underwent an unneeded ear operation after the wrong person was called to go to the operating room. Despite efforts to end surgical errors, doctors are still reporting operations performed on the wrong body parts and even the wrong people, a study released Monday said.

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Man With Scorched Face Awaits Face Transplant

October 19, 2010 4:58 am | Comments

Jamie Stengle, AP Dallas C. Wiens wants to be able to smile, to smell the rain, to feel his 3-year-old daughter's kisses. Two years ago, Wiens' face was burned away in a horrible electrical accident that also left him blind. Although doctors were able to transfer skin and muscle from Wiens' back and thighs onto his charred skull, he still doesn't have lips, a nose or even eyebrows.

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