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Surgical Products Daily

Cancer Risk From Radiation May Have Been Overestimated

December 1, 2010 4:19 am | Comments

The risk of developing radiation-induced cancer from computed tomography (CT) may be lower than previously thought, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Radiation from medical imaging has gotten a tremendous amount of attention in recent years," said Aabed Meer, an M.

InnerSpace Offering Lean Strategies Course

December 1, 2010 4:05 am | Comments

Stanley InnerSpace, a leader in storage and inventory solutions for the healthcare industry, is offering healthcare professionals a lean strategies course to earn 2.0 general nursing contact hours. Titled Using Lean Strategies to Reduce Supply Costs , the self-study course book is available for download on the Stanley InnerSpace website.

Making Hospital Surgery Infection Rates Public

November 30, 2010 9:20 am | Comments

The Washington State Hospital Association is releasing hospital-specific surgical infection rate data. This is the first time this information has been made public. The website at www.wahospitalquality.org provides data on infections following three important types of surgeries: cardiac, orthopedic, and hysterectomies.

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Study: Mammography Not Enough For Some Women

November 30, 2010 6:04 am | Comments

Women with a personal history of breast cancer should consider annual screening with MRI in addition to mammography, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines currently recommend annual screening with breast MRI in women with a known gene mutation or with a strong family history indicating a lifetime risk of breast cancer greater than 20 percent.

Wristband Combines Medical Data With Multimedia

November 30, 2010 5:54 am | Comments

MEDICOM Technologies, Inc. has introduced a multimedia-enabled interactive Medical I.D. Wristband that can display an individual's complete medical history to emergency treatment personnel in critical situations. The patent-pending MEDICOM Medical I.D. Wristband also boasts an array of audio, video and voice-driven health and entertainment features.

Using A Patient's Own Blood To Treat Hamstring Injury

November 30, 2010 5:37 am | Comments

Researchers in London say they have found an effective two-part treatment for microtears in the hamstring. The process involves injections of the patient's own blood and a steroid, along with "dry-needling," in which repeated needle punctures cause controlled internal bleeding in the injured area.

Surgeon-Physician Marriages Place Stress On Careers, Emotional Health

November 30, 2010 5:14 am | Comments

Surgeons married to physicians face more challenges in balancing their personal and professional lives than do surgeons whose partners work in a non-physician field or stay at home, according to new research findings focused on surgeon marriages published in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons .

Kimberly-Clark Sponsors HAI WATCHDOG Award

November 30, 2010 5:04 am | Comments

Healthcare-associated infections are a growing global challenge with more than 1.7 million cases at any given time across the world.  In the U.S. alone, HAIs cause at least 99,000 deaths per year and cost the healthcare system more than $4 billion. Kimberly-Clark Health Care created the HAI WATCHDOG Awards program to recognize the efforts of dedicated healthcare professionals helping to prevent HAIs in their healthcare facilities, and to allow healthcare providers to share best practices for infection prevention.

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Photo Of The Day: A Third Eye

November 30, 2010 4:41 am | Comments

                                  This photo provided by New York University arts professor Wafaa Bilal, shows Bilal holding the prototype of a digital camera that he had implanted in the back of his head, in New York.

Researchers Use Patient's Own Blood To Treat Hamstring Injury

November 30, 2010 4:40 am | Comments

Researchers in London say they have found an effective two-part treatment for microtears in the hamstring: injections of the patient's own blood and a steroid along with "dry-needling," in which repeated needle punctures cause controlled internal bleeding in the injured area. Results of the study were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

GE Surgery Launches Radiation Program For Mobile C-Arm Users

November 29, 2010 5:56 am | Comments

At the RSNA 2010 conference in Chicago, GE Healthcare Surgery is introducing Brilliant, an educational program designed to help mobile C-arm users manage radiation doses. The educational program, which complements the company’s existing customer training offerings and dose reduction product features, includes radiation safety classes, an iPad application and reference tools.

Singer Dies During Bone Grinding Surgery

November 29, 2010 5:43 am | Comments

AFP) Chinese authorities have launched a probe into the death of an aspiring pop singer during plastic surgery, an incident that has sparked concerns about the dangers of going under the knife. Wang Bei, 24, a former contestant on Super Girl - China's smash-hit answer to American Idol - died on November 15 during "facial bone-grinding surgery" in Wuhan, capital of the central province of Hubei.

More CT Exams In The ER

November 29, 2010 5:38 am | Comments

A new study reports that the use of computed tomography (CT) in the nation's emergency departments is growing exponentially. If the growth trend continues, by 2011, nearly 20 percent of all emergency department visits may involve a CT exam. The results of this study were presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and published online and in the journal Radiology .

There Is Such A Thing As Too Clean

November 29, 2010 5:26 am | Comments

Young people who are overexposed to antibacterial soaps containing triclosan may suffer more allergies, and exposure to higher levels of Bisphenol A among adults may negatively influence the immune system, a new University of Michigan School of Public Health study suggests. Triclosan is a chemical compound widely used in products such as antibacterial soaps, toothpaste, pens, diaper bags and medical devices.

Inadequate Surgical Coverage In The ER

November 24, 2010 3:45 am | Comments

The majority of emergency department directors responding to a survey report inadequate on-call trauma coverage, and nearly one-quarter report a loss or downgrade of their hospitals' trauma center designations. The survey results are reported in a new study appearing online and in the December print edition of Academic Emergency Medicine.

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