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Despite Debate, MS Patients Find Surgical Liberation In Mexico

September 22, 2010 4:51 am | Comments

Jim Bailey, Trail Daily Times TRAIL, B.C. — A pair of British Columbia brothers who travelled to Mexico for a controversial surgical procedure to avoid becoming wheelchair-bound say they're now recovering with a new sense of liberation. Matt Berukoff and his brother Dan, from Fruitvale, both suffer from multiple sclerosis.

Obesity Hurting Wallet And Health

September 22, 2010 4:40 am | Comments

Lauran Neergaard, AP Obesity puts a drag on the wallet as well as health, especially for women. Doctors have long known that medical bills are higher for the obese, but that's only a portion of the real-life costs. George Washington University researchers added in things like employee sick days, lost productivity, even the need for extra gasoline — and found the annual cost of being obese is $4,879 for a woman and $2,646 for a man.

More Hospital Patients Unable To Pay

September 22, 2010 4:32 am | Comments

Hannah Wolfson, AP More patients at UAB Hospital haven't been able to pay their bills over the last two years because of the tough economy, and hospital administrators are predicting the trend will continue in 2011. "High unemployment and fewer insured patients are affecting both the hospital and the faculty," John Faulstich, the UAB Health System's chief financial officer, told the University of Alabama System board of trustees.

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New Blood Clot Prevention Strategies

September 22, 2010 4:23 am | Comments

Treating hospital patients with thigh-length surgical stockings, rather than knee-high socks, can reduce life threatening blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers found that knee-high stockings, which are similar to flight socks, do little in stroke patients to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a life threatening form of blood clot that can travel up into the heart and lungs.

Less Invasive Surgery Approved For Breast Cancer Treatment

September 21, 2010 6:41 am | Comments

September 21, 2010 Maria Cheng, AP (AP) Some breast cancer patients may do just as well with a less invasive surgery to remove selected lymph nodes rather than the aggressive operation normally used to remove them all, a new study says. In the biggest trial yet to compare the two procedures, North American researchers found early breast cancer patients don't need the more interventionist surgery to live longer.

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Post-Op High Blood Sugar Associated With Surgical Infections

September 21, 2010 6:33 am | Comments

High blood glucose levels after surgery may be an important risk factor for infection at the surgical site in patients having general surgery, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Surgery . Surgical site infection accounts for 14 to 17 percent of hospital-acquired infections, making it the third most common type of infection acquired at health-care facilities and the most common among patients having surgery, according to background information in the article.

Worm Shot Out Of Man's Eye With Lasers

September 21, 2010 6:22 am | Comments

Doctors rushed a Cedar Rapids, Iowa man into a treatment room after they found a worm had taken up residence in his eye. John Matthews said he sought medical help after he noticed two spots obscuring his vision in his left eye. Several specialists tested him and he was sent to the ophthalmology department at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

Appendectomy Delays Not Associated With Adverse Outcomes

September 21, 2010 6:18 am | Comments

Delays of 12 hours or more before surgery do not appear to adversely affect 30-day outcomes among patients undergoing appendectomies for acute appendicitis, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Surgery . "Appendectomy is the most common emergent surgical procedure performed worldwide, with appendicitis accounting for approximately 1 million hospital days annually," the authors write.

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Robotically Assisted PCI System Safe, Feasible

September 21, 2010 5:56 am | Comments

The first in-human study of a robotically assisted percutaneous coronary intervention system demonstrated that the technique was safe and feasible. The results of the study were presented at the 22nd annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation.

Kids In Pakistan Without Food, Facing Death

September 20, 2010 7:12 am | Comments

More than 100,000 children left homeless by Pakistan's floods are in danger of dying because they simply do not have enough to eat. The aid group Doctors Without Borders has already converted one ward into an inpatient feeding center. By Margie Mason, AP Medical Writer September 20, 2010 SUKKUR, Pakistan (AP) — Suhani Bunglani fans flies away from her two baby girls as one sleeps motionless while the other stares without blinking at the roof of their tent, her empty belly bulging beneath a green flowered shirt.

Video Games Lead to Faster Decisions That Are No Less Accurate

September 20, 2010 7:12 am | Comments

Cognitive scientists from the University of Rochester have discovered that playing action video games trains people to make the right decisions faster. The researchers found that video game players develop a heightened sensitivity to what is going on around them, and this benefit doesn't just make them better at playing video games, but improves a wide variety of general skills that can help with everyday activities like multitasking, driving, reading small print, keeping track of friends in a crowd, and navigating around town.

Follow Up: 911 Calls Detail Johns Hopkins Shooting Afermath

September 20, 2010 7:11 am | Comments

BALTIMORE (AP) — A frightened patient at Johns Hopkins Hospital told 911 operators that her parents were trying to keep the door to her room shut after they heard gunfire. Recordings of 911 released Friday to The Associated Press detail the tense moments after a man opened fire on a surgeon who was updating him on his mother's condition.

Exploring The Power Of Virtual Surgical Planning

September 20, 2010 7:11 am | Comments

Materialise announced that it would lend its expertise in virtual surgical planning to researcher Dr. J. B. Jupiter, Chief Hand and Upper Extremity Service at Massachusetts General Hospital. Through an AO funded, IRB approved study, Dr. Jupiter will use SurgiCase® Orthopaedics to explore the advantages of computer-assisted surgery, virtual 3D planning and intra-operative use of patient-specific surgical guides in osteotomies to correct compound wrist fractures-the first research project of its kind.

The "Surgeon's Dread"

September 20, 2010 7:10 am | by Susan Spencer-Wendel | Comments

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — It has been called the "surgeon's dread." The most common mistake made in surgery, according to medical journals, is leaving a sponge or instrument inside a patient. County Judge Nelson Bailey knows precisely what happens when something is left behind.

Diaries Can Help ICU Patients From Developing PTSD

September 17, 2010 5:44 am | Comments

Some intensive care patients develop post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) after the trauma of a difficult hospital stay, and this is thought to be exacerbated by delusional or fragmentary memories of their time in the intensive care unit. Now researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Critical Care have found that if staff and close relatives make a diary for patients, featuring information about their stay and accompanied by photographs, PTSD rates can be significantly reduced.

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