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Surgical Products Daily

Doctors Helping Children Die

March 2, 2010 4:02 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP It's a situation too agonizing to contemplate — a child dying and in pain. Now a small but provocative study suggests that doctors may be giving fatal morphine doses to a few children dying of cancer, to end their suffering at their parents' request. A handful of parents told researchers that they had asked doctors to hasten their children's deaths — and that doctors complied, using high doses of the powerful painkiller.

Robotics Could Raise The Bar For PCI

March 1, 2010 5:26 am | Comments

Last week’s Cardiovascular Research Technology conference heard George W. Vetrovec, M.D., of Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center suggest that the robotic CorPath system from Corindus could potentially raise the standard of care for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Corindus Vascular Robotics focuses on providing precision vascular robotic systems.

Buffett: U.S. Health Care Like An Economic Tape Worm

March 1, 2010 5:03 am | Comments

Josh Funk, AP Billionaire Warren Buffett says health care costs are a major drain on U.S. businesses and act like an “economic tape worm.” The head of the holding company Berkshire Hathaway, Inc. said Monday on CNBC that America's health care system needs fundamental reform to attack costs because it's not practical to continue devoting roughly 17 percent of the nation's gross domestic product to health care.

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Buffett: U.S. Health Care Like An Economic Tape Worm

March 1, 2010 5:01 am | Comments

Josh Funk, AP Billionaire Warren Buffett says health care costs are a major drain on U.S. businesses and act like an “economic tape worm.” The head of the holding company Berkshire Hathaway, Inc. said Monday on CNBC that America's health care system needs fundamental reform to attack costs because it's not practical to continue devoting roughly 17 percent of the nation's gross domestic product to health care.

NOTES Technique Produces Scarless Myotom

March 1, 2010 4:55 am | Comments

University of California-San Diego Medical Center surgeons have performed America's first incision-free myotomy through the mouth. The laparoscopic technique to treat Achalasia is called the Heller Myotomy, a two-hour procedure requiring up to six small incisions in the abdomen to divide the esophageal muscle.

Study Shows New Surgical Option In Treating Strokes

March 1, 2010 4:43 am | Comments

Marilynn Marchione, AP People at risk of a stroke because of narrowed neck arteries can be safely treated with a less drastic option than the surgery done now, the largest study ever done on these treatments concludes. If Medicare agrees to cover it, hundreds of thousands of Americans a year might be able to have an artery-opening procedure and a stent instead of surgery to remove built-up plaque, doctors say.

SSI Surgical Sold

March 1, 2010 4:17 am | Comments

Teleflex, Inc. recently announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its SSI Surgical Services, Inc. business to an unnamed, privately-owned multi-service line healthcare company for approximately $25 million. The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close before the end of the first quarter of 2010.

Poll: Less Fear For Healthcare Overhaul

February 26, 2010 5:00 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, AP With President Barack Obama's health care overhaul in limbo, Americans' fears about its effect on them eased in January, according to a poll released as the president tries to revive sweeping Democratic legislation. The monthly poll from the non-partisan Robert Wood Johnson Foundation also found that three-fourths of Americans still think it's important that the President include health care reform in addressing the nation's economic crisis — even if many have misgivings.

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Radiation Safeguards Added To CT Scanners

February 26, 2010 4:45 am | Comments

(Reuters) An industry group representing the top five manufacturers of CT equipment have committed to adding new safeguards in helping prevent excess exposure to radiation. The Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance said manufacturers will add a color-coded warning system to give health care providers clear indications of when they are doing scans that give patients potentially dangerous doses of radiation.

Flight Simulator For Robotic Surgery

February 26, 2010 4:23 am | Comments

A collaboration between the Center for Robotic Surgery at Roswell Park Cancer Institute and the University at Buffalo's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has produced a simulator that closely approximates the touch and feel of Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci™ robotic surgical system.

Surgeon Advocates Gastric Bypass In Non-Obese Patients

February 26, 2010 4:05 am | Comments

Samuel Goldsmith, New York Daily News A Manhattan doctor thinks he may have found a surgical cure for Type 2 diabetes. Dr. Francesco Rubino will soon begin a surgical trial with overweight, but not obese, diabetes patients in which he'll perform gastric bypass surgery to reverse the disease. Rubino, the chief of gastrointestinal surgery at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, feels that because a significant number of people with lower body mass indexes can develop diabetes, that the medical community needs to start asking whether BMI should be the only clinically appropriate way to decide who gets diabetes-targeted surgery.

Surgery Tech Sentenced To 30 Years In Prison

February 26, 2010 3:52 am | Comments

A surgery technician who infected about three dozen people with hepatitis C after she injected herself with painkiller-filled syringes and replaced them with ones filled with saline, has been sentenced to 30 years in prison. Kristen Diane Parker received the sentence in federal court after pleading guilty to some of the charges in the case.

Unnecessary Mastectomy Leads To Protocol Changes

February 24, 2010 6:00 am | Comments

The results of a misread pathology report and results unnecessary mastectomy at the Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital in Windsor, Ontario has led hospitals throughout the region to reconsider their surgical protocols. Officials at Windsor hospitals said that surgeons are generally the only ones looking over the final pathology and clinical diagnosis report before surgery, even though many pairs of eyes may see a patient's chart and test results throughout the cancer diagnosis and treatment process, as is the case in most hospitals across Ontario.

Pediatricians Pushing For More Choking Warning Labels

February 24, 2010 5:43 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP When 4-year-old Eric Stavros Adler choked to death on a piece of hot dog, his anguished mother never dreamed that the popular kids' food could be so dangerous. Some food makers, including Oscar Mayer, have warning labels about choking, but not nearly enough, says Joan Stavros Adler, Eric's mom.

Work Hours On The Decline For Doctors

February 24, 2010 5:31 am | Comments

Carla K. Johnson, AP Doctors have steadily cut their work hours over the past decade, a new study finds, something that experts say may only worsen the health care situation. It's not that doctors are terrible slackers. Average hours dropped from about 55 to 51 hours per week from 1996 to 2008, according to the analysis, which will appear in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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