Advertisement
News
Subscribe to Surgical Products Magazine News
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Surgical Products Daily

Worst Doctor In Norway Still Operating

May 24, 2010 7:19 am | Comments

A surgeon who lost the right to operate in Norway after 29 cases of malpractice is working unhindered at a hospital in northern Sweden, where managers were previously unaware of her error-strewn past. Danish doctor Johanne Krogh, 62, has become synonymous in Norway with medical malpractice after a series of high profile incidents that changed patients’ lives for the worse.

Frequency Of Minimally Invasive Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Grows

May 24, 2010 7:12 am | Comments

With the recent launch of the Neurosurgical Spine Program at Saint Louis University Hospital’s Center for Cerebrovascular and Skull Base Surgery, the hospital has seen a dramatic increase in the number of minimally-invasive spinal procedures, including lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Designed to stop the motion at a painful vertebral segment, this procedure is traditionally performed via a large incision on the back, stripping muscles away from the spine.

Major Advances In Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery

May 24, 2010 7:00 am | Comments

By the age of five Rachel had been struggling with seizures brought on by intractable epilepsy for nearly three years.  During these episodes, her body would jerk and shake and then go limp. Her lips would turn blue, her breathing would become shallow and her eyes would move rapidly back and forth.

Advertisement

Anesthesia Producing Misconceptions, Anxiety

May 24, 2010 6:34 am | Comments

A recent survey shows that 85 percent of participating patients said they were anxious about receiving a general anesthetic. The report is published in the May issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing . Key concerns included dying while asleep, not waking up after surgery, waking up during surgery and anxiety while waiting to go into surgery or arriving at the OR door.

Surprising Hub For Plastic Surgery

May 24, 2010 6:22 am | Comments

Despite being more affiliated with the conservative nature of Mormon religion than the blatant silicon endowments of communities like L.A. or Miami, Salt Lake City continues to be a hub for plastic surgery. The number of cosmetic surgeons in the city even led Forbes to dub it the vainest city in the U.

Estrogen-Lowering Drugs Minimizes Breast Cancer Surgery

May 21, 2010 8:04 am | Comments

A nationwide study has confirmed the benefit of giving estrogen-lowering drugs before surgery to breast cancer patients. The treatment increased the likelihood that women could undergo breast-conservation surgery, also called lumpectomy, instead of mastectomy. Sponsored by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group, the study took place at 118 hospitals across the country and involved 352 postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast tumors.

Pool Therapy Becoming More Significant In Post-Op Recovery

May 21, 2010 7:43 am | Comments

State-of-the-art aquatic therapy will soon be a featured rehabilitation option for patients at UniHealth Post-Acute Care of Durhamin Durham, North Carolina. UPAC of Durha will offer patients a program that uses therapeutic warm water rehabilitation to reduce pain and improve mobility. UPAC selected HydroWorx for its therapy pool because of the unit's spaciousness and patient-focused features that include resistance jets for massage, exercise, and therapy; an adjustable depth that allows each patient to enter at floor level and be lowered gently into the water; a cushioned, low-impact treadmill on the pool floor; and underwater cameras with corresponding monitors for therapy evaluation and diagnosis.

Creation Of Synthetic Cell Opens Numerous Doors

May 21, 2010 7:36 am | Comments

Lauran Neergaard, AP Scientists announced a bold step in the enduring quest to create artificial life. They've produced a living cell powered by manmade DNA. While such work can evoke images of Frankenstein-like scientific tinkering, it also is exciting hopes that it could eventually lead to new fuels, better ways to clean polluted water, faster vaccine production and more.

Advertisement

Reused Pacemakers Save Costs, Lives In Third World Countries

May 21, 2010 7:19 am | Comments

Pacemaker reuse may be a safe, effective and ethical alternative to address the medical needs for people in Third World countries who couldn't otherwise afford therapy, according to a new study unveiled by the American Heart Association. Researchers examined pacemaker reuse compared with a control population of new device implantation in studies from 1975 to 2009.

Single Port Surgery Requires Unique Skills

May 19, 2010 8:08 am | Comments

A poster presented at the 12th World Congress Of Endoscopic Surgery in April of this year concluded that single port surgery laparoscopic surgery requires unique skills that can—and need to—be learned by surgeons in order to perform the technique effectively. In the research, titled “Performance Ramifications of Single Port Laparoscopic Surgery: Measuring Differences in Task Performance Using Simulation,” Nathan E Conway, MD and colleagues suggest that single port laparoscopic surgery is a promising technique, but one that may be associated with specific psychomotor challenges such as use of articulated and/or deliberately crossed instruments.

Hospitals Repay Over $3 Million To Settle Surgical Claims

May 19, 2010 7:53 am | Comments

Two Indiana hospitals have repaid millions of dollars to the federal government to settle claims that they overcharged for a type of spinal surgery. Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie paid just under $2 million. President and chief executive Mike Haley said the hospital had fully cooperated with the investigation and voluntarily agreed to repay the money.

FDA Warns St. Jude Over Device Marketing Approach

May 19, 2010 7:40 am | Comments

Matthew Perrone, AP The Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter to medical device maker St. Jude Medical, Inc. due to the company promoting its device for an unapproved use. In a letter dated April 23, the FDA takes issue with claims on a St. Jude website promoting its Epicor ablation system.

Canadian Doc Accused Of Illegally Treating Top Athletes

May 19, 2010 7:27 am | Comments

Carolyn Thompson, AP A Canadian sports medicine doctor whose superstar clients include Tiger Woods and Alex Rodriguez, faces federal criminal charges in the United States for allegedly bringing unapproved drugs into the country and unlawfully treating professional athletes. Dr. Anthony Galea was charged in a criminal complaint in U.

MIS Sinus Surgery Becoming More Popular

May 19, 2010 7:12 am | Comments

Sinus surgery performed using an endoscope appears to be increasingly common for the management of chronic sinus disease among Medicare beneficiaries, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery . Chronic rhinosinusitis is characterized by infection and inflammation of the sinus cavities and nose that lasts longer than three months, according to background information in the article.

Status, Gender Impacts Surgical Resident Career Plans

May 19, 2010 7:01 am | Comments

Surgical residents who are single or do not have children are more likely to plan for specialty fellowships, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Surgery . Graduate surgical education has changed significantly in recent decades, according to background information in the article.

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading