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Surgical Products Daily

Concussions On The Rise Among Kids Playing Sports

August 30, 2010 7:06 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP Emergency room visits for school-age athletes with concussions has skyrocketed in recent years, suggesting the intensity of kids' sports has increased along with awareness of head injuries. The findings, in a study of national data, doesn’t necessarily mean that concussions are on the rise.

OR Fist Fight Leads To Birth Complications

August 30, 2010 6:44 am | Comments

(AP) Italy's health minister traveled to Sicily to apologize to a new mother for an operating room fist fight between two doctors that led to her botched delivery. Laura Salpietro, 30, had to have her uterus removed and her son Antonio suffered heart problems and possible brain damage following his birth in Messina's public hospital, Italian news reports said.

J&J Recalls Hip Replacement Systems

August 27, 2010 7:47 am | Comments

Linda A. Johnson, AP Johnson & Johnson's artificial joint business is recalling two hip replacement products, just two days after getting hit with a government warning that it is illegally marketing two other products. It is the 11th J&J recall since September. DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.

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Surgeons Remove 56-Pound Tumor

August 27, 2010 7:37 am | Comments

Vicente L. Panetta, AP Doctors were shocked when they looked into a woman's uterus searching for an orange-size tumor but found something that resembled a giant rock instead. Surgeons ended up removing a 56-pound tumor from the 54-year-old woman. It was 19” across. “At first sight, one could see it was going to be a big tumor, but not that big,” said Dr.

Clinical Trials Challenge Balloon Pumping

August 27, 2010 7:30 am | Comments

Patients with coronary artery disease undergoing angioplasty do not benefit from having their circulation artificially supported with a balloon pump as a preventative measure during angioplasty, according to the first randomized trial studying the practice and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) .

Obesity Surgery In England Increases 10-Fold Since 2000

August 27, 2010 7:18 am | Comments

The use of bariatric or weight loss surgery has increased ten-fold in NHS hospitals in England since 2000, finds a study. One reason for this rapid rise is increased demand from obese patients as they become more aware of surgery as a viable treatment option, suggest the researchers. Bariatric surgery is performed on people who are dangerously obese, for the purpose of losing weight.

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U.S. Hospitals Slow In Adopting EHR Platform

August 27, 2010 7:08 am | Comments

Transforming the U.S. health care system from paper-based to electronic-based may improve health care quality and reduce costs, but a new study by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health suggests that goal is far off. The adoption of basic or comprehensive electronic health records by U.

Patients Not Finding Post-Op Relief

August 25, 2010 6:12 am | Comments

One in seven patients experience more pain, physical and emotional problems a year after surgery than before their operation, and one-quarter have less vitality. Those are the key findings of a research study of more than 400 patients published online by the British Journal of Surgery Researchers from The Netherlands spoke to 216 women and 185 men with an average age of 54, who had undergone planned procedures, ranging from plastic surgery to orthopaedic surgery.

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Next Generation Surgical Robots Could Steer Themselves

August 25, 2010 5:58 am | by Richard Merritt | Comments

As physician-guided robots routinely operate on patients at most major hospitals, the next generation robot could eliminate a surprising element from that scenario – the doctor. Feasibility studies conducted by Duke University bioengineers have demonstrated that a robot can locate a man-made, or phantom, lesion in simulated human organs, guide a device to the lesion and take multiple samples during a single session.

More Seniors May Have To Switch Drug Plans

August 25, 2010 5:45 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, AP A plan by Medicare to try to make it simpler for consumers to pick drug coverage could force three million seniors to switch plans next year whether they like it or not, says an independent analysis. That risks undercutting President Barack Obama's promise that people can keep their health plans if they like them.

Radiologists Seeking A Strategy For Imaging Overuse

August 25, 2010 5:22 am | Comments

Over-utilization of medical imaging services exposes patients to unnecessary radiation and adds to healthcare costs, according to a report appearing online and in the October issue of the journal Radiology that calls on radiologists to spearhead a collaborative effort to curb imaging usage. “In most cases, an imaging procedure enhances the accuracy of a diagnosis or guides a medical treatment and is fully justified, because it benefits the patient,” said the article's lead author, William R.

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Narcolepsy Fears Collide With H1N1 Vaccine Use

August 24, 2010 6:56 am | Comments

Finland's National Institute for Health and Wefare has recommended halting the use of the Pandemrix swine flu vaccine until a probe into a possible link to narcolepsy among children is concluded.  The National Institute for Health and Wefare (THL) has received six reports of children known to have received the vaccine who have developed the chronic sleep disorder since the beginning of the year, it said, stressing, however, that this is in line with the normal annual rate of narcolepsy cases.

Engineering Shorter ER Times

August 24, 2010 6:45 am | Comments

Emergency room waiting times could be cut by over one-third and patients' length of stay by almost two-thirds, thanks to a new approach to the triage process of sorting patients for further assessment and treatment, according to research published in the International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage .

Practice Opens For Football Team Plagued By Mystery Ailment

August 24, 2010 5:57 am | Comments

Anne M. Peterson, AP Doctors were trying to determine why 24 McMinnville High School players developed a condition that caused intense pain and dangerous swelling in their arms, hospitalizing two boys just as a football training camp was getting under way. The athletes were taking part in the immersion camp organized last week by new coach Jeff Kearin to get ready for the season.

Stem Cell Regulations Temporarily Blocked

August 24, 2010 5:18 am | Comments

Pete Yost, AP The Obama administration's expansion of stem cell research has suffered a significant setback with a judge's ruling that blocks work on treating life-threatening conditions, say private groups pushing for scientific breakthroughs in medicine. Monday's decision by U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth will “drive the best scientific minds into work less likely to yield treatments,” says Sean Tipton of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

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