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Surgical Products Daily

Incidents Raise Questions About Robotic Surgery

May 7, 2010 5:21 am | Comments

Complications with some recent operations performed at Wentworth-Douglass Hospital in Vermont have raised concerns about the amount of training surgeons should undergo before using a da Vinci system on live patients. These incidents, which have included lacerated bladders and severed ureters, have many wondering if the marketing advantages for a hospital are being given greater priority over patient safety.

Mayo Clinic Details Future Use Of Scopes For Cancer Detection

May 5, 2010 8:12 am | Comments

Just as cameras and televisions have been reinvented in the last decade with improved optics, sharpness and brightness, so have the tiny imaging scopes that physicians use to peer into the body's nooks and crannies --its organs and digestive system. And few places in the United States are testing the power of these new endoscopic optics as thoroughly as are researchers at Mayo Clinic.

Tired Doctors Botch Operations

May 5, 2010 8:12 am | Comments

(Reuters) - Overworked South African doctors are prone to botched surgical operations and in some instances have left gloves and scissors in patients' bodies after operations, the Sunday Independent newspaper reported. The paper's investigations showed such acts of negligence have cost the state over 1 billion rand ($136.

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Those With Severe Asthma Offered Radical Treatment

May 5, 2010 8:11 am | Comments

Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — People with severe asthma are getting a radically different treatment option: A way to snake a wire inside their lungs and melt off some of the tissue that squeezes their airways shut. Bronchial thermoplasty isn't for everyone, just a subset who wheeze despite today's best medications.

Spanish Face Transplant Patient Goes Public

May 5, 2010 8:11 am | Comments

Daniel Woolls, Associated Press Writer MADRID (AP) — A Spanish man who underwent a partial face transplant hugged his surgeon Tuesday and expressed gratitude to the donor's family as he appeared in public for the first time since the January operation. The patient, identified only as Rafael, spoke with difficulty at a news conference at Seville's Virgen del Rocio Hospital, where he had undergone the 30-hour surgery.

Robotic Catheter System Efficient, Safe For Vascular Procedures

May 5, 2010 8:10 am | Comments

Hansen Medical, Inc. announces results from a pre-clinical study showing that use of its Sensei@ Robotic Catheter System in procedures for treatment of vascular disease has the potential to reduce procedure time by 80 percent, which may result in a significant reduction in both radiation exposure and catheter manipulations.

Ansell Launches Antimicrobial Surgical Glove

May 4, 2010 8:02 am | Comments

It is the first surgical glove which incorporates a proprietary antimicrobial coating to provide an additional level of protection to surgical staff against viruses and bacteria, in the event of a breach during surgery. May 4, 2010   Ansell announces the launch of their new GAMMEX® Powder-Free glove with AMT Antimicrobial Technology, at the Annual Congress of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in Perth, Australia.

Same Brain Tumor Tissue That Takes Lives Can Be Used To Save Them

May 4, 2010 8:02 am | Comments

Each day in the United States, 482 people are diagnosed with a brain tumor. For these 482 people, not many treatments exist. With the current treatments available, only 5% of those diagnosed with a Glioblastoma Multiform will survive more than 5 years. Only two new treatments have been approved by the FDA in the past two decades.

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Access To Primary Care May Reduce Surgeries Among Children

May 4, 2010 8:01 am | Comments

The availability of surgeons may increase the likelihood that children will receive optional ear and throat surgeries, while the availability of primary care providers, such as pediatricians and family physicians, may decrease the likelihood of children undergoing these procedures, according to research to be presented Saturday, May 1 at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Treating Battlefield Injuries With Light-Activated Technology

May 4, 2010 8:01 am | Comments

Traumatic battlefield injuries may be more effectively treated by using a new light-activated technology developed as a result of research managed by Air Force Office of Scientific Research and supported by funds from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. This new treatment for war injuries includes using a process or technology called Photochemical Tissue Bonding, which can replace conventional sutures, staples and glues in repairing skin wounds, reconnecting severed peripheral nerves, blood vessels, tendons and incisions in the cornea.

Surgeons' Pilot Prevention Program Reduces Postoperative Pneumonia

May 4, 2010 8:00 am | Comments

A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows the new low-cost program is successful in decreasing pneumonia in the hospital surgical ward. May 4, 2010 The results of new research results published in the April issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons show that a pilot pneumonia-prevention program significantly reduced postoperative pneumonia in a hospital surgical ward.

Comparing Resistive-Polymer Versus Forced-Air Warming

May 4, 2010 7:50 am | Comments

In a recent study, researchers compare the efficacy of resistant-polymer and forced-air warming devices in maintaining normothermia in orthopedic patients. May 4, 2010 According to a study published in the March 2010 issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, several adverse consequences can be caused by mild perioperative hypothermia.

Pay-For-Performance Could Hinder Obese Patient Surgeries

May 3, 2010 7:09 am | Comments

Pay-for-performance reimbursement of surgeons, intended to reward doctors and hospitals for good patient outcomes, may instead be creating financial incentives for discriminating against obese patients, who are much more likely to suffer expensive complications after even the most routine surgeries, according to new Johns Hopkins research.

Obese Women Diagnosed With Larger, Later-Stage Breast Cancers

May 3, 2010 7:00 am | Comments

A new study finds obese women are more likely to have breast cancer detected at a later stage and to have lymph node metastases at the time of diagnosis than women who are not obese. May 3, 2010 Obese women are more likely to have breast cancer detected at a later stage and to have lymph node metastases at the time of diagnosis than women who are not obese, according to a study presented this week at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons.

Ansell's New Green Packaging

May 3, 2010 6:40 am | Comments

Ansell Healthcare Products has improved its glove packaging with a newer, greener design that reduces packaging waste. Ansell’s increased-count exam pack contains more exam gloves per box – and per case. The new dispensing box still fits into customers’ existing wall brackets, yet provides 50 to 100 percent more gloves, depending on the specific glove selected.

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