Advertisement

Recently, I saw a young friend who is training to be a surgeon. Extremely bright and the recipient of numerous medical school awards for her work with patients, she had been anxious as a student about the grueling hours she would face once she began working as a junior surgeon on the wards.

Now she was laughing over those old fears. “Training has changed a lot,” she said. “My life is different than yours was — I have a lot of time outside the hospital.” She described how she loved her work but was able to sleep at home most nights, go out regularly with friends, stay involved with her church and take an improv class.

Click here to continue reading this post

Advertisement
Advertisement