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Preparing Your OR For the Future

Thu, 05/27/2010 - 12:37pm
Response by Scott Hodsden, Director of Sales and Marketing, Walters Healthcare Resources

What should surgical professionals consider when purchasing equipment booms to ensure their OR is adaptable for future upgrades and updates?

May 28, 2010

When purchasing a boom, one of the main considerations should be the layout of the operating room and the best placement of the boom, in order to handle all the cases that will be done in that room for the perceivable future.

When purchasing a boom, one of the main considerations should be the layout of the operating room and the best placement of the boom, in order to handle all the cases that will be done in that room for the perceivable future. Aside from having a boom that has all the necessary functions, having someone who is an expert to lay the room out properly is critical. Careful consideration to the location of the boom is paramount to the successful function of the equipment in the room. The vendor’s representative will facilitate the discussion of boom placement. They know the capabilities of their equipment, and after discussing the needs of the staff; they will suggest the most efficient layout to utilize their equipment.

The first question that clinicians should ask themselves is, “where is the best location for this boom?” You should consider all possible locations to determine which placement would provide the best coverage.  As you look at the plans for a new OR or if your renovating an existing OR, keep in mind that anytime you can add more coverage around the patient you will add flexibility to handle a variety of different cases in the future.  For example, if you position the boom at the foot of the patient, it could be possible to place the equipment on either side of the patient from the shoulder to the foot.  You may be designing the room for a specialty that keeps the video equipment at the patient’s shoulder 100% of the time, but by choosing a location that maximizes the coverage around the patient, you can be better prepared for an unpredictable future. There are several factors that come into play, but the manufacturer’s expert should be able to facilitate this discussion.  Our company has been called in to relocate booms, when the staff determined that the placement was not appropriate for their needs. There is a lot of work and cost associated with changing the layout of the operating room if it’s not done right in the first place. Always look to the future and come up with a plan that allows the boom to be utilized in a variety of situations.
 
You should also consider cabling. DVI is big now, but there could be a new cable that will come out that needs to be pulled through an existing boom. Is there enough space in the boom to handle new cabling? How easy or difficult is it to get a new and upgraded cable through the arms? Recently, there’s been a big push for larger video monitors, in which case, existing flat panel arms in the OR must be upgraded to accept a larger monitor. Wireless monitors are beginning to emerge, which will make it somewhat easier to relocate equipment booms and flat panel arms in the future. But for now, all factors must be considered.

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