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How Saratoga Hospital Developed Operating Rooms For The Future

Tue, 05/14/2013 - 9:31am

Saratoga Hospital, located in Saratoga Springs, New York, set its sights on becoming a leading destination for minimally-invasive surgery and cutting-edge technology. To achieve that goal, the hospital launched an ambitious plan to build 10 new operating rooms. As the project’s planning began, a need arose for the hospital to upgrade one of its existing operating rooms- known as OR2. This general surgery room, while well-suited for many types of minimally-invasive surgeries, lacked a permanently installed, ergonomically comfortable visualization and equipment management system that supported the MIS caseload of that room. The building’s existing steel structure prohibited the traditional upgrade in which monitors and equipment booms would be suspended from the ceiling. The room also lacked space for an audio visual equipment closet where the hardware of a visualization system would normally be located.

Selecting NuBOOM

The hospital, which operates the only acute care facility in Saratoga County, needed a different solution. A multi-disciplinary team, led by Kevin Ronanye, Vice President Operations/Facilities, was already in place to manage the OR reconstruction. OR Director Sharman Lisieski and surgeon, Dr. Howard Yeaton, were two members of the team.

The team started evaluating potential options. The type of construction the upgrade required was a major factor in making a product selection. Cost, timing, and minimizing disruptions for the hospital’s surgery team were also taken into account. Maintenance and adjustment of a ceiling installation was a consideration since maintenance would require access to the ceiling itself, rendering the OR unusable.

Several members of the team traveled to Florida to visit a facility that had installed a U-Series NuBOOM, CompView Medical’s newest all-in-one equipment management, visualization, and ergonomic boom appliance. A decision to purchase the U-Series NuBOOM, based on the current infrastructure, would allow the OR to be cost-effectively updated with minimal disruption. The system would also provide Saratoga Hospital with the ability to improve efficiencies, by pre-positioning MIS equipment on the NuBOOM’s shelves, relieving the staff of shuttling separate equipment carts into OR2 for each surgery.

The team took the opportunity to assess the NuBOOM as a potential system for installation in all of the new ORs during the reconstruction. After NuBOOM was selected by the core team, they took the proposal to the hospital’s board of directors for approval.

Adoption and Use

Operating room construction projects typically take weeks or months, but the NuBOOM system was installed over two days in February 2013. The newly equipped OR2 soon became a major draw for physicians from several specialties, especially general surgeons and urologists. G. Michael Ortiz, MD urologist, one of several surgeons using the NuBOOM system has championed the project.

The NuBOOM equipped room, with its four 26” LED medical monitors, provides state-of-the-art visualization that is superior to previous capabilities at Saratoga. The U-Series NuBOOM’s streamlined design incorporates precision bearings in boom joints that enable easy repositioning of video monitors; and movable shelves that facilitate better patient access and staff movement. The system is also already being used in after-hours “on-call” situations and during weekends, underscoring its rapid adoption and ease of use.

Saratoga’s Lisieski cites the company’s excellent customer service and open communication leading to a quick and incident-free installation. Because the CompView system is anchored to the floor instead of suspended from the ceiling, unlike traditional booms, Lisieski anticipates scheduling many types of procedures in OR2 in the future.

“In traditionally designed rooms, the table has to remain in a fixed location around which the monitors pivot,” Lisieski said. “The NuBOOM is incredibly flexible, allowing OR staff to reposition the OR table into comfortable viewing locations for the surgeon.”

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