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Surgical Products Daily

A Letter To Patients With Chronic Illness

July 21, 2010 7:13 am | by Dr. Rob | Comments

Dear Patients: You have it very hard, much harder than most people understand.  Having sat for 16 years listening to the stories, seeing the tiredness in your eyes, hearing you try to describe the indescribable, I have come to understand that I too can’t understand what your lives are like.

Question The Meds

July 20, 2010 7:19 am | by GruntDoc | Comments

In my practice I try to apply some common sense, adopting a colleagues’ phrase “common things are common”. This is particularly useful in the diagnosis of new problems that have eluded diagnosis, and I apply a lesson learned from a fellow resident (a PharmD before med school) who told me: new problems, ask about new meds.

A Wild Frontier

July 20, 2010 7:13 am | by Amanda McGowan, editor | Comments

How image and video documentation is proving more valuable — inside the OR and out. July 20, 2010 The transition to HD in the OR has resulted in a need for better archiving solutions. Photo: Sony In today’s surgical environment, the reasons to record images and video are wide and varied.

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Physician Burnout Harms Patients

July 19, 2010 7:56 am | Comments

Brainstorm: Temperature Monitoring

July 19, 2010 7:55 am | Comments

Maintaining adequate surgical patient temperature is imperative to a positive outcome. Here, Craig Fernandes, Director of Acute Care Marketing for DeRoyal discusses the importance of temperature monitoring in both pre- and post- surgical procedure areas. July 19, 2010 Temperature monitoring has become a required standard both pre- and post-procedure from a patient safety and a reimbursement perspective.

Why This Doctor Felt Compelled To Go To Haiti

July 16, 2010 7:26 am | by David Chong, MD | Comments

As the world watched the greatest athletes gather to compete in Vancouver, I was on a plane to Haiti. Just getting on the plane was quite a feat. After I received an urgent e-mail for volunteer doctors from the University of Miami’s Project Medishare field hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti during an overnight shift at New York’s Presbyterian hospital, I began to send frantic requests for coverage for the week.

Cancer In A Transplant Kidney, Is It The Doctor’s Fault?

July 14, 2010 6:50 am | by Amy Tuteur, MD | Comments

May you never be an interesting case. That’s a cautionary proverb familiar to medical professionals. While it’s bad to get sick, it’s much worse to get sick with something uncommon or unusual. The more fascinating a case is for doctors, the more difficult it is for patients.

Q&A: Surgical Tables

July 14, 2010 6:44 am | MAQUET Medical Systems USA | Comments

Rich Antoine, product manager for surgical tables at MAQUET, discusses with Surgical Products the latest developments in surgical tables, how they’ve evolved to accommodate bariatric patients, and what facilities looking to purchase new tables should know for the future.

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When The Doctor Is The Patient, Humanism And Competency Matter

July 13, 2010 7:17 am | by Wendy Sue Swanson, MD | Comments

Over the past few weeks I’ve had ample opportunity to be on the other side. Not like some parents with chronically ill children or those with children who have suffered tragic illness. No, not like that; I am fortunate that hospitals aren’t a part of my family’s everyday (except for work).

Why Technology And The Internet May Not Be Good For Patients

July 12, 2010 8:07 am | by Kent Bottles, MD | Comments

Paro the robot baby harp seal was the final straw. I had vowed to myself not to think about or write about “the internet makes you smarter, the internet makes you dumber” argument.  Even when some of my favorite authors (Steven B. Johnson, Clay Shirky, Nicholas Carr, and Jonah Lehrer) weighed in, I thought it best not to participate.

Preventing Perioperative Hypothermia

July 9, 2010 8:03 am | by Tom Parafinik, Director of Sales, Enthermics Medical Systems, Inc., www.enthermics.com | Enthermics Medical Systems | Comments

Patients have several strikes against them from the start in the surgical environment. In surgery they are naked, anesthetized, in a cold room and perhaps receiving cold IV and/or irrigation fluids. All of these factors can lead to inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. (Hypothermia defined as a core temperature below 36 degrees C or 96.

Tomorrow’s Surgeons Are Today’s Video Gamers

July 9, 2010 6:52 am | by Martin Young, MBChB, FCS(SA) | Comments

As a young medical student I remember the arrival of the first video arcade games very clearly: Asteroids, Space Invaders and Pacman. I spent whatever spare cash I had on them, never playing long enough to be any good, or rich enough to get any better. When I bought my first computer in my late-twenties, I relived my excitement with the newest computer games, spending a disproportionate amount of time long into many a night.

Warming And Cooling Critical For Temperature Management

July 7, 2010 7:30 am | by Andy Fleishacker, Director of Business and Market Development and Xia Luo, M.D., Director of Clinical for Zoll Medical Corporation | Zoll Medical Corp. | Comments

Managing patient temperature in the operating room has always been a critical part of any surgical procedure. When patients undergo large open surgical procedures, such as liver, cardiovascular, burn  or any large abdominal incision, heat loss is common due to the patient being exposed to the cold OR temperature and the cooling effect of the anesthesia and mechanical ventilation.

Obese Patients Present Challenges In The ICU

July 6, 2010 7:48 am | by Ralph Gordon, MD | Comments

Obesity is a huge healthcare problem in the United States. It has reached the proportions of an epidemic and continues to get worse. Multiple medical problems including heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, sleep apnea and cancer are closely associated with obesity. The patients with extreme obesity can reach a body weight of five, six or seven hundred pounds and even higher.

Managing OR Temperature

July 2, 2010 7:19 am | by John LaDue, Division Sales Director, Hospital Services Division, Shafer Enterprises LLC | Shafer Enterprises, LLC | Comments

The Joint Commission is focusing on patient normothermia issues for patient safety and new SCIP measures require that upon release to the PACU body temperature be maintained at 36 C or higher. One of the easiest ways to help unintended hypothermia in patients is to warm the temperature of the OR .

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