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OPINION -- The Affordable Care Act Perpetuates A Myth Of Health Insurance

Mon, 12/23/2013 - 9:02am
Luis Collar, M.D.

Whenever a discussion of healthcare policy is initiated, the importance of health insurance, of extending coverage, takes center stage. The need for insurance quickly becomes an undeniable truth, a universal imperative. And we never seem to question this premise enough before getting more patients fitted with shiny, new policies. This was precisely the case with the Affordable Care Act. But where is the evidence insurance plays any role in improving anyone’s health? Why is it assumed more coverage is always the answer, particularly for routine care? I would argue it is little more than a myth, one found nowhere else in our collective understanding of insurance.

Let’s consider our experience with insurance in other areas of our lives. In most states, it’s mandatory for drivers to carry automobile insurance. But it doesn’t reduce the incidence of accidents or extend the life of a vehicle, nor does it cover oil changes, car washes, flat tires, or any other form of maintenance or unfortunate mechanical reality. Similarly, homeowners insurance doesn’t cover the cost of repairs when your kids put a hole in the wall, the price of having your gutters cleaned, or the removal of mold due to leaky pipes or unsealed windows.

Why, then, do we expect health insurance to function any differently? There is no compelling evidence that insurance improves outcomes. In fact, of the few studies conducted, most have either failed to control for known determinants of health or shown, at best, a very tenuous relationship between the two. Access to health care matters, but we mistakenly assume more insurance is the best way to increase access. We believe coverage for routine medical care, for everything from checkups to preventive care procedures, improves our nation’s health. It does not; it only appears to because of numerous confounding variables.

What is known, however, is the total amount of money available for healthcare, generally some large percentage of our GDP. That number is static at any given time and cannot be magically increased. In fact, by definition, relegating any aspect of healthcare to insurance industry jurisdiction necessarily decreases the funds available at the bedside. These companies must extract a profit; that’s how capitalism works. Moreover, whenever the scope of coverage is increased, patients and physicians give up more control as to the nature, timing, and extent of the routine care provided.

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