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BD Launches Catheter/Bloodborn Pathogen Safety Campaign

Wed, 05/04/2011 - 5:47am

(PRNewswire) BD Medical hopes their new program can offer healthcare workers the ability to better identify risks for exposure to bloodborne pathogens, take precautions to better protect themselves and share information and experiences. A segment of BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), BD Medical is the world's leading provider of IV catheters.

The BD Making Safety Safer program will provide nurses and other healthcare professionals with a forum to share information on risks, precautions and interventions, learn from experts and peers, and assist hospitals and other healthcare organizations in addressing ongoing concerns relating to blood exposure due to insertion of a short peripheral IV catheter (SPIVC).

Cheryll Collins, BSN, RN, OCN was exposed to blood from a patient infected with HIV and Hepatitis C.  "As I unhooked the [needle] chamber, the patient pulled her arm away.  The blood that was left in the hub went straight across my face and into my eye," said Collins. "That incident had a profound impact on my life, as well the lives of my husband and family."

"Although the healthcare industry has come a long way in reducing the risk of needlestick injuries and their potential dangers, mucocutaneous blood exposure during a short peripheral IV catheter insertion is still a risk today," said John Ledek, Vice President, BD Medical - Medical Surgical Systems. "BD created this educational resource to enable clinicians to better protect themselves."

This program will help educate nurses to approach short peripheral IV insertion with more caution, such as using appropriate personal protective equipment and taking other appropriate precautions to better protect themselves from contaminated blood. BD also is sponsoring online forums on blood safety and inviting clinicians to learn and share their experiences.

SPIVCs are the most commonly used device to access a patient's blood vessels. Blood exposure, including exposure that may occur upon insertion of an SPIVC, presents a risk to clinicians and patients. According to multiple published studies, up to 37.8 percent of healthcare workers report having experienced at least one blood or body fluid exposure in the preceding year.  A recent report from the International Healthcare Worker Safety Center at the University of Virginia shows that nurses are at greatest risk, reporting 48.6 percent of blood or bodily fluid exposures.

For more information, visit www.bd.com/bloodcontrol.

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