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PRNewswire - In a recently conducted survey, almost all healthcare providers say that "continuous electronic monitoring of oxygenation and ventilation should be available and considered for all patients". This monitoring "would reduce the likelihood of unrecognized clinically significant opioid-induced depression of ventilation in the post-operative period."

Almost 300 people responded to the survey, of which more than 97 percent were healthcare providers. Dr. Marc Popovich (Medical Director, Surgical Intensive Care Unit at Cleveland Clinic) expresses surprise over these results. "I am quite shocked that the disagree group is that high! The question asked whether continuous monitoring should be 'available and considered' for all patients. What this survey result is saying is that 10 percent do not have monitoring available and it is not even being considered for their patients after surgery."

To improve patient safety and health outcomes, the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation (APSF) recently released recommendations calling for continuous electronic monitoring of oxygenation and ventilation. These recommendations and expert commentary can be found at http://wp.me/p1JikT-2L.

"This electronic monitoring," explains Dr. Popovich, "would entail the use of pulse oximetry which measures the amount of oxygen in the blood and capnograph which measures the concentration of carbon dioxide that a person breathes out in exhaled air." Moreover, as Dr. Moises Auron (Department of Hospital Medicine and the Center for Pediatric Hospital Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic) says, "This intervention is easy. Simply clamp on the pulse oximeter and hook up the capnograph."

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