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Surgical Products Daily

Bariatric Accreditation Linked to Improved Rates of Patient Survival and Fewer Complications

September 4, 2014 10:34 am | Comments

Patients who underwent weight loss operations in recent years, when most bariatric surgical centers were accredited, had fewer postoperative complications and were 2.3 times less likely to die in the hospital than patients who had bariatric procedures performed before a national movement toward facility accreditation was taking place, according to new study findings.

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3M Partners With Premier on Catheter Contracts

September 3, 2014 5:04 pm | Comments

3M Critical & Chronic Care Solutions announced last week that it has reached a group purchasing agreement with health care alliance company Premier, Inc. for multiple catheter securement and stability products.

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Knee Osteoarthritis Sufferers May Not Benefit From Cartilage Surgery

September 3, 2014 4:39 pm | by the American Council on Science and Health | Comments

According to the Arthritis Foundation, about 27 million people in the United States have osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected area being the knee. Many of those affected suffer from degenerative meniscal tears, which are sometimes treated with surgery. However, a new meta-analysis found that arthroscopic surgery for these tears was not associated with improvement in function of or pain in the knee.

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Hospital Mix-up: Florida Woman Has Surgery For Cancer She Never Had

September 3, 2014 11:41 am | by Rene Stutzman, Orlando Sentinel | Comments

A Winter Park, Fla., woman filed a lawsuit Tuesday asking a judge to order Florida Hospital to surrender records documenting a lab mix-up that resulted in a false cancer diagnosis and the removal of a section of her rectum, reported the Orlando Sentinel on Wednesday.

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Surgery Prices Spike With Innovation and Consolidation

September 3, 2014 11:21 am | by Bill Briggs, NBC News | Comments

The price to remove a gall bladder or replace a hip has spiked more than 20 percent during the past five years, according to an analysis of data collected for NBC News. Surgery has bloomed into a $500 billion industry in the United States, where 80 to 100 million procedures are performed annually — a per-capita rate that’s some 50 percent higher than in the European Union.

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J-Plasma® Wins Innovation of the Year From Surgeons

September 3, 2014 11:01 am | Comments

Bovie Medical, a maker of medical devices and supplies and the developer of J-Plasma®, a patented new surgical product, announced that J-Plasma® has been recognized as an Innovation of the Year by The Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons (SLS).

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Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival For Most

September 3, 2014 10:47 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

Removing both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests. The results raise concerns about riskier, potentially unnecessary operations that increasing numbers of women are choosing.

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How Well Does Bariatric Surgery Work?

September 3, 2014 10:29 am | Comments

The number of bariatric surgeries done each year in the United States has ballooned. Now, in an August 27 state-of-the-art review in The BMJ and a September 3 editorial in JAMA, David Arterburn, MD, MPH, weighs the evidence on the benefits and risks of the various types of this surgery.

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SSIs May Occur Less After Minimally Invasive Surgery

September 2, 2014 12:17 pm | Comments

Minimally invasive surgery is associated with fewer surgical-site infections than is open surgery, according to a new observational study of tens of thousands of patients, reported Rueters Health on Tuesday. "Physicians should consider the adoption of minimally invasive approaches in order to reduce the risk of surgical site infections," said lead author Dr. Giorgio Gandaglia.

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Cardiac Care: Exciting New Procedures For Babies

September 2, 2014 12:00 pm | by Priscilla Lynch, Irish Times | Comments

Heart surgery on babies who are still in the womb, 3D plastic models of actual babies’ hearts that allow surgeons to plan their surgery, and biodegradable heart stents are among the major developments on the way for pediatric cardiology patients. While they might sound like something from a science-fiction movie, all these developments will be discussed during a congenital cardiac study day Thursday in Ireland, reported the Irish Times.

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SP Interview: Cohera Medical Introduces TissuGlu Surgical Adhesive

September 2, 2014 11:34 am | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | Comments

In a recent interview with Surgical Products, Cohera Medical President and CEO Patrick Daly and Peter Rubin, MD, Chair of Plastic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh, gave their thoughts on why TissuGlu could be an exciting breakthrough for patients recovering from large-flag procedures.

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Programs Aim to Standardize Surgical Care for Children

September 2, 2014 11:05 am | Comments

For parents, the prospect of a child's surgery can be frightening, with little information on how to pick the best hospital or understand complex procedures. To help, surgeons have developed a new classification system for pediatric surgical centers according to the level of care they provide, similar to the one that classifies trauma centers, reported the Wall Street Journal on Monday.

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Non-Physical Worries Before Cancer Surgery Raise Patients’ Complication Risk

September 2, 2014 10:33 am | Comments

How well patients recover from cancer surgery may be influenced by more than their medical conditions and the operations themselves. Family conflicts and other non-medical problems may raise their risk of surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study has found.

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Cardiac Surgery: Medication Shows Mixed Results in Reducing Complications

September 2, 2014 10:05 am | Comments

Administration of colchicine, a plant-based medication commonly used to treat gout, before and after cardiac surgery showed mixed results in reducing potential complications from this type of surgery, but it did increase the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

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Medical Equipment to Keep Your Practice Up To Date

August 28, 2014 5:31 pm | Comments

With the continual onslaught of advances in modern medicine it can be overwhelming to know what medical equipment your practice truly needs or would find to be useful in treatment and diagnostics. Below are some recommendations for modern inventions as well as essential staples to keep your medical practice up-to-date. 

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