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Patients With Problems After Surgery Should Go Back to Same Hospital

December 9, 2014 11:11 am | by Reuters | Comments

When patients have complications after surgery, it’s best to go back to the hospital where the operation was done, a new study suggests. Patients who go instead to a hospital that didn’t do the original operation have a higher risk of death, the researchers found. ...     

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Boy With Massive Tumor Moved Out of ICU

December 9, 2014 10:06 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had portions of a massive tumor removed in New Mexico is out of intensive care, a spokesman for a church helping the boy said Sunday. Kristean Alcocer of the First Baptist Church of Rio Rancho told The Associated Press that Jose Antonio Ramirez Serrano is recovering after his 11-hour surgery on Nov. 17. ...  

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Study: Affordable Care Act Leaves Many Children Without Important Benefits

December 8, 2014 12:12 pm | Comments

An article published in the Health Affairs December issue is the first ever comprehensive analysis to investigate the Affordable Care Act's Essential Health Benefit (EHB) as it relates to children. The study found that the EHB has resulted in a state-by-state patchwork of coverage for children and adolescents that has significant exclusions, particularly for children with developmental disabilities and other special health care needs. ...

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Hack-A-Thon Attacks Ebola With Robots, Software, Remote Controls

December 8, 2014 11:33 am | by GE Reports.com | Comments

Treating an infectious disease like the Ebola virus is fraught with dangers for both victims and their caretakers. Ebola’s fatality rate can reach 70 percent and an errant drop of blood, vomit or other bodily fluid can turn a nurse or a doctor into a patient. That’s why engineers and technologists started looking for ways that would allow hospital staff to limit their exposure to the virus when treating the sick. ...

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Malnutrition Predictor of Long-Term Survival for Whipple Patients

December 8, 2014 11:06 am | Comments

Malnutrition is an important factor predicting long-term survival in older patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) (commonly called the Whipple procedure) to treat benign tumors and cysts of the pancreas as well as pancreatitis, according to  new study results published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. ...     

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Recent Studies Link Metabolic Syndrome to Urinary Problems

December 8, 2014 10:46 am | Comments

Metabolic syndrome is linked with an increased frequency and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms, but weight loss surgery may lessen these symptoms. The findings, which come from two studies published in BJU International, indicate that urinary problems may be added to the list of issues that can improve with efforts that address altered metabolism.     

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Boy Gets Visit From Officer Who Helped Bring Him to U.S. for Surgery

December 8, 2014 10:20 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

A 9-year-old Afghan boy born with his bladder outside his body got a special visitor at his Pennsylvania school — the Army officer who helped bring him to the United States for corrective surgery. ...         

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Breast Cancer Screening on 'Threshold of an Incredible Exciting Stage'

December 5, 2014 12:22 pm | by GE Reports.com | Comments

Some 40 percent of women in the U.S. have what physicians call “dense breast tissue,” which can mask the visibility of tumors on a traditional mammogram. ...                

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Study: ALS Patients Have More of a Genetic Link Than Previously Thought

December 5, 2014 11:39 am | Comments

Genetics may play a larger role in causing Lou Gehrig's disease than previously believed, potentially accounting for more than one-third of all cases, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic studies to date of patients who suffer from the condition also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. ...    

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3-D Printed Heart Could Reduce Surgeries in Children

December 5, 2014 11:06 am | Comments

New 3D printed heart technology could reduce the number of heart surgeries in children with congenital heart disease, according to Dr. Peter Verschueren who spoke on the topic today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014. ...       

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Twenty-Four Indian Patients Blinded After Cataract Surgery

December 5, 2014 10:31 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

Authorities ordered an investigation Friday after at least 24 poor and elderly people went blind following cataract surgeries performed at a free medical camp run by a charity in northern India. ...           

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Medication Error Killed Woman Following Surgery

December 5, 2014 10:08 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

An Oregon hospital is acknowledging that it administered the wrong medication to a patient, causing her death. ...                                 

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Engineer Applies Robot Control Theory to Improve Prosthetic Legs

December 4, 2014 12:12 pm | Comments

A University of Texas at Dallas professor applied robot control theory to enable powered prosthetics to dynamically respond to the wearer’s environment and help amputees walk. ...                     

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Thirty-Five Hospitals Designated Ebola Treatment Centers

December 4, 2014 11:58 am | Comments

An increasing number of U.S. hospitals are now equipped to treat patients with Ebola, giving nationwide health system Ebola readiness efforts a boost.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state health officials have identified and designated 35 hospitals with Ebola treatment centers, with more expected in the coming weeks. ...

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GE Celebrates Past and Future of Medical Imaging at RSNA Show

December 4, 2014 11:42 am | by GE Reports.com | Comments

Thomas Edison’s light bulb patent was 16 years old when his colleague and GE co-founder Elihu Thomson modified his electric lamp technology and developed an early X-ray machine that allowed doctors to diagnose bone fractures and locate “foreign objects in the body.” The machine, which Thomson built just one year after Wilhelm Roentgen discovered and tested X-rays on his wife, launched GE into the healthcare business. ...

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