Advertisement
News
Subscribe to Surgical Products Magazine News
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Surgical Products Daily

Doctors Remove Knife From Man's Head - Four Years Later

February 18, 2011 4:37 am | Comments

Gillian Wong, AP Surgeons in southern China successfully removed a rusty, 4" (10-centimeter) knife from the skull of a Beijin man who said it had been stuck in there for four years. Li Fuyan, 30, had been suffering from severe headaches, bad breath and breathing difficulties but never knew the cause of his discomfort, said the senior official at the Yuxi City People's Hospital in Yunnan Province.

FDA Approves Lap-Band For Millions More

February 18, 2011 4:23 am | Comments

Matthew Perrone, AP Cosmetic drug and device maker Allergan, Inc. said late Wednesday it received approval to market its stomach-shrinking Lap-Band to millions more patients who are less obese than those currently using the device. The Food and Drug Administration expanded approval to patients with a body mass index between 30 and 40 and one weight-related medical condition, such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

Program Reduces Pressure Ulcers By 70 Percent

February 18, 2011 4:05 am | Comments

Healthcare facilities throughout the country are reporting, on average, a 70 percent reduction in facility-acquired pressure ulcers after implementing Medline Industries' Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP). These same facilities are potentially saving up to $306,000 per year (based on having 7.

Advertisement

Survey: Use Of Temporary Physicians Rising

February 16, 2011 5:02 am | Comments

The use of temporary physicians is rising, underlining the ongoing shortage of doctors nationwide, a new survey suggests. Conducted by Staff Care, a national temporary physician staffing firm and company of AMN Healthcare (NYSE: AHS), the survey polled hospital and medical group managers about their use of temporary physicians, also known as locum tenens.

Where Patients Live Drives Wait For Liver Transplants

February 16, 2011 5:01 am | Comments

Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors dropped another bomb soon after telling Matthew Rosiello it was time for a liver transplant: The 21-year-old isn't likely to get one any time soon in his home state of New York. Consider traveling to Ohio, they advised, where the wait's a lot shorter.

Drug May Slow Growth Of Early Prostate Cancer

February 16, 2011 5:00 am | Comments

Marilynn Marchione, AP Medical Writer A new study suggests a way to help men with early, low-risk prostate cancer avoid being overtreated for a disease that in most cases will never threaten their lives. It found that a drug can slow the growth of these tumors in men who opt to be monitored instead of having treatment right away.

Study Finds Racial Disparities In Hospital Readmission Rates

February 16, 2011 5:00 am | Comments

Elderly Medicare black patients have a higher 30-day hospital readmission rate for several conditions including congestive heart failure and pneumonia compared to white patients, that is related in part to higher readmission rates among hospitals that disproportionately care for black patients, according to a study in the February 16 issue of JAMA .

Study Shows High Imaging Costs For Defensive Purposes

February 16, 2011 4:59 am | Comments

Nearly 35 percent of all the imaging costs ordered for 2,068 orthopaedic patient encounters in Pennsylvania were ordered for defensive purposes, according to a new study presented today at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). For many years now, some physicians have ordered specific diagnostic procedures that are of little or no benefit to a patient, largely to protect themselves from a lawsuit.

Advertisement

Incision-Less Surgery For Heartburn

February 15, 2011 4:16 am | Comments

Approximately 10 percent of the U.S. population suffers from daily heartburn or other symptoms of reflux such as regurgitation, chronic cough, hoarseness and dental erosions. Scott & White Healthcare – Round Rock is offering a new procedure to such patients who meet specific requirements and are generally not doing well on daily Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) medication.

Incision-Less Surgery For Heartbur

February 15, 2011 4:16 am | Comments

Approximately 10 percent of the U.S. population suffers from daily heartburn or other symptoms of reflux such as regurgitation, chronic cough, hoarseness and dental erosions. Scott & White Healthcare – Round Rock is offering a new procedure to such patients who meet specific requirements and are generally not doing well on daily Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) medication.

Woman Gives Fiancé Kidney For Valentine's

February 15, 2011 3:52 am | Comments

(AP) — Not flowers and hearts, but a kidney: A Minnesota man will get a Valentine's Day gift of a lifetime. Ron Spanier and fiance Amy Anderson are preparing for a kidney donation the day after Valentine's Day at the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview. Spanier's been on dialysis since last summer after a disease caused cysts in his kidneys.

Hospital Administrators: Few In Compliance With Language Requirements

February 15, 2011 3:45 am | Comments

A new report, The New Joint Commission Standards for Patient-Centered Care is co-authored by two former language experts/hospital administrators in conjunction with Language Line Services. It calls attention to the lack of compliance with language access requirements for patients with limited English language proficiency.

Harmful Medical Devices Getting Easy Approvals

February 15, 2011 3:32 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP Most medical devices recalled in recent years because of deaths or life-threatening problems were cleared for approval under less stringent regulations that don't require human testing, a recent study found. The report comes as the Food and Drug Administration is reviewing sweeping proposals to revise the medical device approval process.

Egypt's US Envoy Says Mubarak May Be Unwell

February 14, 2011 5:25 am | Comments

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt's ambassador to the United States says Hosni Mubarak may be in "bad health," the first word on the 82-year-old ousted president's health. Speaking Monday on NBC's "Today" program, Sameh Shoukry said he had received information that Mubarak was "possibly in somewhat of bad health.

Few Physicians Refer Patients To Cancer Clinical Trials

February 14, 2011 5:24 am | Comments

A small proportion of adult cancer patients participate in clinical trials in part due to a low level of physician referrals, according to an online study published Feb. 11 in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Although more than 8000 clinical trials are accepting participants, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), only an estimated 2%��% of newly diagnosed cancer patients participate in them.

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading