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Surgical Products Daily

Woman Speaks Again After Voice Box Transplant

January 21, 2011 6:13 am | Comments

Alicia Chang, Juliet Williams, AP A woman whose natural voice could have been silenced forever because of vocal cord damage is able to talk again after undergoing a rare voice box transplant. Brenda Charett Jensen, 52, reunited Thursday with the team of surgeons who performed the delicate operation last October, only the second surgery of its kind performed in the United States.

New Resources Help States Implement Affordable Care Act

January 21, 2011 6:05 am | Comments

Today, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced a new funding opportunity for grants to help states continue their work to implement a key provision of the Affordable Care Act – Health Insurance Exchanges.  When the Affordable Care Act is fully implemented in 2014, Health Insurance Exchanges will provide individuals and small businesses with a “one-stop shop” to find and compare affordable, high-quality health insurance options.

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Better Than The Human Eye

January 19, 2011 5:52 am | Comments

A tiny camera with adjustable zoom could aid endoscopic imaging, robotics and night-vision. January 19, 2011 Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are the first to develop a curvilinear camera, much like the human eye, with the significant feature of a zoom capability, unlike the human eye.

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Pitcher Leaves $12 Million Salary, Avoids Surgery

January 19, 2011 4:58 am | Comments

(AP) — Kansas City Royals pitcher Gil Meche has retired at the age of 32, walking away from a $12 million salary rather than face shoulder surgery that could have ended his season before it ever started. Meche signed a $55 million, five-year deal with Kansas City as a free agent before the 2007 season.

Little Evidence To Support EHR, Most eHealth Technologies

January 19, 2011 4:51 am | Comments

According to a study by Aziz Sheikh (University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland) and colleagues, whish is published in this week's PLoS Medicine , despite the support for eHealth technologies, such as electronic patient records and e-prescribing, the scientific basis of their benefits remains to be firmly established.

Collaboration Results In Annual Healthcare Savings Of $13 Million

January 19, 2011 4:38 am | Comments

A unique collaborative effort among business leaders and health care providers to make Ohio the safest place in the nation for healthcare has led to more than $12.8 million in health care savings, more than 900 fewer patient days spent in the hospital and nearly 3,600 fewer adverse drug events and infections in children.

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Fake ER Valet Steals Patient's Car

January 19, 2011 4:21 am | Comments

(AP) — Police say a fake valet at a Massachusetts emergency room offered to park a pregnant woman's car, then drove away with it. Lowell police Capt. Kelly Richardson tells the Boston Herald that the woman drove herself to Lowell General Hospital at 3 a.m. Friday while suffering labor pains.

Jobs Makes Health Info A Trade Secret

January 19, 2011 4:17 am | Comments

(AP) — It would be easier to gauge Apple CEO Steve Jobs' current medical problems if he had said more about the ones he has faced in the past. Jobs, who turns 56 next month, said Monday that he would take a third leave of absence to focus on his health. It may not be as serious as many fear, but coming from a man who has had cancer and a liver transplant, the lack of detail is causing concern.

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Independent Research Looks To Validate SurgiCount System

January 18, 2011 6:39 am | Comments

Results of a multi-year, independent clinical research study on retained surgical sponges published in the February edition of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety shows that the institution implementing the SurgiCount Safety-Sponge® System eliminated the occurrence of retained surgical sponges and the costs associated with these preventable surgical errors.

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Sleep Evaluation Helps Identify Complications After Kids Tonsil Surgery

January 18, 2011 6:25 am | Comments

Performing polysomnography (a sleep study) prior to pediatric adenotonsillectomy may help identify children at a higher risk of developing post-operative respiratory complications, according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology - Head Neck Surgery , one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Minimally Invasive Technique Helps With Facial Paralysis

January 18, 2011 6:13 am | Comments

A procedure involving one small incision and no major modifications to bone can be used to transpose a tendon and appears helpful in re-animating the lower face after paralysis, according to a report in the January/February issue of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery , one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Errors Lead Surgeons To Contemplate Suicide

January 18, 2011 6:06 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP A study suggests medical errors, job burnout and depression lead surgeons to contemplate suicide at higher rates than the general public, and they're much less likely to seek help. Fear of losing their jobs contributes to surgeons' reluctance to get mental health treatment, according to the study.

New Facility To Test Electronic Health Records Software

January 18, 2011 5:57 am | Comments

The Polytechnic Institute of New York University and Health Data Management , a publication for healthcare IT executives, today announced the launch of a new healthcare software testing facility. Health Data Tech Labs will provide physicians and hospitals with expert, independent reviews of electronic health records (EHR) software.

Researchers Unzip MRSA, Discover Route For Vaccine

January 17, 2011 5:41 am | Comments

University of Rochester Medical Center orthopaedic scientists are a step closer to developing a vaccine to prevent life-threatening methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections following bone and joint surgery. Other MRSA vaccine research has failed to produce a viable option for patients because of the inability to identify an agent that can break through the deadly bacteria's unique armor.

Cancer Survivor Aims To Raze Barriers With App

January 17, 2011 5:34 am | Comments

Marcus Wohlsen, Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In the late 1990s, Marty Tenenbaum was a hotshot e-commerce entrepreneur riding high on the dot-com boom when he noticed a lump on his body. His doctor told him it was nothing, but when he finally had it removed, he learned he had melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

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