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Surgical Products Daily

Surgeon Sues For Legal Fees

July 6, 2010 5:44 am | Comments

A physician’s assistant who sued, alleging a Redding, PA surgeon angrily threw a drill at him in surgery, dropped his lawsuit after the doctor countersued, alleging slander. Now, Dr. Richard Cross is suing his two insurance companies because they’re not picking up the $14,000 legal tab he incurred before the assistant dropped his suit.

Initial Overhaul Provisions Kicking In

July 6, 2010 5:35 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, AP The first stage of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul is expected to provide coverage to about one million uninsured Americans by next year, according to government estimates. That's a small share of the uninsured, but in a shaky economy, experts say it's notable.

EMRs Could Trigger The Need For More Handhelds

July 6, 2010 5:07 am | Comments

Stimulus incentives designed to spur hospitals and physicians to use electronic medical record systems are among several factors that will drive growth of handheld devices in healthcare, according to a new report from healthcare market research publisher Kalorama Information. The report, Handhelds in Healthcare: The World Market for PDAs, Tablet PCs, Handheld Monitors & Scanners , indicates that handheld device sales for healthcare use reached $8.

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Benefits Beyond Weight Loss

July 2, 2010 7:03 am | Comments

One year after weight loss surgery with laparoscopic gastric banding, extremely obese adults demonstrate not only better physical health, but also improved psychological health, a new study presented at The Endocrine Society's 92nd Annual Meeting in San Diego, states. So in addition to helping control Type 2 diabetes, the study offers perspective on how the long-term psychological status of morbidly obese individuals undergoing gastric banding has improved.

Best Practices For Managing A Nursing Shortages

July 2, 2010 6:50 am | Comments

API Healthcare recently issued a set of best practices to help hospitals of all sizes effectively prepare for and manage the challenging repercussions of healthcare reform legislation. Industry experts expect this legislation to generate millions of new patients, create a severe nursing shortage and have a significant financial impact on hospitals and other healthcare providers.

Isolating The Genes That Extend Life

July 2, 2010 6:35 am | Comments

Randolph E. Schmid, AP The oldest among us seem to have chosen their parents well. Researchers closing in on the impact of family versus lifestyle find most people who live to 100 or older share some helpful genes. But don't give up on diet and exercise just yet. In an early step to understanding the pathways that lead to surviving into old age, researchers report in the online edition of Science that a study of centenarians found most had a number of genetic variations in common.

Overhaul May Mean Longer ER Wait

July 2, 2010 6:20 am | Comments

Carla K. Johnson, AP Emergency rooms, the only choice for patients who can't find care elsewhere, may grow even more crowded with longer wait times under the nation's new health law. That might come as a surprise to those who thought getting 32 million more people covered by health insurance would ease ER crowding.

Johns Hopkins Formula Could Improve Kidney Transplant Procedures

July 2, 2010 5:52 am | Comments

Only a small fraction of transplant centers nationwide are willing to accept and transplant deceased-donor kidneys that they perceive as less than perfect, leading to lengthy, organ-damaging delays as officials use a one-by-one approach to find a willing taker. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have designed a formula they say can predict which donor kidneys are most likely to be caught in that process, a method that could potentially stop thousands of usable kidneys each year from being discarded because it took too long for them to be transplanted.

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More Than 2 Billion Lack Surgical Access

July 2, 2010 5:37 am | Comments

More than two billion people worldwide do not have adequate access to surgical treatment, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). A substantial amount of the global burden of disease comes from illnesses and disorders that require surgery, such as complicated childbirth, cancer and injuries from road accidents.

Study Finds New Element To Corneal Transplant Success

July 2, 2010 5:15 am | Comments

Although it is already one of medicine's most successful transplant procedures, doctors continue to seek ways to improve corneal transplants. Now, for the first time, a team of German and British researchers have confirmed that failure and rejection of transplanted corneas are more likely in patients whose eyes exhibit abnormal vessel growth, called corneal neovascularization, prior to surgery.

Stem-Cell Therapy Offers New Approach To Fighting Infection

July 2, 2010 5:02 am | Comments

A new study from researchers in Ottawa and Toronto suggests that a commonly used type of bone marrow stem cell may be able to help treat sepsis. The study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine , shows that these cells can triple survival rates in an experimental model of sepsis.

Premature Baby Survives Liver Transplant

June 30, 2010 9:33 am | Comments

A 2-month-old girl was dying from advanced liver failure when a risky surgery was performed at New York-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital this past February. Surgeons wanted to avoid a liver transplant, but realized the little girl wouldn’t survive without one. Born 10 weeks premature, the tiny infant remained on a respirator until a replacement liver from a two-month-old in Florida became available.

Buffalo Filter Honored For Performance

June 30, 2010 9:16 am | Comments

Buffalo Filter was recently recognized with a Pinnacle Award, presented by the Premier healthcare alliance. The company was recognized for their outstanding management of Premier agreements and drive toward the mutual goal of providing clinical and financial value to the not-for-profit hospitals that are members of the Premier alliance.

Non-Surgical Treatment Can Improve Quality Of Life

June 30, 2010 9:09 am | Comments

A new, effective, non-surgical treatment for uterine fibroids can help women with this condition maintain their fertility, an American scientist told the 26th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Rome. Dr. Alicia Armstrong, Chief, Gynecologic Services, National Institutes of Health (NIH) said that the outcome of two Phase II clinical trials of ulipristal acetate (UPA) had significant implications for both infertility and general gynecology patients.

Better Bionic Eyes and Ears

June 30, 2010 8:58 am | by by Fresh Science, with reporting by Kim Ukura, Associate Editor, Product Design & Development | Comments

A researcher from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has created conductive bioplastics which will transform the performance of bionic devices like the cochlear ear and the proposed bionic eye. “Our plastics will lead to smaller devices that use safer smaller currents and that encourage nerve interaction,” says biomedical engineer Rylie Green.

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