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Surgical Products Daily

Surgical Quality Not Associated With Lower Infection Rates

June 23, 2010 4:06 am | Comments

A study by investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine published in this week's issue of JAMA found that public hospital comparison data reported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services does not accurately correlate with a patient's risk for surgical post-operative infection.

U.S. Last In Health Care System Performance

June 23, 2010 3:46 am | Comments

Despite having the most expensive health care system, the United States trails Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand and the United Kingdom on measures of health system quality, efficiency, access, equity and the ability to lead long, healthy, productive lives, according to a new Commonwealth Fund report.

The Economic Impact Of Hospitals

June 22, 2010 6:50 am | Comments

(AP)  U.S. hospitals support nearly one of nine jobs in the country and more than $2.1 trillion in economic activity, according to a study funded by the industry's trade group. The American Hospital Association report concluded hospitals directly employed nearly 5.4 million people in 2008. That's up from about 4.

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UK Doctor Admits To Helping Patients Die

June 22, 2010 6:43 am | Comments

Raphael G. Satter, AP A British doctor who admitted shortening the lives of nearly 20 patients — including his own son — may face charges. Howard Martin, 75, was cleared in 2005 of murdering three patients with fatal doses of pain killer. He has since had his license revoked. Now a dramatic confession to a national newspaper has prompted police and prosecutors to consider re-opening the case against him.

Oil Spill Stirs Debate Over Health Impacts

June 22, 2010 6:30 am | Comments

Mike Stobbe, AP When an Associated Press reporter went scuba diving in the oil-streaked Gulf of Mexico this month, people commenting on websites worried about his health. But at the same time, the oil sure didn't bother some beachgoers in Alabama. “I was in the water two hours yesterday,” said Robert Theil, a French visitor to Orange Beach, as his sister acted as translator.

Diagnosing Gastric Band Slippage

June 22, 2010 6:10 am | Comments

Standard radiography (X-rays) can help in the diagnosis of laparoscopic adjustable gastric band slippage, a known complication of adjustable gastric banding surgery, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology . As adjustable gastric banding surgery becomes common, more patients are presenting to the emergency department with complications of the procedure, particularly those resulting from slippage of the gastric band.

Swiss Surgeons Report Negatives Of Resident Work Hour Limits

June 22, 2010 5:54 am | Comments

Many Swiss surgical residents and consultants believe recently implemented 50-hour workweek limitations for residents have a negative effect on surgical training and the quality of patient care, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Surgery . “On Jan. 1, 2005, the Swiss government implemented new work hour limitations for all residency programs in Switzerland, and the federal work law became effective for all medical and surgical residents throughout the country,” the authors write.

Judge Offers Malpractice Fix

June 21, 2010 7:37 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, AP To settle medical malpractice lawsuits, Judge Douglas McKeon sometimes quietly listens to heartbroken family members as they vent their anger. He calls it humanness. Curiosity about medical matters led the longtime New York City judge to become a specialist in resolving wrenching cases that involve life-changing harm to patients.

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Judge Offers Malpractice Fix<

June 21, 2010 7:37 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, AP To settle medical malpractice lawsuits, Judge Douglas McKeon sometimes quietly listens to heartbroken family members as they vent their anger. He calls it humanness. Curiosity about medical matters led the longtime New York City judge to become a specialist in resolving wrenching cases that involve life-changing harm to patients.

Lawsuit Fears Lead To More ER Testing

June 21, 2010 7:19 am | Comments

Lindsey Tanner, AP The fear of missing something weighs heavily on every doctor's mind. But the stakes are highest in the ER, and that fear often leads to extra blood tests and imaging scans for what may be harmless ailments. Many ER doctors say the No. 1 reason is fear of malpractice lawsuits.

Senate Fails To Spare Doctors From Medicare Cuts

June 21, 2010 6:42 am | Comments

Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar & Stephen Ohlemacher, AP Last Friday the Senate passed legislation to spare doctors a 21 percent cut in Medicare payments that had been looming for months, but the last-ditch effort came too late. Moments after the Senate acted, Medicare announced it would begin processing claims it has already received for June at the lower rate.

Bariatric Surgery Improves Insulin Sensitivity Better Than Diet

June 21, 2010 6:29 am | Comments

“Our study shows that in the short term, weight loss by diet alone does not achieve the same improvements in diabetes as gastric bypass surgery,” said the author, Judith Korner, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Korner and her colleagues found that gastric bypass surgery better improved insulin sensitivity – the body's ability to successfully clear glucose sugar from the bloodstream into the cells.

Conscious Sedation Shortens Hospital Stays

June 21, 2010 6:04 am | Comments

A new study suggests that the recovery time and cost of brain-tumor surgery could be reduced if surgery is performed while patients are awake during part of the procedure. The study, conducted at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, examined the outcomes of 39 patients treated for glioma, a type of brain tumor that affects about 20,000 Americans annually.

Abuse Of Meds Sends As Many To ER As Illegal Drugs

June 18, 2010 6:55 am | Comments

Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer ATLANTA (AP) — For the first time, abuse of painkillers and other medication is sending as many people to the emergency room as the use of illegal drugs. In 2008, ERS saw an estimated 1 million visits from people abusing prescription or over-the-counter medicines — mostly painkillers and sedatives.

Kidneys Transplanted Between HIV-Infected Patients

June 18, 2010 6:54 am | Comments

Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer ATLANTA (AP) — South African surgeons have transplanted kidneys between donors and patients who were both infected with the AIDS virus — a medical first that has some U.S. doctors buzzing about whether it could be tried here. The first four of the transplants, which occurred in 2008, are described in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

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