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Surgical Products Daily

H1N1 Experts Linked To Pharmaceutical Industry

June 7, 2010 6:09 am | Comments

Key World Health Organization personnel who advised on the stockpiling of pandemic flu drugs had financial ties with companies which stood to profit, an investigation has found. The British Medical Journal says these individuals had openly declared these interests, yet WHO made no mention of the links.

Ablation As Effective As Traditional Surgery

June 4, 2010 6:03 am | Comments

A minimally invasive technique used to destroy kidney tumors with an electrically controlled heating probe showed similar effectiveness as surgical removal of tumors in curbing cancer recurrence rates for up to five years after treatment. In an article available online in the journal Cancer , Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, professor of urology and radiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, reported the outcomes of more than 200 patients who were treated with radiofrequency ablation.

Reimbursement System Stunting MIS Developments

June 4, 2010 5:48 am | Comments

Two decades after the first successful minimally invasive surgery, today’s techniques and technologies are being held back from providing better patient care and more efficient procedures, according to a report issued today by Cambridge Consultants.  The report analyzes the barriers and opportunities for the future growth of the $15 billion global MIS market, with data collected through input from pre-eminent representatives with backgrounds in imaging and navigation, surgical robotics, regulatory affairs, laparoscopy and endoscopy.

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Adding A Finishing Touch To Robotic Surgery

June 4, 2010 5:16 am | Comments

Immersion Corporation, a leading developer and licensor of haptics technology, has announced that SOFAR S.p.A., a leading Italian manufacturer of medical devices for minimally invasive surgery, has obtained a license to Immersion's TouchSense haptics technology for use in its ALF-X (Advanced Laparoscopy through Force Reflection) telesurgical robot system.

Lower Costs, Greater Success With Prompt Gallbladder Removal

June 4, 2010 5:07 am | Comments

New research findings published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons indicate that delaying cholecystectomy, the surgical removal of the gallbladder, in elderly patients with sudden inflammation of the organ often results in increased costs, morbidity and mortality. Gallstone disease is the most costly digestive disease in the United States, with approximately 20 million people having the disorder.

Keyboards Adding To Infection Control Issues

June 4, 2010 4:54 am | Comments

“Contamination was predominantly found in non-treatment areas,” says Angela Pugliese, M.D., lead author of the study and an emergency department physician at Henry Ford Hospital. “This suggests that only areas without true patient contact, and likely less frequent hand washing, might benefit from using washable silicone rubber or antibacterial keyboards instead of a standard keyboard.

SAGES Issues New Practice Guideline

June 2, 2010 7:31 am | Comments

The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) issues a practice guideline addressing the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. June 2, 2010 BARRX Medical Inc. reports that the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) has issued a new practice guideline for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Quitting Smoking Promotes Better Healing After Surgery

June 2, 2010 7:30 am | Comments

A study finds patients who avoid tobacco for six weeks after fracture surgery have fewer postoperative complications June 2, 2010 Smokers who refrain from using tobacco during the six-week period following emergency surgery for an acute fracture heal more quickly and experience fewer complications than patients who continue to smoke during the healing process, according to a study published in the June 2010 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS).

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Craigslist Ad Delivers Kidney Donation

June 2, 2010 7:29 am | by Stephanie Innes, AP | Comments

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Diane White had been living without any kidneys for three months and had been on a transplant waiting list for more than four years when she received a call about a potential donor. Weak and tired from spending nine hours a week in dialysis, White had begun praying more than usual.

Supreme Court To Hear Military Wrongful Death

June 2, 2010 7:29 am | Comments

A woman whose husband died after undergoing a botched surgical procedure was expected to take her medical malpractice/wrongful death case to the Supreme Court. However, the lawsuit was by no means a simple one, based on reports provided by ABC7 News I-Team. Dean Witt, the plaintiff’s late husband, was a staff sergeant at Travis Air Force Base.

High-Tech Births Or Nature's Way?

June 2, 2010 7:28 am | by Story by Josephine Marcotty, Minneapolis Star Tribune | Comments

Dannette Lund wanted to have her second baby the natural way, but she had to flout all the best medical advice to do it. Because she had delivered her first child by Caesarean section, a hospital birth would almost certainly mean surgery again. Home birth? Her midwife refused, saying it was too risky.

Hospital Wins Transplant-Cancer Lawsuit

June 1, 2010 7:57 am | Comments

Jennifer Peltz, AP A prominent organ-transplant hospital wasn't to blame for the death of a man who became riddled with cancer after getting a kidney from a donor who unknowingly had uterine cancer, jurors have found. The Queens jury found for NYU Langone Medical Center in the medical malpractice case surrounding Vincent Liew's 2002 death.

Sugary Band-Aid May Help Post-Op Healing

June 1, 2010 7:41 am | Comments

A compound found in sunless tanning spray may help to heal wounds following surgery, according to new results published by plastic surgeons from New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City and biomedical engineers at Cornell University, where it was developed. Procedures to remove cancerous breast tissue, for example, often leave a hollow space that fills with seroma fluid that must typically be drained by a temporary implanted drain.

New Tonsillectomy Techniques Reduce Complications

June 1, 2010 7:28 am | Comments

In a review of three different surgical techniques commonly used for tonsillectomy, the microdebrider technique (where a rotary cutting tool is used to shave tissue) had the lowest overall complication rate when compared to the other two techniques. The results are shown in new research published in the June issue of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery .

Refusing Cancer Surgery Lowers Survival Rates

June 1, 2010 7:11 am | Comments

Men who refuse surgery for prostate cancer and instead opt for monitoring progression without undergoing treatment have a significantly worse long-term survival rate than those patients that choose radiotherapy, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study found that patients who refused any treatment for their prostate cancer had a 10-year overall survival rate of 51 percent, compared to 68 percent for those who chose radiation treatment.

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