Advertisement
News
Subscribe to Surgical Products Magazine News
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Surgical Products Daily

Going Green In The Hospital

June 11, 2010 6:51 am | Comments

Johns Hopkins researchers say recycling medical equipment saves money, reduces waste and is safe June 11, 2010 Wider adoption of the practice of recycling medical equipment — including laparoscopic ports and durable cutting tools typically tossed out after a single use — could save hospitals hundreds of millions of dollars annually and curb trash at medical centers, the second-largest waste producers in the United States after the food industry.

Self-Amputee Back In Surgery

June 11, 2010 6:12 am | Comments

(AP)  A Connecticut man who tried to amputate his own arm, after being trapped for days while working on his basement furnace, is back in surgery. Jonathan Metz got his arm caught Sunday in his furnace boiler. He was rescued Wednesday, a day after he used his own tools and cut through most of his left arm.

Not A Cure, But Wins Show Progress Against Cancer

June 11, 2010 6:07 am | Comments

Marilynn Marchione, AP Doctors reported gains against nearly every form of cancer at a conference that ended this week. Yet when Will Thomas heard about an advance against prostate cancer, he wanted to know just one thing: “Is it a cure?” “I see billions and billions done on research, and it's all for treatment,” said the Alabama man who has several friends with the disease.

Advertisement

Recession Impacting Hospital Quality

June 11, 2010 5:47 am | Comments

During past recessions, the financial stability of hospitals seemed to be nearly indestructible. But researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and St. Joseph Mercy Health System say the current national economic crisis may be an exception. Hospitals are reporting declining profits, likely as a result of Americans losing health insurance as they lose jobs.

Eyelid Shortcut Offers Less Invasive Surgical Approach

June 11, 2010 5:32 am | Comments

Surgeons at Johns Hopkins have safely and effectively operated inside the brains of a dozen patients by making a small entry incision through the natural creases of an eyelid to reach the skull and deep brain. They say access to the skull and brain through either lid, formally known as a transpalpebral orbitofrontal craniotomy, sharply contrasts with the more laborious, physically damaging and invasive, traditional means of entry used in brain surgery that requires opening the top half of the skull.

Essential Practice Documents Introduced For Wound, Ostomy & Continence Care

June 9, 2010 8:16 am | Comments

  Wound, ostomy and continence care professionals are anticipating the presentation of three essential practice documents at the 2010 Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses (WOCN) Society Joint Conference. The conference, held in conjunction with the World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET), convenes June 12-16, 2010 in Phoenix, AZ.

Leading Heart Surgeon Urges Doctors To Embrace Robotic Surgery

June 9, 2010 8:16 am | Comments

PHILADELPHIA, June 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Dr. Francis Sutter, one of five leaders in the United States in minimally-invasive robotic assisted beating heart coronary bypass surgery has accepted an invitation to speak at the 2010 World Congress of Cardiology and World Heart Federation in Beijing on the topic of robotic heart surgery.

Girl, 3, Undergoes Surgery After Hit At Dodger Stadium

June 9, 2010 8:15 am | Comments

In a statement, officials from Childrens Hospital Los Angeles said they expect Janelle Briseno will be well enough for release by the end of the week. "The surgery went well, and we anticipate a full recovery," said Dr. J. Gordon McComb, the hospital's head of neurosurgery. The accident occurred Monday when Dodgers catcher Russell Martin hit a line drive into the stands near third base, hitting Janelle and knocking her unconscious, said Dodgers spokesman Joe Jareck.

Advertisement

Mississippi Looks To Iran For Rural Health Care Model

June 9, 2010 8:14 am | by Shelia Byrd, Associated Press Writer | Comments

GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) — Scratch-poor towns in the Mississippi Delta once shared more in common with rural Iran — scarce medical supplies, inaccessible health care and high infant mortality rates — than with most of the U.S. Then things in Iran got better. Since the 1980s, rural Iranians have been able to seek treatment at health houses, informal sites set up in small communities as the first stop for medical care, rather than an emergency room.

Study: Lax Infection Control At Surgery Centers

June 9, 2010 8:14 am | Comments

Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer CHICAGO (AP) — A new federal study finds many same-day surgery centers — where patients get such things as foot operations and pain injections — have serious problems with infection control. Failure to wash hands, wear gloves and clean blood glucose meters were among the reported breaches.

New Treatment Approach To Rare Cancer Results In Prolonged Survival

June 8, 2010 7:34 am | Comments

Aggressive treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma has dramatically increased survival in the small group of patients who chose to undergo it. Researchers at Mayo Clinic say a nationwide clinical trial is also planned Aggressive treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma has dramatically increased survival in the small group of patients who chose to undergo it, say physicians at Mayo Clinic.

Clinical Hotline Launched For Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Patients

June 8, 2010 7:34 am | Smith & Nephew, Inc. | Comments

The hotline offers immediate access to product information for patients using the RENASYS™ Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Systems June 8, 2010 The Advanced Wound Management Division of Smith & Nephew, Inc., a subsidiary of Smith & Nephew plc (LSE: SN; NYSE: SNN) announced the launch of its Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) clinical hotline for patients.

Study: Radiation Boosts Prostate Cancer Survival

June 8, 2010 7:29 am | Comments

Marilynn Marchione, AP Medical Writer CHICAGO (AP) — Doctors are reporting a key advance in treating men with cancer that has started to spread beyond the prostate: survival is significantly better if radiation is added to standard hormone treatments. Results of the study were given Sunday at a cancer conference, where other research showed that an experimental drug boosted survival for women with very advanced breast cancer.

Overtreated: Time May Be Best Treatment For Back Pain

June 8, 2010 7:28 am | by Lauran Neergaard AP Medical Writer | Comments

WASHINGTON (AP) — "Why did they cut you?" The shocking question came from a respected spine surgeon tracked down by Keith Swenson, who was still in severe pain after an earlier back operation. He didn't know what to believe. Two other surgeons had urged more operations, different ones.

Doctor Who Took Out Wrong Organ Fined

June 8, 2010 7:27 am | Comments

Health News Florida reports Monday that the board said Bernard Zaragoza is a good doctor, but he had bad luck. A state hearing officer recommended a penalty of a $5,000 fine and 50 hours of community service. Zaragoza has to reimburse the state $25,000 for the state's costs of investigation and prosecution.

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading