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Surgical Products Daily

Mind The Gap: Gown Protects UK Patients' Privacy

March 24, 2010 8:20 am | Comments

Jill Lawless, Associated Press Writer LONDON (AP) — Some good news for hospital patients: a gown that won't let you down. Stylish hospital gowns that snap down the side were unveiled in Britain on Tuesday, intended to replace those shapeless cloth sacks with useless ties that flash open at the worst possible moments.

US Law To Make Calorie Counts Hard To Ignore

March 24, 2010 8:19 am | Comments

Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — A requirement tucked into the massive U.S health care bill will make calorie counts impossible for thousands of restaurants to hide and difficult for consumers to ignore. More than 200,000 fast food and other chain restaurants will have to include calorie counts on menus, menu boards and even drive-throughs.

Stent For Wide-Necked Intracranial Aneurysms Approved In Japan

March 24, 2010 8:19 am | Comments

A new Vascular Reconstruction Device and Delivery System (VRD) is a self-expanding stent used to treat wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. March 24, 2010 Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. (Codman), a global neuroscience and neurovascular company, announces that Johnson & Johnson K.

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Doctors Test New MS Theory As Patients Demand Care Now

March 23, 2010 7:33 am | Comments

Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Under intense pressure from patients, some U.S. doctors are cautiously testing a provocative theory that abnormal blood drainage from the brain may play a role in multiple sclerosis — and that a surgical vein fix might help. If it pans out, the approach suggested by a researcher in Italy could mark a vast change for MS, a disabling neurological disease long blamed on an immune system gone awry.

Poor, Minority Heart Transplant Patients Fare Worse

March 23, 2010 7:33 am | Comments

(Reuters Health) - Lower-income and minority heart transplant recipients may have a poorer long-term outlook than white or more-affluent patients, a new study suggests. In a study of 520 adults and children who received heart transplants at one of four Boston centers between 1996 and 2005, researchers found that those from the most disadvantaged neighborhoods were more likely to die or need a new transplant over the next five years.

Comprehensive Approach Associated With Reduced MRSA

March 23, 2010 7:33 am | Comments

An intensive program of surveillance, precautions, training and feedback in a large multihospital institution appears to be associated with reductions in rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) over a 15-year period, according to a report in the March 22 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Supreme Court Overturns Malpractice Cap

March 23, 2010 7:32 am | Comments

Monday, the Georgia Supreme Court ruled that a controversial law capping the amount of money an injured patient could recover from a negligent medical provider is unconstitutional. The 7-0 decision was written by Justice Hunstein. Senate Bill 3, enacted in 2005, stated that a victim of medical malpractice could be limited in the amount of damages they can receive from a jury verdict, even if the harm caused was catastrophic in nature.

California Doc Charged In Patient Death During Surgery

March 23, 2010 7:32 am | Comments

(AP) An Inglewood surgeon has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter after a patient died during a procedure being carried out in a converted home. The 30-year-old patient, whose name was not released, died after Dr. Roberto Bonilla administered anesthetic ahead of a gallbladder and hernia operation, according to the state attorney general's office, which filed a complaint with the Medical Board of California.

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Study: Lesser-Known Bug A Bigger Hospital Threat

March 22, 2010 8:30 am | Comments

Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer ATLANTA (AP) — As one superbug seems to be fading as a threat in hospitals, another is on the rise, a new study suggests. A dangerous, drug-resistant staph infection called MRSA is often seen as the biggest germ threat to patients in hospitals and other health care facilities.

Employer Healthcare Costs Increase In 2009

March 22, 2010 7:24 am | Comments

WASHINGTON Reuters – Average healthcare costs for U.S. employers rose by 7.3 percent in 2009, surpassing inflation and the growth rate in overall healthcare spending. Overall U.S. healthcare spending, including Medicare, Medicaid, and other payers, grew by 4.8 percent in 2009, the report found.

Botox Over Baghdad

March 22, 2010 7:18 am | Comments

Rebecca Santana, AP Dr. Abbas al-Sahan's patient wasn't a war victim. She didn't have a scar that needed cosmetic surgery. All she wanted was a cute nose. And she got it. Speaking after the surgery, bandages and swelling gone, 23-year-old Sarah Saad Abdul-Hameed was ecstatic. Friends who visited “were surprised with the change in my face,” she said.

C U @ The OR

March 22, 2010 7:02 am | Comments

Sixteen-year-old Annie Levitz was recently diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome – which her doctors attribute to the teen sending over 100 text messages a day to family and friends. She might have to have surgery on both wrists. From the minute school was over to sometimes as late as 11 p.m.

Palestinian Girl Receives Reconstructive Skull Surgery

March 22, 2010 6:40 am | Comments

A year after a little girl from the Gaza Strip was shot in the head and nearly died, surgeons at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center preformed reconstructive surgery. She’s being treated as a charity case for a surgery that will provide the protection she needs to live a normal life. When Israeli tanks rolled into the Gaza Strip last January, six-year-old Noor Thabet and her siblings gathered to take a look.

Medical Center Implements Quality Initiatives, Sees Drop In Mortality Rate

March 19, 2010 7:06 am | Comments

Overall mortality rates from the end of 2007 to the beginning of 2010 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City, FL have dropped from 3.4 to 2.1. A 1.3-point drop represents a huge reduction for any hospital and translates into lives saved. To date, Bay Medical Center's rate for heart attack is down from 15.

New Careers Start With A Good Match Day

March 19, 2010 6:23 am | by Kelly Brewington and Joe Burris, Baltimore Sun reporters | Comments

Nikki Alworth stared at the envelope, then stared again, her eyes scanning the words over and over. She wasn't imagining things. The University of Maryland medical student would remain at the university to begin her career as a doctor in emergency medicine. No need to sell the house in Rodgers Forge.

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