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Surgical Products Daily

Mild Gallstone Pancreatitis: Admit To Medicine or Surgery?

October 10, 2014 10:54 am | Comments

Patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis who were admitted to the surgery service went to the operating room sooner and had shorter hospital stays and lower hospital costs than those admitted to the medicine service, in a new retrospective study ...

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Investigation Into GI Scope-Related Infections Changes National Guidelines

October 9, 2014 12:53 pm | Comments

National guidelines for the cleaning of certain gastrointestinal (GI) scopes are likely to be updated due to findings from UPMC's infection prevention team. The research and updated disinfection technique will be shared Saturday in Philadelphia at ID Week 2014, an annual meeting of health professionals in infectious disease fields ... 

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Study: College Athletes in Contact Sports More Likely to Carry MRSA

October 9, 2014 12:37 pm | Comments

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014™. This puts them at higher risk for infection and increases the likelihood of spreading the bug, which can cause serious and even fatal infections ... 

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Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arms Now a Reality

October 9, 2014 12:14 pm | Comments

For the first time, robotic prostheses controlled via implanted neuromuscular interfaces have become a clinical reality. A novel osseointegrated (bone-anchored) implant system gives patients new opportunities in their daily life and professional activities ...

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Expert Rejects Evidence of Life in Brain-Dead Girl

October 9, 2014 10:52 am | by the Associated Press | Comments

A court-appointed expert has told a California judge he sees no evidence that a 13-year-old girl is alive 10 months after a coroner signed her death certificate. The opinion was provided Monday in the case of Jahi McMath by Stanford University pediatric neurologist Paul Fisher. Jahi was declared brain dead on Dec. 12 after she went into cardiac arrest following surgery to treat sleep apnea ...

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The Risks of Performing Surgery During the Ebola Outbreak

October 9, 2014 10:35 am | by Karen Attiah, The Washington Post | Comments

Beyond the death toll from Ebola across West Africa the outbreak of the deadly virus has also caused serious complications to the provisions of other types of health care. People seeking access to health care for treatment of malaria cannot get help, pregnant women cannot get assistance delivering babies, and people cannot get access to routine immunizations ...

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Out of Africa…again? Infection Control in the Age of Ebola

October 9, 2014 10:06 am | by Dr. Douglas H. McConnell, Medical Director, OBP Medical | Comments

Once again, the medical community is taking notice of a highly contagious pathogen arising in Africa and potentially threatening all of mankind. The Ebola virus has now caused a very real pandemic that is wiping out villages and rapidly crossing borders in African nations. Those nations’ public health and social resources are challenge by this dangerous, aggressive killer ...

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Formerly Conjoined Twin From Panama On Road To Recovery

October 8, 2014 12:08 pm | by Lisa Sigell, CBSLA.com | Comments

A 2-year-old girl from Panama, who underwent surgery at a local hospital in Los Angeles, is on the road to recovery. Ana Paula was born a conjoined twin and underwent an operation 20 days later, which killed her twin and left her with a third leg and acute medical complications that could not be treated in her home country ...

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Universal Screening For MRSA May Be Too Costly

October 8, 2014 11:49 am | Comments

Numerous experts and policy makers have called for hospitals to screen patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and isolate anyone testing positive to prevent the spread of these so-called "Superbugs" in healthcare settings. Several states have enacted laws requiring patients be screened for MRSA upon admission ... 

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Robotic Surgery: More Complications, Higher Expense For Some Conditions

October 8, 2014 11:30 am | Comments

For benign gynecologic conditions, robot-assisted surgery involves more complications during surgery and may be significantly more expensive than conventional laparoscopic surgery, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The results were published online today in Obstetrics & Gynecology ...

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ACS Releases New Edition of Resources for Optimal Care

October 8, 2014 10:46 am | Comments

The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS COT) announced on Monday the release of its 2014 edition of the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient.  Now in its sixth edition, the COT’s Resources document provides the guidelines used by the ACS Verification/Consultation Program to evaluate trauma centers ...

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Siemen's Kulkarni Looks at Future of Hybrid ORs

October 8, 2014 10:22 am | by Surgical Products Staff | Comments

In the September-October print issue of Surgical Products, our cover story focused on technology and patient care solutions driving Hybrid OR integration. Continuing this week, SP is running standalone Q&As from interviews related to our cover story. Today we feature Sudhir Kulkarni, segment director of hybrid OR, Siemens Healthcare ...

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Study: New Device Can Slow, Reverse Heart Failure

October 7, 2014 1:27 pm | Comments

A new, implantable device to control heart failure is showing promising results in the first trial to determine safety and effectiveness in patients, according to lead researcher Dr. William Abraham of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Results of the study are published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology Heart Failure ... 

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Patients Report Waking During Surgery But Unable To Tell Doctors

October 7, 2014 1:15 pm | by Clare Wilson, The Washington Post | Comments

If you’re facing surgery, this may well be your worst nightmare: waking up while under the knife without medical staff realizing. The biggest-ever study of this phenomenon is shedding light on what such an experience feels like and is causing debate about how best to prevent it ...

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Older Workers Turning To Plastic Surgery To Enhance Image

October 7, 2014 1:00 pm | by Alix Pianin, The Fiscal Times | Comments

With a growing number of baby boomers postponing retirement, venturing back into the job market, or striving to retain their standing at work, more and more seniors are turning to cosmetic enhancements to gain a competitive edge in the workforce ...

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