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NY Hospital Patient Burnt, Injured After Electronic Cigarette Fire

April 23, 2014 | Comments

A New York hospital is reinforcing its ban on electronic cigarettes after a patient on oxygen was burned by a fire that erupted while she was puffing on one of the devices. Syracuse Fire Department officials say the exact cause of last month's fire at St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center has not yet been determined. However, hospital officials say the patient had a battery-powered e-cigarette...

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Surgical Products Daily

Study: U.S. Medical Innovation Needs Smarter Incentives To Cut Health Spending

April 22, 2014 11:12 am | Comments

To help rein in massive healthcare spending, a new RAND study concludes that U.S. policy makers should urgently find ways to incentivize pharmaceutical companies and device makers to develop products that produce more value. Instead of examining existing medical technologies and their use, a new study suggests the study identifies options to affect what drugs and medical devices get created in the first place...

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Report Recommends Insurers Use Prescription Monitoring Data To Reduce Opioid Abuse, Deaths

April 22, 2014 11:08 am | Comments

The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Center of Excellence at Brandeis University has issued a ground-breaking report recommending that medical insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce the overdoses, deaths, and healthcare costs associated with abuse of opioids and other prescription drugs...

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Low Tolerance For Pain? The Reason May Be In Your Genes

April 22, 2014 9:45 am | Comments

"Our study is quite significant because it provides an objective way to understand pain and why different individuals have different pain tolerance levels," said study author Tobore Onojjighofia, MD, MPH, with Proove Biosciences and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. "Identifying whether a person has these four genes could help doctors better understand a patient's perception of pain..."

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Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Study IDs Surgical Patients At Risk

April 22, 2014 9:41 am | Comments

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. A study is helping physicians better identify patients most at risk, the first step toward preventing this dangerous and costly surgical complication...

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Gene Variant Raises Risk For Aortic Tear And Rupture

April 21, 2014 10:49 am | Comments

Researchers from Yale School of Medicine and Celera Diagnostics have confirmed the significance of a genetic variant that substantially increases the risk of a frequently fatal thoracic aortic dissection or full rupture. Thoracic aortic aneurysms, or bulges in the artery wall, can develop without pain or other symptoms. If they lead to a tear — dissection — or full rupture, the patient will often die without immediate treatment...

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Stanford Scientists Identify Source Of Most Cases Of Invasive Bladder Cancer

April 21, 2014 10:45 am | Comments

A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Their study, conducted in mice, is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers...

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Study Identifies New Cause Of Brain Bleeding Immediately After Stroke

April 18, 2014 8:25 am | Comments

By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage...

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Formerly Conjoined Twins Leave Dallas Hospital

April 18, 2014 8:13 am | by Jamie Stengle, Associated Press | Comments

Twin boys who were born conjoined have been released from the Dallas hospital that's been their home since birth. Owen and Emmett Ezell were joined at the abdomen and shared a liver and intestines when born. They were separated at Medical City Children's Hospital last August...

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New MRSA Superbug Emerges In Brazil

April 18, 2014 6:57 am | by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Comments

The new superbug is part of a class of highly-resistant bacteria known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, which is a major cause of hospital and community-associated infections. The superbug has also acquired high levels of resistance to vancomycin, the most common and least expensive antibiotic used to treat severe MRSA infections worldwide...

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Research: Adrenaline Does Little To Increase Patient's Survival After Cardiac Arrest

April 17, 2014 10:38 am | Comments

"The vast number of patients who have a cardiac arrest get adrenaline, which has been the drug recommended in treating cardiac arrest for decades," said Dr. Steve Lin, an emergency physician and trauma team leader at Toronto's St. Michael's Hospital. "Yet, despite advances in medical treatment, long-term survival rates of patients who suffer a cardiac outside a hospital and receive adrenaline remains low..."

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AORN Advises One RN Circulator For Every Surgical Patient, Touts Staffing, On-Call Practice Guidelines

April 17, 2014 10:11 am | Comments

Evolving models of healthcare delivery are affecting perioperative nursing practice across diverse settings, prompting AORN to study perioperative nurse staffing issues and to revise an official position statement on “One Perioperative Registered Nurse Circulator Dedicated to Every Patient Undergoing an Operative or Other Invasive Procedure” and an official position statement on “Perioperative Safe Staffing and On-Call Practices...”

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Expect Changes In Appetite, Taste Of Food After Weight-Loss Surgery

April 17, 2014 9:25 am | Comments

Changes in appetite, taste, and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one’s stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. These sensory changes are not all negative, and could lead to more weight loss among patients...

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AORN Foundation, Covidien Team To Offer New Tools For Emerging Nurse Leaders

April 16, 2014 4:55 pm | Comments

In a move aimed at giving nursing professionals the tools they need to address rapidly changing practices and cost structures, the AORN Foundation is teaming with Covidien on an initiative that will provide nurse leaders with a core set of financial and management tools to complement their clinical expertise...

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Researchers Transplant Regenerated Esophagus

April 16, 2014 10:13 am | Comments

Tissue engineering has been used to construct natural oesophagi, which in combination with bone marrow stem cells have been safely and effectively transplanted in rats. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows that the transplanted organs remain patent and display regeneration of nerves, muscles, epithelial cells, and blood vessels...

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Ex-Radiology Tech Filed False Mammogram Results

April 16, 2014 9:58 am | Comments

An ex-radiology technician accused of filing inaccurate mammogram results at a Georgia hospital has pleaded guilty to 10 counts of reckless conduct and a charge of computer forgery. Prosecutors have said 33-year-old Rachael Michelle Rapraeger, of Macon, entered nearly 1,300 negative mammogram results at Perry Hospital between Jan. 22, 2009 and April 1, 2010 that hadn't been reviewed by a radiologist...

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