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Showing Some Spirit

Wed, 04/06/2011 - 5:50am
Amanda Hankel, editor
I am, and always will be, a proud Badger fan. Born and raised in Wisconsin, and a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, the school, its sports teams, the city of Madison and Bucky Badger will always be dear to my heart. Part of why I love UW is how the campus radiates with school spirit. Especially on football Saturdays, the highlight of the fall season in Madison, as a sea of red floods the city's downtown, and excited fans go crazy for the game.

I am, and always will be, a proud Badger fan. Born and raised in Wisconsin, and a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, the school, its sports teams, the city of Madison and Bucky Badger will always be dear to my heart. Part of why I love UW is how the campus radiates with school spirit. Especially on football Saturdays, the highlight of the fall season in Madison, as a sea of red floods the city's downtown, and excited fans go crazy for the game.

At an industry event last week, I met a colleague who had graduated from Penn State University. After we learned that we were alumni of opposing Big Ten schools, he said, “Wisconsin – they’re almost as crazy as Penn State!”

“Excuse me?!? No one is as crazy as Wisconsin,” I thought. My Wisconsin pride showed through.
It got me thinking about the pride we often feel for a particular organization — whether it’s for a specific college, or, say, a hospital in which one works. In my time here as the editor of Surgical Products, I’ve had many conversations with surgeons, OR staff and hospital members who’ve talked with great pride about their surgical facility. Surgical professionals have told me about how their hospital is at the forefront of surgical advancement, or leading the way in new procedures, technology or processes.

It’s true that there are many impressive surgical facilities in this country, and in the world. In the April issue of Surgical Products, we can see the effects a great facility can have on surgeons, technology and patient care by reading about the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, WA, which opened the first integrated robotic surgical suite. This allows their surgeons to perform more advanced, minimally invasive surgeries. At Summa Health System in Akron, OH, the facility is taking robotics to a whole new level by implementing a new robotic training curriculum for its residents.

Also in the issue is a story about Kathleen Winfield, a sterile processing manager at Lexington Medical Center. She’s making great strides on the environmental and cost-savings front, and being recognized for her individual outstanding efforts. Yet, when she talks about the facility in which she works, she humbly says, “I work for the best place in the world.” She says she’s just one of many hospital employees working hard to achieve this mission, and it makes the hospital a great place to work.

There are hospitals all across the country making great, amazing improvements to surgical care. From new procedures to technology to being green, hospitals and their surgical departments constantly work to make a difference in the surgical community for their patients and their employees, and they should be proud of their accomplishments.

In fact, to recognize hospitals and ORs working to make a difference, Surgical Products is hosting our first annual OR of the Year Award. Go to www.surgicalproductsmag.com/2011OR to nominate a facility. It’s your chance to go ‘crazy’ for your OR, to show off what you and your colleagues have all worked so hard to accomplish, and to radiate a little spirit for the surgical facility that you put so much hard work into making great.

Are you proud of your surgical facility? Do you and your colleagues work to make it great? Nominate your facility for OR of the Year here, or send an email describing it's unique benefits, along with any images that might help further demonstrate its qualities, to amanda.hankel@advantagemedia.com. Use the subject line: OR Of The Year.

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