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The Lead

Females Ignored in Basic Medical Research

August 28, 2014 11:47 am | News | Comments

A new study from Northwestern Medicine® has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research. Editors of the five major surgical journals reviewed in this study have responded to this finding and will now require authors to state the sex of animals and cells used in their studies.

Surgical Products Welcomes a New Editor

August 27, 2014 11:00 am | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | News | Comments

In late July, I became editor of Surgical Products. I went from covering village board meetings...

With Coverage Through Obamacare, Transgender Woman Opts For Surgery

August 26, 2014 12:03 pm | by Anna Gorman, Kaiser Health News | News | Comments

Devin Payne had gone years without health insurance – having little need and not much money...

Heart Surgery Can Increase Depression Risk

August 25, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

No one knows what led Robin Williams to kill himself. It wasn’t just one thing, but likely a...

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Woman Has Surgery to Turn Nipples Into Hearts

August 22, 2014 3:50 pm | News | Comments

A woman from England has spent 15 years and £130,000 on surgery to make her look like a holiday caricature – even having her nipples tattooed as hearts. Krystina Butel, 30, began her extreme transformation after having a caricature of herself drawn while on holiday in Ibiza when she was 15.

Extracorporeal Support Can Signifcantly Increase Organs Available for Transplant

August 22, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Using heart-lung support technology, the University of Michigan’s Transplant Center increased the number of kidneys, livers and pancreases available for transplant by about 20 percent.  The results were published in the journal Transplantation and detail the impact of more than 10 years of using Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, or ECMO, to improve the quality and viability of organs donated after circulatory determination of death.

GameStop CEO Had Surgery to Remove Cancerous Brain Tumor

August 20, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

GameStop Corp., the largest specialty retailer of video games, said Chief Executive Officer Paul Raines underwent surgery to identify and remove a small cancerous tumor from his brain. The tumor, located in “an easily accessible” part of the brain, was found early and doctors said his prospects to make a full recovery are good, the company said in a filing today. Raines, 50, will now undergo preventative chemotherapy.

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Palmer Has Successful Pacemaker Implant Surgery

August 19, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

The GOLF Channel reported that golf legend Arnold Palmer had a pacemaker implanted Monday in Pittsburgh and is resting comfortably, according to a Facebook post on the Arnold Palmer Invitational page and on his own website. Palmer, one of golf's all-time greats, will turn 85 on Sept. 10.

Violinist Plays Through Brain Surgery

August 18, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

When Roger Frisch noticed hand tremors back in 2009, it was no small deal - as a professional violinist, steady hands are absolutely imperative to his work. The solution? Deep brain stimulation, to be administered by brain surgeons at the Mayo Clinic Neural Engineering Lab.

Couple Married Nearly 74 Years Has Life-Saving Surgery on Same Day

August 14, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

For nearly 74 years, Raymond and Maizie Huggins have done everything together. And that wasn’t about to change just because they needed heart surgery. The Huggins, both in their 90s, suffered from coronary artery disease. Like everything else in their life, the couple had their surgeries together this week, reported KTLA 5 News in Cleveland.

Open-Heart Surgery Could Have Triggered Robin Williams' Depression

August 13, 2014 12:28 pm | News | Comments

Robin Williams' 2009 open-heart surgery could have contributed to the late star's demise, possibly serving as a trigger to the comedian's downward spiral to severe depression. "Open-heart surgery has historically been known to affect a person's cognitive functioning following recovery," Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, chief of psychiatry at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia, told the New York Daily News.

Hopkins To Pay $190M After Doc Taped Pelvic Exams

July 23, 2014 9:56 am | by Juliet Linderman, Associated Press | News | Comments

A "rogue" gynecologist's secret use of tiny cameras to record hundreds of videos and photos of his patients' sex organs has led to a $190 million settlement with some 8,000 women and girls, lawyers said Monday...            

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Why The VA Scandal Is A Red Flag For Single-Payer Advocates

July 21, 2014 10:33 am | by Kevin Pho, MD | Blogs | Comments

Some are eager to link the VA scandal to Obamacare, and more broadly, government-run health care. Others extol the virtues of the VA, holding it as an ideal of what our health care system should look like...           

New Technique Uses 'Simulated' Human Heart To Screen Drugs

July 21, 2014 10:23 am | by Coventry University | News | Comments

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way – using samples of beating heart tissue – to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials...                 

Orbis Launches Seventh Flying Eye Hospital Program In Mongolia

July 21, 2014 9:23 am | by Orbis | News | Comments

The Orbis Flying Eye Hospital is visiting Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia for the seventh time to conduct an intensive and comprehensive training and skills exchange program aimed at strengthening ophthalmic services in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia...          

New Research Leads to New Tests and Targeted Treatments for Crohn's Disease

July 16, 2014 1:16 pm | by Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America | News | Comments

Specific types of bacteria and accompanying gene expression patterns in the small intestine affect the development and progression of inflammatory bowel (IBD) diseases in children...                    

It’s Very Difficult To Assess A Doctor’s True Skill Or Performance

July 16, 2014 11:41 am | by Robert Pearl, Md | Blogs | Comments

I often start by asking participants to raise their hands if they receive excellent healthcare. Each time I ask, about 90% of the hands in the room shoot up. But all the hands come down when I ask, “How do you know?”...         

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New Hope For Treatment Of Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 11:00 am | by Douglas Mental Health University Institute | News | Comments

A new discovery by Judes Poirier and his team at Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montreal (Canada) opens new avenues for treatment against this devastating disease...               

Four Lessons For Effective, Efficient Research In Healthcare Settings

July 16, 2014 9:58 am | by University of Colorado Denver | News | Comments

Thousands of studies take place every year in healthcare settings. A report published recently in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine describes how to do many of these studies more rapidly...              

Live Kidney Donors Face 'Pointless' Insurance Troubles

July 16, 2014 9:20 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Healthy living kidney donors often face pointless post-donation hurdles when seeking or changing health or life insurance, according to results of a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers...                   

History Of Stroke Increase Risks Of Adverse Outcomes After Surgery

July 16, 2014 9:10 am | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

In an analysis that included more than 480,000 patients who underwent elective noncardiac surgery, a history of stroke was associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and death...            

Researchers Identify Disease That May Have Plagued 700-Year-Old Skeleton

July 15, 2014 10:14 am | by American Society for Microbiology | News | Comments

European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village...                         

States Told To Find Way To Clear Medicaid Backlog

July 15, 2014 10:09 am | by Judy Lin, Associated Press | News | Comments

A half-dozen states with backlogs for Medicaid enrollees were facing a federal deadline Monday to create plans for getting those low-income residents enrolled in health coverage...                     

Doctors Attach Ear To Girl Mauled By Raccoon

July 15, 2014 9:54 am | by ABC News | Videos | Comments

When Charlotte Ponce was a baby, a raccoon crawled into her crib. The raccoon left her with a mauled face, which, over the years, doctors have been repairing...                               

A Critical Question For Doctors: What Is Health?

July 15, 2014 9:38 am | by Dr. Jocelyn Lowinger | Blogs | Comments

Recently I went to a physician and left pondering the question: “What is health anyway?” This is an interesting question, especially one for a doctor to ask...                         

Penn Researchers Successfully Alleviate Pulmonary Inflammation

July 15, 2014 9:07 am | by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine | News | Comments

Pulmonary inflammation can cause shallow breathing and the lungs to become brittle in patients who experience multiple blood transfusions, sepsis, lung surgery and acute lung trauma. To date, no medication has been successful at preventing or mitigating the damage caused by lung inflammation...

Some Require Tommy John Surgery Before Major Leagues

July 14, 2014 9:32 am | by Ronald Blum, AP Sports Writer | News | Comments

Sitting in the Minnesota Twins locker room Sunday surrounded by many of the most promising minor leaguers, Christian Binford remembered back five years ago, when he was a 10th grader pitching for the Mercersburg Academy in Pennsylvania...

FDA Weighs Cancer Risk Of Fibroid Removal Devices

July 14, 2014 9:26 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

Federal health advisers say there is little to no evidence that a popular technique for removing fibroids can be performed without the risk of spreading undetected cancers to other parts of the body...                

Electromedical Products International Inc. Reclassifies CES Devices

July 14, 2014 9:24 am | by Electromedical Products International, Inc | News | Comments

Electromedical Products International, Inc. has reclassified cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) devices from a class III to a class II...                                  

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