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Sutures Or Staples? The Best Choice For Closing A C-Section

July 7, 2014 11:18 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

In the largest study to date comparing sutures (stitches) versus surgical staples for closing a C-section, researchers found a 57 percent decrease in wound complications in women who were sutured versus those who received staples...               

Personalized Brain Tumor Vaccine Helps Patients Live Longer

July 7, 2014 9:22 am | by Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

Patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and treated with an experimental...

'Nanojuice' Could Improve How Doctors Examine The Gut

July 7, 2014 9:18 am | by University at Buffalo | News | Comments

Located deep in the human gut, the small intestine is not easy to examine. X-rays, MRIs and...

Sam's Journey With Epilepsy Surgery

July 2, 2014 12:48 pm | Videos | Comments

In fifth grade, Sam was diagnosed with a brain tumor accompanied by seizures. Even after a...

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Aurora Spine Announces First Surgery Using TiNano Interbody Cage

July 2, 2014 12:33 pm | by Marketwired | News | Comments

Aurora Spine Corporation announced today the first surgery using the Discovery™ interbody cage with TiNano™ plasma spray coating. The surgery, a multi-level case, was performed at Tri-City Medical Center in Oceanside, CA by Dr. Neville Alleyne...

Unapproved Device Buys Time For New Pair Of Lungs

July 2, 2014 12:14 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Jon Sacker was near death, too sick for doctors to attempt the double lung transplant he so desperately needed. His only chance: An experimental machine that essentially works like dialysis for the lungs...                                

NIH Creates Network To Tackle Mysterious Diseases

July 2, 2014 12:06 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The government is expanding its "mystery disease" program, funding a network at six universities around the country to help diagnose patients with diseases so rare they've been told they're undiagnosable...                

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DIY Plastic Surgery Leads To Horrific Injuries

July 2, 2014 12:03 pm | by CNN | Videos | Comments

Apryl Brown lived a life as a successful hair stylist, owning a salon. When she was not working at her shop, she was raising her two daughters...                                                  

Squid Sucker Ring Teeth Material Could Aid Reconstructive Surgery

July 2, 2014 10:48 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers report that the proteins in these teeth could form the basis for a new generation of strong, but malleable, materials that could someday be used for reconstructive surgery, eco-friendly packaging and many other applications...

First Order For Renaissance System With Brain Module

July 2, 2014 10:18 am | by Mazor Robotics Ltd. | News | Comments

Mazor Robotics Ltd., a developer of innovative guidance systems and complementary products, announced today that it has received the first order for its Renaissance system since the commercial launch of the brain surgery module...     

Cuts To Unnecessary Blood Testing Bring Decreases In Healthcare Spending

July 2, 2014 9:11 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center used two relatively simple tactics to significantly reduce the number of unnecessary blood tests to assess symptoms of heart attack and chest pain and to achieve a large decrease in patient charges...

Weekend Emergency Surgeries Deadlier For Children

July 2, 2014 9:04 am | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Children who undergo simple emergency surgeries, such as hernia repairs or appendix removals, on weekends are more likely to suffer complications and even die when compared to children getting the same kind of treatment during the week, according to results of a Johns Hopkins Children's Center study...

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Researchers Seek To Tackle Transplant Tolerance Using Patients' Own T Cells

July 1, 2014 10:31 am | by Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

The first-in-human, Phase I clinical trial, known as TRACT (T-regs for adoptive cell transfer), recently enrolled its first three participants in late May at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and was granted approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March, 2014...

Improving The Quality Of Surgical Care In Rural Communities

July 1, 2014 9:40 am | by American College of Surgeons | News | Comments

On Friday, June 27, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) hosted the ACS Surgical Healthcare Quality Forum Iowa, featuring a panel of healthcare leaders who shared insights into the unique healthcare issues that rural areas face today, including workforce shortages, quality education and training for the next generation of rural surgeons, and access to trauma care...

Surgery For Liver Metastatic Melanoma Could Improve Survival

July 1, 2014 9:28 am | by American College of Surgeons | News | Comments

Surgical resection markedly improves survival among metastatic melanoma patients whose disease is isolated to a few areas in the liver, according to new study findings published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons...

New Research Study Shows Huge Savings For Healthcare

July 1, 2014 9:10 am | by Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research | News | Comments

Recently published findings in Annals of Internal Medicine by Steven Lipshultz, M.D., Wayne State University professor and pediatrician-in-chief at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, and colleagues could help to reduce health care charges while also protecting childhood cancer survivors from heart ailments caused by drug therapy...

App Could Reduce Tommy John Surgeries By 60 Percent

June 30, 2014 10:54 am | by Abracadabra Health LLC | News | Comments

Throw Like a Pro, an application that helps baseball players reduce the likelihood of throwing injuries, is available for download on the App Store. The app provides knowledge of Dr. James Andrews and Dr. Kevin Wilk, two of the world’s foremost experts on overuse injuries in baseball...

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Half of German Hospitals Unable To Invest In New Treatments, Equipment

June 30, 2014 10:24 am | by Accenture | News | Comments

Due to increasing financial challenges, one-in-two German hospitals were unable to make investments in new initiatives during 2012, according to new research released at the 2014 Capital Congress in Berlin...             

It May Take Guts To Cure Diabetes

June 30, 2014 10:16 am | by Columbia University Medical Center | News | Comments

By switching off a single gene, scientists at Columbia University's Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person's GI tract to produce insulin...

Variants Found That Increase Pain After Childhood Surgery

June 30, 2014 9:26 am | by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia | News | Comments

In the first genome-wide analysis of postsurgical pain in children, pediatric researchers identified variations in genes that affect a child's need for pain-control drugs. The findings suggest that at some point physicians may calibrate pain-medication dosages according to a child's individual genetic makeup...

New Protocol Could Extend Preservation Of Donor Livers

June 30, 2014 9:14 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | News | Comments

A system developed by investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Engineering in Medicine allowed successful transplantation of rat livers after preservation for as long as four days, more than tripling the length of time organs currently can be preserved...

Increased Nearsightedness Linked To Higher Education Levels And More Years Spent In School

June 26, 2014 10:32 am | by American Academy of Ophthalmology | News | Comments

German researchers have found strong evidence that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia...         

Doctors Overlook Positive Impacts Of Healthy Building Design, Construction, And Maintenance

June 26, 2014 9:36 am | by McGraw Hill Construction | News | Comments

The critical connection between a healthy building environment and patient health is often missed by the one group of professionals who may matter most - physicians, according to a new SmartMarket report by McGraw Hill Construction, sponsored by the American Institute of Architects and United Technologies...

Continued Use Of Low-Dose Aspirin May Lower Pancreatic Cancer Risk

June 26, 2014 9:12 am | by American Association for Cancer Research | News | Comments

The longer a person took low-dose aspirin, the lower his or her risk for developing pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research...

French Doctor Acquitted For Helping Seven Patients Die

June 25, 2014 9:55 am | by Lori Hinnant, Associated Press | News | Comments

A French doctor was acquitted Wednesday of poisoning charges after giving lethal injections to help seven terminally ill patients die, adding urgency to the growing debate on who can decide when a person is beyond treatment...        

Current Standard Of Care For Flesh-Eating Bacteria Is "Tragically Inadequate"

June 25, 2014 9:47 am | by National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation | News | Comments

The National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation (NNFF) today announced a campaign to raise awareness of the tragic inadequacy of the current standard of care for necrotizing fasciitis, or 'flesh-eating' infection —and to push for the adoption of new treatments for this deadly condition...

Patent Issued To Exthera Medical, Whose Seraph Technology Is Designed To Combat Drug-Resistant ‘Superbugs’

June 25, 2014 9:37 am | by ExThera Medical | News | Comments

ExThera Medical Corporation announced today that U.S. Patent No. 8,758,286 has been issued to the Company relating to its Seraph Microbind Affinity Blood Filter (Seraph). ExThera Medical also announced that it has listed an executive summary of its business at www.HealthiosXchange (H/X), an equity-based portal for accredited investors that raises funds under Rule 506 (b)...

Successful Surgery After Wrong Cancer Diagnosis

June 25, 2014 9:24 am | by Bruce Schreiner, Associated Press | News | Comments

A Kentucky medical team has painstakingly repaired the disfiguring injuries to a woman's face, caused by radiation treatments for a cancer she never had that caused a gaping hole in her cheek and made her an outcast in a former Soviet republic...

To Advance Care For Brain Metastases: Reject These 5 Myths

June 25, 2014 9:03 am | by NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine | News | Comments

A blue-ribbon team of national experts on brain cancer says that professional pessimism and out-of-date "myths," rather than current science, are guiding -- and compromising -- the care of patients with cancers that spread to the brain...

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