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Study: Elderly Face No Added Risk From Cosmetic Surgery

October 31, 2014 10:39 am | by Josh Brown, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Senior citizens are at no higher risk for complications from cosmetic surgery than younger patients, according to a recent study by plastic surgeons at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The doctors analyzed data from more than 129,000 patients during a five-year period and found no significant difference in the rate of complications for individuals older or younger than 65 ...

Incisionless Procedure Improves Long-Term GERD Symptoms

October 30, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

EndoGastric Solutions (EGS) announced publication of US registry data showing that long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) sufferers who underwent an incisionless procedure maintained symptom relief without the need to take proton pump inhibitor medicines for two years ...

Mild Depressive Symptoms Weaken Spinal Stenosis Surgery Outcome

October 30, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Patients with depressive symptoms had a weaker functional capacity post-surgery even five years after surgery ...

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Patients Do Better After Surgery If They 'Prehab'

October 30, 2014 11:02 am | by Katherine Hobson, NPR | News | Comments

People are often told to follow a rehabilitation program following surgery to speed recovery. But starting weeks before going under the knife might help them regain function even faster. So-called "prehabilitation" to prepare someone for an upcoming stressful event has been used quite a bit in orthopedic surgery, Dr. Julie Silver, a physiatrist at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, tells Shots ...

Breast And Colorectal Cancers Remain More Aggressive in Children

October 30, 2014 10:24 am | News | Comments

Breast and colorectal cancers rarely occur in children, but when they do, these conditions are more precarious, according to a pair of National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) studies presented this week at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons ... 

Prostate Cancer Medications Linked to Heart-Related Causes

October 29, 2014 8:32 am | News | Comments

A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Published in BJU International, the findings will help doctors and patients weigh the benefits and risks of the drugs.

Most Internet Sources on Prostate Cancer Disagree With Expert Panel

October 29, 2014 8:24 am | News | Comments

Only 17 percent of top-ranked consumer health websites advise against screening for prostate cancer, a recommendation made more than two years ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), according to a study presented at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Many Older Patients Would Benefit From Palliative Care

October 27, 2014 9:14 pm | News | Comments

Half of older adults who sustain injuries severe enough that they could die in the hospital or become unable to function independently are not asked in the intensive care unit (ICU) if they wish to speak with palliative care specialists about their preferences for end-of-life care, a new study finds ...

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Study: Millions of Unused Medical Supplies in U.S. Operating Rooms Each Year

October 27, 2014 8:49 pm | News | Comments

A Johns Hopkins research team reports that major hospitals across the U.S. collectively throw away at least $15 million a year in unused operating room surgical supplies that could be salvaged and used to ease critical shortages, improve surgical care and boost public health in developing countries ...

Only Six Percent of U.S. Hospitals Ready For Ebola Patient

October 27, 2014 12:43 am | News | Comments

Only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at U.S. hospitals conducted October 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

Volunteer Guidelines For Clinicians in the Ebola Epidemic

October 24, 2014 12:49 pm | News | Comments

Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness Journal has released a novel, informative article that speaks to volunteers within the Ebola epidemic. The article, contributed by a consortium of Boston-based hospitals, is entitled Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak ...

How To Grow a Blood Vessel in a Week

October 24, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

Just three years ago, a patient at Sahlgrenska University Hospital received a blood vessel transplant grown from her own stem cells. Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, Professor of Transplantation Biology at Sahlgrenska Academy, and Michael Olausson, Surgeon/Medical Director of the Transplant Center and Professor at Sahlgrenska Academy, came up with the idea, planned and carried out the procedure ...

For Brain Hemorrhage, Risk of Death is Lower at High-Volume Hospitals

October 24, 2014 10:31 am | News | Comments

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health ...

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Study: Readmission After Colorectal Cancer Surgery a Quality Measure

October 23, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

No significant variation was found in hospital readmission rates after colorectal cancer surgery when the data was adjusted to account for patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses and operation types, which may prompt questions about the use of readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality ...

New Treatment Resolves Hazardous Airway Complication for Child

October 22, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

A case study published recently in the journal Pediatrics describes an innovative, minimally invasive procedure that treated plastic bronchitis, a potentially life-threatening disease, in a six-year-old boy with a heart condition. Using new lymphatic imaging tools and catheterization techniques, physician-researchers eliminated bronchial casts, which are an accumulation of lymphatic material that clogged the child's airway ...

Getting Healthier Before Surgery Gives Patients Jump Start on Recovery

October 22, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

Following a conditioning, nutritional, and relaxation program before surgery is more helpful than waiting until after surgery to rehabilitate. Colorectal cancer patients who participated in a "prehabilitation" program before surgery recovered more quickly than those who only did traditional rehabilitation afterward, according to research published in Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. 

UC Davis Awarded $1.5M to Innovate Robotic Surgery for Head and Neck Cancers

October 22, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded UC Davis principal investigators Laura Marcu and Gregory Farwell $1.5 million to adapt UC Davis-developed biophotonic technology to a robotic surgical device in hopes of dramatically improving the precision of head and neck cancer surgery. This innovation aims to preserve a patient’s quality of life and improve survival rates ...

Meet The Man Who's Using Physics To Make Surgery Safer

October 21, 2014 11:38 am | by Chase Peterson-Withorn, Forbes | News | Comments

For those of us who remember Capri Suns, we undoubtedly recall struggling to insert the straw without piercing the back of the pouch. Believe it or not, the same thing occurs in surgery, according to Nikolai Begg, and it’s been a problem for over a century ...

Paralyzed Man Walks Again After Pioneering Surgery

October 21, 2014 10:19 am | by Ben Quinn, The Guardian | News | Comments

A man who was completely paralyzed from the waist down can walk again after a British-funded surgical breakthrough which offers hope to millions of people who are disabled by spinal cord injuries. Polish surgeons used nerve-supporting cells from the nose of Darek Fidyka, a Bulgarian man who was injured four years ago, to provide pathways along which the broken tissue was able to grow ...

HHS Accelerates Development of Ebola Vaccine

October 17, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

The development of a vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will be accelerated with support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Under a one-year contract with Profectus BioSciences Inc., ASPR’s Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority will provide approximately $5.8 million in funding ...

Pre-Eclampsia May Be Caused By Fetus, Not Placenta

October 16, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) ...

Engineers Design Robot for Brain Surgery Through Cheek

October 16, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of Vanderbilt engineers wondered: Is it possible to address epileptic seizures in a less invasive way?

More Women Opting for Reconstruction Surgery

October 15, 2014 12:02 pm | by Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter | News | Comments

A growing number of breast cancer patients in the United States are having breast reconstruction surgery immediately after breast removal (mastectomy), a new study shows. This steady increase over the past 15 years is especially notable among women who were once considered too high-risk for breast reconstruction surgery, including those aged 65 and older ...

New Treatment Designed to Save More Eyes From Cancer

October 15, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

Doctors at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have developed a new technique for treating the eye cancer retinoblastoma to improve the odds for preventing eye loss, blindness or death in children with advanced forms of the disease ...

TheraNova Introduces Canary Catheter

October 14, 2014 10:37 am | Product Releases | Comments

TheraNova, LLC, a medical device development company creating practical medical solutions, announces the development of a minimally invasive Canary™ Catheter sepsis detection and treatment technology ...

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