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Quintero Talks About Hybrid OR Integration

September 23, 2014 11:28 am | by Surgical Products Staff | News | Comments

In the September-October print issue of Surgical Products, our cover story focused on technology and patient care solutions driving hybrid OR integration. This week, SP will run standalone Q&As from interviews related to our cover story. Today we feature Raoul Quintero, Regional President and CEO, North America, Maquet Medical Systems USA .

One-Year Outcomes Good For Patients Treated With Superficial Femoral Artery Stent

September 22, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

The use of stents has improved management and outcomes of coronary artery disease, and clinical trials are attempting to prove the same will be true for superficial femoral artery disease. Randomized trials have shown favorable results for self-expanding nitinol stents compared with balloon angioplasty. A new report seeks to test this treatment in a real-world population of patients enrolled in an observational registry.

New Guidelines For Managing Peri- And Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation

September 22, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. The guidelines are published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

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Study: Exercise Boosts Tumor-Fighting Ability of Chemotherapy

September 19, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Their work, performed in a mouse model of melanoma, found that combining exercise with chemotherapy shrunk tumors more than chemotherapy alone.

Experts Issue Plea For Better Research And Education For Advanced Breast Cancer

September 19, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

Breast cancer experts around the world have issued a plea to researchers, academics, drug companies, funders and advocates to carry out high quality research and clinical trials for advanced breast cancer, a disease which is almost always fatal and for which there are many unanswered questions.

Researcher: Use of Anti-Inflammatory Medicines After Common Eye Surgery Isn’t Necessary

September 18, 2014 10:28 am | News | Comments

New research led by Queen’s University professor Robert Campbell (Ophthalmology) has revealed using anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery is not helpful or necessary. Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness in the world and about 400,000 Canadians are afflicted with the disease, which is mainly caused by pressure within the eye being high enough to damage the optic nerve.

Select Group of Lung Cancer Patients Achieve Long-Term Survival After Aggressive Treatments

September 16, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

A large, international analysis of patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indicates that a patient's overall survival rate can be related to factors including the timing of when metastases develop and lymph node involvement, and that aggressive treatment for "low-risk" patients leads to a five-year OS rate of 47.8 percent, according to research presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's Annual Meeting.

July/August 2014

September 15, 2014 4:23 pm | by Surgical Products Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

This is the digital version of the July/August 2014 issue of Surgical Products magazine.

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Largest Study Of Awareness During General Anaesthesia Identifies Risk Factors

September 15, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Accidental awareness is one of the most feared complications of general anaesthesia for both patients and anaesthetists. Patients report this failure of general anaesthesia in approximately 1 in every 19,000 cases, according to a report published in Anaesthesia.

'Electronic Skin' Could Improve Early Breast Cancer Detection

September 12, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives.

CS 3500 Intraoral Scanner Makes Debut in Oral Surgery Market

September 12, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

For the first time, Carestream Dental’s intraoral scanner, the CS 3500, will be available for oral surgeons to experience firsthand at the American Association of Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) Annual Meeting exhibition in Honolulu. Until recently, intraoral scanners were not widely used by oral surgeons. However, doctors who take advantage of an intraoral scanner are finding several benefits in doing so.

3D-Printed Replica Brains Used To Guide Life-Changing Pediatric Surgery

September 11, 2014 11:52 am | by Justine Alford, IFLscience.com | News | Comments

It seems the applications for 3D printing are endless. Scientists have churned out everything from houses to rocket parts, blood vessels to artificial limbs. Now, to add to the ever-growing collection of awesome 3D-printed goodies, medics have used the famous additive manufacturing technology to produce replicas of infants’ brains in order to practice life-saving but risky surgical procedures.

Perfect Focus Through Thick Layers May Bring Better Vision To Surgery

September 11, 2014 10:56 am | News | Comments

In a first-of-its-kind demonstration, published today in The Optical Society's (OSA) new high-impact journal Optica, a team of researchers has developed a powerful technique to focus laser light through even the murkiest of surroundings without the need for a guide star. This innovation, a specialized version of an adaptive optics microscope, can resolve a point less than one thousandth of a millimeter across.

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Olympus Announces Most Advanced Hemostasis Clip

September 9, 2014 11:45 am | Product Releases | Comments

Olympus, a global technology leader in designing and delivering innovative solutions for medical and surgical procedures, among other core businesses, announced Monday the commercial availability of its 510(k) cleared QuickClip Pro™ hemostasis clip designed for bleed control and defect closure during GI endoscopy procedures.

Study: Stem Cells Can Work To Treat Lung Disease

September 9, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

A new study has revealed how stem cells work to improve lung function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Previous studies have shown that stem cells can reduce lung inflammation and restore some function in ARDS, but experts are not sure how this occurs. The study, presented at the European Respiratory Society's International Congress, brings us a step closer to understanding the mechanisms that occur within an injured lung.

Collaborative Study Finds New Approach For Treating Esophageal Cancer

September 9, 2014 10:07 am | News | Comments

Drawing on their clinical and scientific experience, researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new strategy for attacking esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), one of the most deadly forms of cancer.

Bone Cancer Surgery Team Sees Success In Application Of Surgical Aid

September 9, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

An ortho-oncology team at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center successfully adapted a shoulder surgical aid (the Spider Limb Positioner) to conduct a left hip disarticulation on a melanoma patient as described in a case report published online in Medical Devices.

Breast Cancer Has Pharma’s Largest and Most Innovative Drug Pipeline

September 5, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

The breast cancer therapeutics pipeline boasts a high degree of innovation in first-in-class molecules, with many new technologies holding the potential to transform the clinical and commercial treatment landscape over the coming decade, says business intelligence provider GBI Research.

3D Printing Aids in Complex Brain Surgery of Brazilian Baby

September 5, 2014 10:55 am | by Eddie Krassenstein, 3DPrint.com | News | Comments

Dr. Hélio Rubens Machado, a neurosurgeon at the Medical School of the University of São Paulo in Brazil, was recently faced with quite the challenge, in performing surgery on a young child who was born with Sturge-Weber syndrome. With the help of CTI though, he was able to take a 3D scan of the child’s head and brain, and then 3D print it out to use as a reference prior to, and during surgery.

Surgery Could Be Breakthrough For Epilepsy Sufferers

September 4, 2014 11:41 am | by Jocelyn Maminta | News | Comments

There’s a breakthrough in surgery for epilepsy patients, reported wtnh.com Wednesday. And, Yale New Haven Hospital is the only one in the Northeast, offering it. It is the end of a long journey and the beginning of a hopeful one for Chelsea Murallo, living with epilepsy since she was two-years-old. She is in early on this Tuesday, prepping for innovative brain surgery at Yale-New Haven Hospital.

3M Partners With Premier on Catheter Contracts

September 3, 2014 5:04 pm | News | Comments

3M Critical & Chronic Care Solutions announced last week that it has reached a group purchasing agreement with health care alliance company Premier, Inc. for multiple catheter securement and stability products.

Non-Physical Worries Before Cancer Surgery Raise Patients’ Complication Risk

September 2, 2014 10:33 am | News | Comments

How well patients recover from cancer surgery may be influenced by more than their medical conditions and the operations themselves. Family conflicts and other non-medical problems may raise their risk of surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study has found.

Subcortical Surgery Group Formed to Advance Brain Surgery

August 28, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

More than 70 neurosurgeons from hospitals and academic centers across the country attended the first annual meeting of the Subcortical Surgery Group, formed this year by seven neurosurgeons using a new approach to address glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs), brain metastasis (METS), and intracerebral hematomas (ICHs).

Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints

August 28, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects.

Fetal Medicine Leaders Report on 100 Prenatal Surgeries for Spina Bifida

August 27, 2014 10:51 am | News | Comments

Reporting on 100 recent cases of fetal surgery for spina bifida, specialists at a premier fetal surgery program achieved results similar to those published three years previously in a landmark clinical trial that established a new standard of care for prenatal repair of this birth defect. Spina bifida is the most common birth defect of the central nervous system, affecting about 1,500 babies born each year in the United States.

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