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Study: Readmission After Colorectal Cancer Surgery a Quality Measure

October 23, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

No significant variation was found in hospital readmission rates after colorectal cancer surgery when the data was adjusted to account for patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses and operation types, which may prompt questions about the use of readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality ...

New Treatment Resolves Hazardous Airway Complication for Child

October 22, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

A case study published recently in the journal Pediatrics describes an innovative, minimally...

Getting Healthier Before Surgery Gives Patients Jump Start on Recovery

October 22, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

Following a conditioning, nutritional, and relaxation program before surgery is more helpful...

UC Davis Awarded $1.5M to Innovate Robotic Surgery for Head and Neck Cancers

October 22, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded UC Davis principal investigators Laura Marcu and...

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Meet The Man Who's Using Physics To Make Surgery Safer

October 21, 2014 11:38 am | by Chase Peterson-Withorn, Forbes | News | Comments

For those of us who remember Capri Suns, we undoubtedly recall struggling to insert the straw without piercing the back of the pouch. Believe it or not, the same thing occurs in surgery, according to Nikolai Begg, and it’s been a problem for over a century ...

Paralyzed Man Walks Again After Pioneering Surgery

October 21, 2014 10:19 am | by Ben Quinn, The Guardian | News | Comments

A man who was completely paralyzed from the waist down can walk again after a British-funded surgical breakthrough which offers hope to millions of people who are disabled by spinal cord injuries. Polish surgeons used nerve-supporting cells from the nose of Darek Fidyka, a Bulgarian man who was injured four years ago, to provide pathways along which the broken tissue was able to grow ...

HHS Accelerates Development of Ebola Vaccine

October 17, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

The development of a vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will be accelerated with support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Under a one-year contract with Profectus BioSciences Inc., ASPR’s Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority will provide approximately $5.8 million in funding ...

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Pre-Eclampsia May Be Caused By Fetus, Not Placenta

October 16, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) ...

Engineers Design Robot for Brain Surgery Through Cheek

October 16, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of Vanderbilt engineers wondered: Is it possible to address epileptic seizures in a less invasive way?

More Women Opting for Reconstruction Surgery

October 15, 2014 12:02 pm | by Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter | News | Comments

A growing number of breast cancer patients in the United States are having breast reconstruction surgery immediately after breast removal (mastectomy), a new study shows. This steady increase over the past 15 years is especially notable among women who were once considered too high-risk for breast reconstruction surgery, including those aged 65 and older ...

New Treatment Designed to Save More Eyes From Cancer

October 15, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

Doctors at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have developed a new technique for treating the eye cancer retinoblastoma to improve the odds for preventing eye loss, blindness or death in children with advanced forms of the disease ...

TheraNova Introduces Canary Catheter

October 14, 2014 10:37 am | Product Releases | Comments

TheraNova, LLC, a medical device development company creating practical medical solutions, announces the development of a minimally invasive Canary™ Catheter sepsis detection and treatment technology ...

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Impact of Mental Stress on the Heart Varies for Men, Women

October 13, 2014 11:44 am | News | Comments

Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease. The study, published was today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology ...

Rapid Control Interventions Key In Preventing Ebola Spread

October 10, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Researchers analyzed up-to-date epidemiological data of Ebola cases in Nigeria as of Oct. 1, 2014, in order to estimate the case fatality rate, proportion of health care workers infected, transmission progression and impact of control interventions on the size of the epidemic ...

Study: College Athletes in Contact Sports More Likely to Carry MRSA

October 9, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014™. This puts them at higher risk for infection and increases the likelihood of spreading the bug, which can cause serious and even fatal infections ... 

Virtual Backtable 3.0 Could Be Breakthrough In OR Efficiency

September 29, 2014 12:12 pm | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | Product Releases | Comments

Operating rooms continue to look for new ways to improve efficiency and trim costs. Innovations in software have allowed ORs to accomplish this goal and the Virtual Backtable 3.0, (VBT) from S2 Interactive, Inc., could be the next information technology innovation that meets both objectives. VBT provides instant analytics with dashboard metrics and analysis of surgical instrument usage specific to doctors and procedures.

Clues To How People Bounce Back From Surgery

September 25, 2014 10:31 am | by Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Medical Writer | News | Comments

One of the big frustrations of surgery: There's little way to know if you'll be a fast or slow healer, someone who feels back to normal in a week or is out of work for a month with lingering pain and fatigue. Stanford University researchers have discovered that right after surgery, patients' blood harbors clues about how fast they'll bounce back — and it has to do with the activity of certain immune cells that play a key role in healing.

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New Research Suggests Sleep Apnea Screening Before Surgery

September 24, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock ...

Quintero Talks About Hybrid OR Integration

September 23, 2014 11:28 am | by Surgical Products Staff | News | Comments

In the September-October print issue of Surgical Products, our cover story focused on technology and patient care solutions driving hybrid OR integration. This week, SP will run standalone Q&As from interviews related to our cover story. Today we feature Raoul Quintero, Regional President and CEO, North America, Maquet Medical Systems USA .

One-Year Outcomes Good For Patients Treated With Superficial Femoral Artery Stent

September 22, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

The use of stents has improved management and outcomes of coronary artery disease, and clinical trials are attempting to prove the same will be true for superficial femoral artery disease. Randomized trials have shown favorable results for self-expanding nitinol stents compared with balloon angioplasty. A new report seeks to test this treatment in a real-world population of patients enrolled in an observational registry.

New Guidelines For Managing Peri- And Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation

September 22, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. The guidelines are published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

Study: Exercise Boosts Tumor-Fighting Ability of Chemotherapy

September 19, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Their work, performed in a mouse model of melanoma, found that combining exercise with chemotherapy shrunk tumors more than chemotherapy alone.

Experts Issue Plea For Better Research And Education For Advanced Breast Cancer

September 19, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

Breast cancer experts around the world have issued a plea to researchers, academics, drug companies, funders and advocates to carry out high quality research and clinical trials for advanced breast cancer, a disease which is almost always fatal and for which there are many unanswered questions.

Researcher: Use of Anti-Inflammatory Medicines After Common Eye Surgery Isn’t Necessary

September 18, 2014 10:28 am | News | Comments

New research led by Queen’s University professor Robert Campbell (Ophthalmology) has revealed using anti-inflammatory medications after glaucoma laser surgery is not helpful or necessary. Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness in the world and about 400,000 Canadians are afflicted with the disease, which is mainly caused by pressure within the eye being high enough to damage the optic nerve.

Select Group of Lung Cancer Patients Achieve Long-Term Survival After Aggressive Treatments

September 16, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

A large, international analysis of patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indicates that a patient's overall survival rate can be related to factors including the timing of when metastases develop and lymph node involvement, and that aggressive treatment for "low-risk" patients leads to a five-year OS rate of 47.8 percent, according to research presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's Annual Meeting.

July/August 2014

September 15, 2014 4:23 pm | by Surgical Products Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

This is the digital version of the July/August 2014 issue of Surgical Products magazine.

Largest Study Of Awareness During General Anaesthesia Identifies Risk Factors

September 15, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Accidental awareness is one of the most feared complications of general anaesthesia for both patients and anaesthetists. Patients report this failure of general anaesthesia in approximately 1 in every 19,000 cases, according to a report published in Anaesthesia.

'Electronic Skin' Could Improve Early Breast Cancer Detection

September 12, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives.

CS 3500 Intraoral Scanner Makes Debut in Oral Surgery Market

September 12, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

For the first time, Carestream Dental’s intraoral scanner, the CS 3500, will be available for oral surgeons to experience firsthand at the American Association of Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) Annual Meeting exhibition in Honolulu. Until recently, intraoral scanners were not widely used by oral surgeons. However, doctors who take advantage of an intraoral scanner are finding several benefits in doing so.

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