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Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival For Most

September 3, 2014 10:47 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Removing both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests. The results raise concerns about riskier, potentially unnecessary operations that increasing numbers of women are choosing.

SSIs May Occur Less After Minimally Invasive Surgery

September 2, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Minimally invasive surgery is associated with fewer surgical-site infections than is open surgery, according to a new observational study of tens of thousands of patients, reported Rueters Health on Tuesday. "Physicians should consider the adoption of minimally invasive approaches in order to reduce the risk of surgical site infections," said lead author Dr. Giorgio Gandaglia.

Programs Aim to Standardize Surgical Care for Children

September 2, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

For parents, the prospect of a child's surgery can be frightening, with little information on how to pick the best hospital or understand complex procedures. To help, surgeons have developed a new classification system for pediatric surgical centers according to the level of care they provide, similar to the one that classifies trauma centers, reported the Wall Street Journal on Monday.

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Cardiac Surgery: Medication Shows Mixed Results in Reducing Complications

September 2, 2014 10:05 am | News | Comments

Administration of colchicine, a plant-based medication commonly used to treat gout, before and after cardiac surgery showed mixed results in reducing potential complications from this type of surgery, but it did increase the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Florida Prostate Cancer Specialist Challenges Robotic Surgical System

August 28, 2014 3:47 pm | Blogs | Comments

In an extensive article http://www.urologyweb.com/robotic-prostate-cancer-surgery-a-public-health-nightmare/, Urologist Dr. Bert Vorstman details “Robotic Prostate Cancer Surgery: A Public Health Nightmare”, the story behind prostate cancer and the industry that has been built around it.

Ebola Virus: CDC Releases Recommendations to Hospitals

August 28, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Standard, contact, and droplet precautions are recommended for management of hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF), also referred to as Ebola Viral Disease (EVD). Though these recommendations focus on the hospital setting, the recommendations for personal protective equipment (PPE) and environmental infection control measures are applicable to any healthcare setting.

Hospital Loses $2M in Wrongful Death Lawsuit

August 28, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

According to court documents, Olga Sanchez had been admitted to the hospital after complaints of flank pain and urinating blood. During her admission, she was examined by a hematologist and her lab tests were interpreted by a clinical pathologist. Despite a laboratory diagnosis of a bleeding disorder, the doctors and the hospital never provided appropriate care to stop the internal bleeding.

Chinese Teenager to Have Surgery for Unusual Neck Condition

August 28, 2014 12:43 pm | News | Comments

The New York Daily News reported on Thursday that a Chinese teenager with an unusual neck condition will receive corrective surgery. Fu Wengui, 15, has 10 vertebrae in his neck — three more than the average person. The condition causes him pain, stress on his nerves and makes it difficult for him to walk with the super long neck, according to REX Features.

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Older Parkinson's Patients No Higher Risk for DBS

August 26, 2014 11:47 am | News | Comments

Implantating deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson's disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report. The findings, published Aug. 25 in the journal JAMA Neurology, ease concerns that patients older than 75 are poorer candidates for DBS because they may be prone to bleeding, infections or other complications that can arise after surgeries.

Nasal Cell Transplant Leads to Snotty Spine

August 25, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Surgeons removed cysts layered with actual snot from a 29-year-old woman's back 8 years after transplanting nasal stem cells into her spinal injury, neurosurgeon Brian Dlouhy, MD, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues reported.

Botched Operations at Private UK Surgery Clinics Hurting Patients

August 21, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

For over a decade, it has been government policy in England to take money from the public, national health system (NHS) and give it to private (often for-profit) clinics to perform procedures and surgeries otherwise done at public hospitals. Doctors in England have routinely spoken out against the policy. They’ve warned about poorer quality care and safety risks for patients.

Plastic Surgery: Important Questions Before Going Under the Knife

August 21, 2014 11:23 am | by Dr. Michael Gartner | News | Comments

Within the field of plastic surgery, there are a lot of negative connotations that people associate with it. However, that’s a result of the non-licensed doctors and those seeking plastic surgery that go overboard and their psychological issues are not properly addressed. When someone chooses to get plastic surgery, it’s a big decision to make because you’re changing what you see in the mirror everyday, which can be overwhelming.

Is Reverse Plastic Surgery New Trend in South Korea?

August 20, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Euny Hong joins guest host Terry O'Reilly to discuss the ubiquity of plastic surgery in South Korea, where it is believed one in three women have gone under the knife in recent years. Hong, author of The Birth of Korean Cool, explains the cultural factors driving their popularity, and sheds light on the growing counter-trend that inspired the new Back to my Face reality show.

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Is China's 50 percent C-section delivery rate too high?

August 20, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

Efforts must be made to decrease China's increasing caesarean section rate, suggests a new commentary published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). China has one of the highest C-section rates in the world. Of 16 million babies born in 2010, about half were by caesarean. The current Chinese language literature on caesarean rates reports total caesarean rates ranging from 36% to 58%.

Deaths Rise With Shift to Outpatient Procedures for Urology Surgeries

August 19, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

As hospitals have shifted an array of common urological surgeries from inpatient procedures to outpatient, potentially preventable deaths have increased following complications. The study also identified older, sicker, minority patients and those with public insurance as more likely to die after a potentially recognizable or preventable complication.

Postsurgical Cognitive Side Effects Still a Concern

August 19, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A nationwide survey of Swedish anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists has found there is low awareness of the risks of cognitive side effects following surgery. Furthermore, only around half of the respondents used depth-of-anesthesia monitors. According to the survey results, less attention is being paid to cognitive side effects following surgery, yet these complications can have major implications for the patient.

Report: Clinics Fail to Warn Patients of Laser Eye Dangers

August 18, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

The dangers of laser eye surgery are not being properly explained to people desperate to improve their vision. One in three consultations by clinics offering the treatment were of poor quality, according to a Which? investigation. The consumer watchdog found that the relatively low prices promised by the major chains in their marketing are not what they seem, while some outlets sting customers with unexpected fees.

High-Intensity Exercise Safe and Effective in Heart Transplant Recipients

August 18, 2014 11:09 am | News | Comments

High-intensity exercise can help stable heart transplant patients reach higher levels of exercise capacity, and gain better control of their blood pressure than moderate intensity exercise, investigators report in a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. 

Ohio Doctor, Medical Group Owe $1.8 Million in Surgery Death

August 14, 2014 10:30 am | News | Comments

A Franklin County, Ohio jury has awarded $1.8 million to the family of a 30-year-old man who died after surgery in 2010. According to the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, the jurors found that Dr. Adam M. Zochowski of Columbus and his medical group, Central Ohio Surgical Associates Inc., were negligent in assessing the man, Carl Whitmer, and clearing him for surgery.

Medical Device Staffers Admit to Defrauding Hospitals

August 13, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

Federal prosecutors say two staffers at a northern New Jersey medical devices firm have admitted their roles in a scheme to defraud hospitals out of more than $800,000. Daniel Metz, a 34-year-old Fairfield resident, and 35-year-old Charles Carey Jr., of Clark, both pleaded guilty Tuesday to conspiracy to commit wire fraud.

Study Shows Tool Effective in Evaluating Doctor's Bedside Manner

August 11, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

According to the study, nearly 90 percent of residents who were surveyed on the effectiveness of the tool thought that the scenarios reflected the reality of what they would encounter in general practice, and more than 80 percent agreed that it would help them prepare for their final exam.

Judge Tosses Suit Claiming Botched Circumcision

August 8, 2014 11:06 am | News | Comments

A judge threw out a lawsuit filed by an Alabama man who claims a botched circumcision resulted in the amputation of his penis, ruling Thursday that the complaint wasn't specific under state malpractice law. Johnny Lee Banks Jr., 59, has numerous health problems including diabetes that have led to the amputation of his legs. Attorneys for the doctors and hospital contend the medical procedure alleged in the suit never happened.

2014 ESP Award Submission: Robotic FloShield for Laparoscopic Surgery

August 7, 2014 12:22 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Robotic FloShield™, is a new standard in maintaining unparalleled visual clarity during laparoscopic surgery. FloShield proactively protects the laparoscope from condensation, debris and smoke. According to FloShield, the device's unique design virtually eliminates the need to remove the laparoscope for cleaning, minimizing surgical interruptions and saving OR time.

2014 ESP Award Submission: Breck Surgical Products "Splat Mat"

August 6, 2014 11:24 am | Product Releases | Comments

The “Splat Mat” from Breck Surgical Products is a 3’x 4’, super absorbent, low profile, skid resistant, fluid proof backed, and disposable surgical floor mat. According to Breck Surgical Products, the company issued the first disposable mat on the market in 1989.

Database Helps Curb Risk of Post-Op Blood Clots

July 29, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

Patients who are placed in contact isolation after their operations are at a particularly high risk for developing life-threatening blood clots, but ensuring they move around has helped curb the occurrence of venous thromboembolism in one hospital.

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