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Common Painkillers Combined With Other Drugs May Cause High Risk of Bleeding

October 2, 2014 5:35 pm | News | Comments

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — such as ibuprofen and aspirin — increase one's risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. When taken in combination with other drugs, this risk is significantly higher, according to new research appearing in the October issue of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

Treatment To Reduce Blood Clots In Surgery Examined

October 2, 2014 5:15 pm | News | Comments

The effectiveness of a treatment to reduce blood clots among otolaryngology patients admitted for surgery appears to differ based on patient risk and the procedure. The report was written by Vinita Bahl, D.M.D., M.P.P., of the University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, and colleagues ... 

Girl's Family Seeks Reversal of Brain-Death Ruling

October 2, 2014 4:23 pm | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The family of a California teenager declared brain-dead after suffering complications from sleep apnea surgery is seeking an unprecedented court order declaring her alive, reported the Associated Press. The family's attorney, Chris Dolan, argued in court papers filed this week that 13-year-old Jahi McMath is no longer brain-dead and shows significant signs of life ...

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Hospitals With Aggressive Treatment Styles Had Lower Failure to Rescue Rates

October 2, 2014 10:57 am | News | Comments

Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity (HCI), had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication (failure to rescue) but longer hospitalizations, writes Kyle H. Sheetz, M.D., M.S., of the Center for Healthcare Outcomes and Policy, Ann Arbor, Mich., and colleagues.

US Sunshine Act Will Enlighten Patients, But Many Physicians Remain in the Dark

October 2, 2014 10:03 am | News | Comments

On Sept. 30, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released the Open Payments database to the US public. This forms part of the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, which requires drug and device manufacturers to provide transparency into payments made to physicians, surgeons and other health professionals in exchange for their services ...

Doctors Remove 55-Pound Tumor From Woman’s Back After 10-Hour Surgery

October 1, 2014 11:37 am | by Richard James, BuzzFeed | News | Comments

Surgeons in southern China have successfully removed a huge tumour from a 35-year-old woman’s back. According to the Rex news agency, the woman, Yan, had tumours all over her body, but the largest stretched from her right shoulder to her ankle ...

Reintroducing Aprotinin In Cardiac Surgery May Put Patients at Risk

September 30, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

Cardiac surgery patients may be at risk because of a decision by Health Canada and the European Medicines Agency to reintroduce the use of aprotinin after its withdrawal from the worldwide market in 2007, assert the authors of a previous major trial that found a substantially increased risk of death associated with the drug ...

Report: Risk of Opioids Outweigh Benefits For Pain

September 30, 2014 10:16 am | News | Comments

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the risk of death, overdose, addiction or serious side effects with prescription opioids outweigh the benefits in chronic, non-cancer conditions such as headache, fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. The position paper is published in the September 30, 2014, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology ... 

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Decision Analysis Can Help Women Make Choices About Breast Reconstruction

September 29, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Decision analysis techniques can help surgeons and patients evaluate alternatives for breast reconstruction—leading to a "good decision" that reflects the woman's preferences and values, according to an article in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Mississippi Named 'Best State to Practice' for Second Straight Year

September 26, 2014 10:27 am | News | Comments

For the second straight year, the Magnolia State is tops when it comes to a physician-friendly locale to practice medicine. Each year, Physicians Practice compiles its list of the "Best States to Practice," based on several analytics including cost of living, disciplinary actions taken against physicians, tax burden per capita, and physician density ...

Brothers Behind Lap-Band Surgery Sued

September 26, 2014 10:05 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

According to the Associated Press, UnitedHealth Group Inc. has sued two brothers who ran a company that promoted Lap-Band weight-loss surgery, accusing the pair of defrauding the insurer of more than $40 million through a complex billing scheme.

Treatment Studied To Help Patients ‘Burned To The Bone’

September 25, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

According to a University of Michigan report released Thursday, an anti-inflammatory treatment, studied in the labs of regenerative medicine specialists and trauma surgeons, may prevent what’s become one of the war-defining injuries for today’s troops.

Study: Pain Keeps Surgery Patients Awake, Extends Stay

September 25, 2014 10:05 am | News | Comments

Pain can make it difficult for some patients to get a good night's rest while recovering in the hospital following certain surgical procedures, often resulting in longer hospital stays, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

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New Research Suggests Sleep Apnea Screening Before Surgery

September 24, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock ...

How Safe Are Outpatient Surgical Facilities?

September 23, 2014 10:14 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. (AAAASF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1980 to promote patient safety in the outpatient setting. Patient safety is the sole mission of the organization. "AAAASF is sympathetic to the recent unfortunate and highly publicized case involving an outpatient surgical facility," said Dr. Geoffrey Keyes, AAAASF board president.

Citing Joan Rivers, Texas' Perry Backs Clinic Law

September 22, 2014 10:54 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Sunday invoked comedian Joan Rivers' death at a surgical clinic while defending a law he signed that would close the majority of abortion facilities in the nation's second-most populous state. The potential 2016 presidential candidate said the law made Texas safer, even though a federal judge in August blocked a key provision that requires abortion clinics to meet hospital-level operating standards.

Neurosurgery Tackles Past, Current And Future Concepts of Sports Concussion

September 22, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

An estimated 1.68 to 3.8 million sports-related concussions occur in the United States each year, and there are likely a significant number that go unreported. Current Concepts in Sports Concussion is a comprehensive, 16-article supplement of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Family Squabbles Can Derail Recovery From Cancer Surgery

September 19, 2014 11:05 am | by Alan Mozes, HealthDay Reporter | News | Comments

Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, a new study suggests. Investigators found that patients with a so-called quality-of-life "deficit" appeared to have a nearly three times greater risk for complications compared to those with a normal or good quality of life.

Pennsylvania Deaths Related To Robotic Surgery

September 19, 2014 10:45 am | by Kris B. Mamula, Pittsburgh Business Times | News | Comments

Doctors reported 722 “safety events” between 2005 and March 31 involving use of robotic surgery in a variety of procedures, the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority found. Unintended laceration, bleeding and infection were among 75 percent of the problems that were reported, according to the Harrisburg-based nonprofit that seeks to identify and correct problems in medical care.

Utah Doctor Gets Up To Life In Wife's Murder

September 19, 2014 10:10 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

A Utah doctor found guilty of killing his wife in a trial that became a national true-crime cable TV obsession will serve 17 years to life in prison, a state judge decided Friday. The long-awaited sentence comes seven years after prosecutors say Martin MacNeill knocked out his wife with drugs prescribed following cosmetic surgery and left her to die in a bathtub so he could begin a new life with his mistress.

Report: US Health System Not Properly Designed To Meet Needs Of Patients Nearing Death

September 18, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

The U.S. health care system is not properly designed to meet the needs of patients nearing the end of life and those of their families, and major changes to the system are necessary, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The 21-member committee that wrote the report envisioned an approach to end-of-life care that integrates traditional medical care and social services and that is high-quality, affordable, and sustainable.

Joan Rivers' Doctor Snapped Selfie During Throat Surgery

September 17, 2014 11:28 am | by Ginger Adams Otis, New York Daily News | News | Comments

Joan Rivers’ personal doctor stopped to take a selfie in the procedure room while the famous comedienne was under anesthesia, just moments before she went into cardiac arrest, CNN reported Tuesday. Rivers, 81, was getting a routine scoping of her throat at Yorkville Endoscopy Aug. 28 when her own physician performed an unplanned biopsy on her vocal cords, a source told the Daily News.

Research Reveals Reasons Behind Ethnic Rhinoplasty Plastic Surgery Complications

September 17, 2014 10:55 am | News | Comments

Rhinoplasty surgery, also known as "nose reshaping" or "nose job" was the second most requested cosmetic surgical procedure for 2013, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.  Yet, nose reshaping is considered one of the most complex of facial plastic surgery procedures for a surgeon to perform. 

New Radiosurgery Technology Provides Highly Accurate Treatment, Patient Comfort

September 17, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A new stereotactic radiosurgery system provides the same or a higher level of accuracy in targeting cancer tumors – but offers greater comfort to patients and the ability to treat multiple tumors at once – when compared to other radiation therapy stereotactic systems. The study shows the Edge™ Radiosurgery Suite is able to target cancer tumors within 1 mm, providing sub-millimeter accuracy with extreme precision.

Ebola Outbreak 'Out Of All Proportion' And Severity Cannot Be Predicated

September 16, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr. Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale.

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