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ACS NSQIP Participating Hospitals Recognized for Achieving Meritorious Outcomes for Patient Care

October 23, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) has recognized 44 of their 445 participating hospitals for achieving meritorious outcomes for surgical patient care in 2013.  ACS NSQIP participating hospitals are required to track the outcomes of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures and then analyze their results ...

'Watch' Cites Concern About Flexible Reamer Breakage in ACL Reconstruction

October 23, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

JBJS Case Connector, an online case journal published by the Journal of Bone and...

Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache?

October 23, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according...

Large Variation in Cesarean Rates Across US Hospitals

October 22, 2014 10:40 am | News | Comments

Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States. US cesarean rates...

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Zimmer's Samudio: 'Crucial For All Healthcare Workers to Work Together' in Ebola fight

October 20, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

In our continuing coverage of how the Ebola virus is affecting medical facilities, Candace L. Samudio, longtime healthcare professional and clinical excellence team leader in the surgical division at Zimmer, provides insight on the importance of surgical helmet systems and stresses the need for ORs and ERs to work together ... 

NBC's Snyderman Faces Credibility Issues

October 20, 2014 10:34 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The quarantine against possible Ebola exposure ends this week for Dr. Nancy Snyderman, but the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor. An admitted lapse in the quarantine, combined with a curiously imprecise explanation, unleashed a furious response. NBC must now decide whether Snyderman's credibility is too damaged for her to continue reporting on Ebola or other medical issues and, if so, for how long ...

Simple Test May Predict Surgical Wound Healing Complications

October 17, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications, due to radiation they receive before surgery. Now a study has suggested that a simple test called transcutaneous oximetry may be able to predict which of these patients are most likely to experience wound-healing complications, potentially enabling surgeons to take extra precautions ...

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Joan Rivers Died From Low Blood Oxygen During Surgery

October 17, 2014 11:40 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Joan Rivers died of brain damage from low blood oxygen during a medical procedure to check out voice changes and reflux, the medical examiner's office ruled Thursday. The comedian, who was 81, died Sept. 4 after she'd been hospitalized for about a week when she went into cardiac arrest during the procedure at a doctor's office ...

HHS Accelerates Development of Ebola Vaccine

October 17, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

The development of a vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will be accelerated with support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. Under a one-year contract with Profectus BioSciences Inc., ASPR’s Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority will provide approximately $5.8 million in funding ...

Are U.S. Hospitals Really Ready for Ebola?

October 17, 2014 10:21 am | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | News | Comments

With the recent news of a Dallas nurse being infected with the Ebola virus, hospitals across the U.S. are scrambling to prepare for a potential outbreak of the deadly disease. In this interview with Surgical Products, Martie Moore, RN, MAOM, CPHQ and chief nursing officer of Medline Industries, Inc., provides insight into how hospitals and medical supply manufacturers are preparing for a possible Ebola outbreak ...

Pre-Eclampsia May Be Caused By Fetus, Not Placenta

October 16, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) ...

Post-Tonsillectomy Complications More Likely in Kids From Lower-Income Families

October 16, 2014 11:20 am | News | Comments

Removing a child's tonsils is one of the most common surgeries performed in the United States, with approximately 500,000 children undergoing the procedure each year. New research finds that children from lower-income families are more likely to have complications following the surgery ...

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Patients Seek Help For Eating Disorders Years After Weight Loss Surgery

October 16, 2014 10:33 am | by The New Haven Register | News | Comments

Morbidly obese individuals who had weight loss surgery are seeking treatment for eating disorders years after their procedure, prompting concerns among some experts about the assessment process used to identify surgical candidates. “They are terrified of gaining the weight back,” said Dr. Sara Niego, medical director of the Eating Disorders Program at Hartford Hospital’s Institute of Living ...

Sedasys Launches Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System

October 15, 2014 11:40 am | Product Releases | Comments

Sedasys, a Division of Ethicon US, LLC, announced the U.S. launch of its SEDASYS® System, a Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation (CAPS) system that enables trained physician-led teams to administer minimal-to-moderate propofol sedation to healthy patients undergoing routine colonoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) procedures ... 

Study: Decline in Anesthesia-Related Deaths

October 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

Although recent trends show a decline in anesthesia-related deaths, a study published today by the Journal of Healthcare Risk Management concludes that risks are evolving and both physicians and patients can take steps to reduce injuries ...

Obamacare Website Won’t Reveal Insurance Costs for 2015 Until After Election

October 14, 2014 12:03 pm | by The Washington Times | News | Comments

Those planning to purchase health insurance on the Obamacare exchange will soon find out how much rates have increased — after the Nov. 4 election. Enrollment on the Healthcare.gov website begins Nov. 15, or 11 days after the midterm vote, and critics who worry about rising premium hikes in 2015 say that’s no coincidence. Last year’s inaugural enrollment period on the health-care exchange began Oct. 1 ...

Teenage Baseball Pitchers at Risk for Permanent Shoulder Injury

October 14, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Young baseball pitchers who throw more than 100 pitches per week are at risk for a newly identified overuse injury that can impede normal shoulder development and lead to additional problems, including rotator cuff tears, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology ...

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U.S. Prepared for Ebola—10 Patients at a Time

October 13, 2014 12:04 pm | by Dr. Jane M. Orient | Blogs | Comments

Have you wondered why Ebola patients are being sent to Omaha, Nebraska? It’s because one physician, Dr. Philip Smith, had the foresight to set up the Nebraska Biocontainment Patient Care Unit after the 9/11 attacks as a bulwark against bioterrorism ...

Impact of Mental Stress on the Heart Varies for Men, Women

October 13, 2014 11:44 am | News | Comments

Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease. The study, published was today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology ...

Report: Chewing Gum Before Surgery Safe

October 13, 2014 10:32 am | by Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter | News | Comments

It's safe to chew gum while fasting before surgery, researchers report. Patients are usually told not to eat or drink before surgery to prevent complications while they're under anesthesia, but it wasn't clear if the same was true for chewing gum ...

Rapid Control Interventions Key In Preventing Ebola Spread

October 10, 2014 12:13 pm | News | Comments

New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Researchers analyzed up-to-date epidemiological data of Ebola cases in Nigeria as of Oct. 1, 2014, in order to estimate the case fatality rate, proportion of health care workers infected, transmission progression and impact of control interventions on the size of the epidemic ...

Maryland School of Medicine Begins Ebola Vaccine Trials

October 10, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced that the CVD, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine ... 

Twenty Years of Evidence Backs Bariatric Surgery

October 10, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

More than 20 years of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery produces greater weight loss and more type 2 diabetes remissions than nonsurgical treatments for the obese. The results, from a National Institutes of Health symposium held last year, support the idea that weight loss surgeries are effective and safe, at least within the first two to five years after surgery. But more studies of long term effects are needed, the authors say ...

Investigation Into GI Scope-Related Infections Changes National Guidelines

October 9, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

National guidelines for the cleaning of certain gastrointestinal (GI) scopes are likely to be updated due to findings from UPMC's infection prevention team. The research and updated disinfection technique will be shared Saturday in Philadelphia at ID Week 2014, an annual meeting of health professionals in infectious disease fields ... 

Study: College Athletes in Contact Sports More Likely to Carry MRSA

October 9, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014™. This puts them at higher risk for infection and increases the likelihood of spreading the bug, which can cause serious and even fatal infections ... 

Expert Rejects Evidence of Life in Brain-Dead Girl

October 9, 2014 10:52 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

A court-appointed expert has told a California judge he sees no evidence that a 13-year-old girl is alive 10 months after a coroner signed her death certificate. The opinion was provided Monday in the case of Jahi McMath by Stanford University pediatric neurologist Paul Fisher. Jahi was declared brain dead on Dec. 12 after she went into cardiac arrest following surgery to treat sleep apnea ...

The Risks of Performing Surgery During the Ebola Outbreak

October 9, 2014 10:35 am | by Karen Attiah, The Washington Post | News | Comments

Beyond the death toll from Ebola across West Africa the outbreak of the deadly virus has also caused serious complications to the provisions of other types of health care. People seeking access to health care for treatment of malaria cannot get help, pregnant women cannot get assistance delivering babies, and people cannot get access to routine immunizations ...

Formerly Conjoined Twin From Panama On Road To Recovery

October 8, 2014 12:08 pm | by Lisa Sigell, CBSLA.com | News | Comments

A 2-year-old girl from Panama, who underwent surgery at a local hospital in Los Angeles, is on the road to recovery. Ana Paula was born a conjoined twin and underwent an operation 20 days later, which killed her twin and left her with a third leg and acute medical complications that could not be treated in her home country ...

Universal Screening For MRSA May Be Too Costly

October 8, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Numerous experts and policy makers have called for hospitals to screen patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and isolate anyone testing positive to prevent the spread of these so-called "Superbugs" in healthcare settings. Several states have enacted laws requiring patients be screened for MRSA upon admission ... 

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