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The Lead

Heart Valve Surgery Grows For People In Their Nineties

October 31, 2014 11:04 am | by Larry Husten, Forbes.com | News | Comments

As people continue to live longer physicians are increasingly confronted with very elderly patients who have serious conditions that might benefit from surgery but who are at high risk for surgical complications. Published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, doctors at Mayo Clinic reviewed their experience with 59 patients age 90 or older who had severe aortic stenosis and underwent surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Study: Elderly Face No Added Risk From Cosmetic Surgery

October 31, 2014 10:39 am | by Josh Brown, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Senior citizens are at no higher risk for complications from cosmetic surgery than younger...

Incisionless Procedure Improves Long-Term GERD Symptoms

October 30, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

EndoGastric Solutions (EGS) announced publication of US registry data showing that long-term...

Mild Depressive Symptoms Weaken Spinal Stenosis Surgery Outcome

October 30, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery,...

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ACS Report: Multi-Procedural Technology Drives Innovation and Profitability

October 29, 2014 9:00 am | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Blogs | Comments

Walking the halls of the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress & Expo offers a number of opportunities. Embedded within the clamor of the show floor and pictured in part by the varying HD, 4K and 3D displays, are an array of new products promising to push the OR forward ....

Most Internet Sources on Prostate Cancer Disagree With Expert Panel

October 29, 2014 8:24 am | News | Comments

Only 17 percent of top-ranked consumer health websites advise against screening for prostate cancer, a recommendation made more than two years ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), according to a study presented at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Robotically Assisted Bypass Surgery Reduces Complications

October 29, 2014 8:20 am | News | Comments

Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery times, making the procedure safer and less risky, says a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

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Poor Access to General Surgeons Increases Children's Risk of Ruptured Appendix

October 29, 2014 2:05 am | News | Comments

Delayed treatment for appendicitis can often lead to a ruptured appendix. That's exactly what is more likely to happen to many children in North Carolina if they have to delay getting treatment because of poor access to general surgeons, according to new study findings presented this week at the American College of Surgeons 2014 Clinical Congress ...

New Frailty Test Predicts Risk of Poor Outcomes in Elderly Patients

October 29, 2014 1:54 am | News | Comments

A simplified frailty index created by surgeons at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Mich., is a reliable tool for assessing risk of mortality and serious complications in older patients considering total hip and knee replacement procedures, according to new study findings presented today at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons ...

Many Older Patients Would Benefit From Palliative Care

October 27, 2014 9:14 pm | News | Comments

Half of older adults who sustain injuries severe enough that they could die in the hospital or become unable to function independently are not asked in the intensive care unit (ICU) if they wish to speak with palliative care specialists about their preferences for end-of-life care, a new study finds ...

New Drug Shows Promise in Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

October 27, 2014 8:31 pm | News | Comments

A foot ulcer is typically a painful inconvenience to most people, but to a person with diabetes it could mean an infection, or worse, an amputation. But a research team at Stanford University has developed a drug delivered through a skin patch that not only helps foot wounds heal better, but also prevents those wounds from recurring, according to study results they presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress ...

Is Surgery Safer at a Teaching Hospital?

October 27, 2014 8:11 pm | by Hannah Webster, US News and World Report | News | Comments

Like anything, it takes time and practice to become a qualified surgeon. But what is the appropriate balance of allowing residents to gain experience and giving patients the best care possible? U.S. News explored the risks and benefits to surgery at teaching hospitals: Do the benefits of surgery at a major academic institution outweigh the costs of patients being used as a teaching tool?

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Ebola and Human Error: A Proactive Approach For Medical Professionals

October 27, 2014 7:53 pm | News | Comments

As the Ebola situation continues to evolve in North America, the Practicing Perfection Institute, Inc. (PPI) and the international not-for-profit Human Performance Association, Inc. (HPA) have combined forces to offer proactive solutions for the prevention of infection and contamination to medical professionals and to the general public ...

The Ebola Epidemic: Is There a Way Out?

October 27, 2014 11:02 am | News | Comments

Not everyone who contracts the Ebola virus dies, the survival rate is around 30% suggesting that some kind of immunity to the disease is possible. Experimental treatments and vaccines against Ebola exist but have not yet been tested in large groups for safety and efficacy (phase 2 trials).

Chest Radiation To Treat Childhood Cancer Increases Patients' Risk of Getting Breast Cancer

October 27, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

A new study has found that patients who received chest radiation for Wilms tumor, a rare childhood cancer, face an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life due to their radiation exposure. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that cancer screening guidelines might be re-evaluated to facilitate the early diagnosis and prompt treatment of breast cancer.

Genetics Could Play Role in Narrowing of Aortic Valve

October 27, 2014 12:59 am | News | Comments

In an analysis that included approximately 35,000 participants, genetic predisposition to elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was associated with aortic valve calcium and narrowing of the aortic valve, findings that support a causal association between LDL-C and aortic valve disease, according to a study appearing in JAMA ... 

Only Six Percent of U.S. Hospitals Ready For Ebola Patient

October 27, 2014 12:43 am | News | Comments

Only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at U.S. hospitals conducted October 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

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Newly Donated Blood Reduces Complications From Heart Surgery

October 27, 2014 12:23 am | News | Comments

Heart surgery patients who received newly donated blood have significantly fewer post-operative complications than those who received blood that had been donated more than two weeks before their surgery, a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress has shown.

Volunteer Guidelines For Clinicians in the Ebola Epidemic

October 24, 2014 12:49 pm | News | Comments

Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness Journal has released a novel, informative article that speaks to volunteers within the Ebola epidemic. The article, contributed by a consortium of Boston-based hospitals, is entitled Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak ...

Quadruplet Mom-to-Be Has Emergency Surgery to Save Babies

October 24, 2014 11:28 am | by Gillian Mohney, ABC News | News | Comments

An expectant mom getting ready to welcome two sets of identical twins -- a one in 70 million occurrence -- endured emergency surgery this week after doctors found signs of a rare condition that could affect the health of one set of twins ... 

British Woman Dies After Thai Cosmetic Surgery

October 24, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A British woman has died under anesthesia during a cosmetic procedure by an uncertified surgeon at a clinic in Thailand's capital, authorities said Friday. The 24-year-old patient stopped breathing after receiving an anesthetic during the operation Thursday night, said Boonruang Triruangworawat, director-general of the Health Service Support Department ...

For Brain Hemorrhage, Risk of Death is Lower at High-Volume Hospitals

October 24, 2014 10:31 am | News | Comments

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health ...

ACS NSQIP Participating Hospitals Recognized for Achieving Meritorious Outcomes for Patient Care

October 23, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) has recognized 44 of their 445 participating hospitals for achieving meritorious outcomes for surgical patient care in 2013.  ACS NSQIP participating hospitals are required to track the outcomes of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures and then analyze their results ...

'Watch' Cites Concern About Flexible Reamer Breakage in ACL Reconstruction

October 23, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

JBJS Case Connector, an online case journal published by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, has issued a "Watch" regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Flexible reamers help surgeons achieve optimal femoral-tunnel parameters, but they are prone to breakage in certain situations, as the "Watch" article explains ...

Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache?

October 23, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In the study, gastric bypass surgery and gastric banding surgery were associated with later developing a condition called spontaneous intracranial hypotension in a small percentage of people ...

Large Variation in Cesarean Rates Across US Hospitals

October 22, 2014 10:40 am | News | Comments

Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States. US cesarean rates increased from 20.7% in 1996 to 32.9% in 2009 but have since stabilized, with 1.3 million American women having had a cesarean delivery in 2011. Rates of cesarean delivery vary across hospitals, and understanding reasons for the variation could help shed light on practices related to cesarean delivery ...

Zimmer's Samudio: 'Crucial For All Healthcare Workers to Work Together' in Ebola fight

October 20, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

In our continuing coverage of how the Ebola virus is affecting medical facilities, Candace L. Samudio, longtime healthcare professional and clinical excellence team leader in the surgical division at Zimmer, provides insight on the importance of surgical helmet systems and stresses the need for ORs and ERs to work together ... 

NBC's Snyderman Faces Credibility Issues

October 20, 2014 10:34 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The quarantine against possible Ebola exposure ends this week for Dr. Nancy Snyderman, but the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor. An admitted lapse in the quarantine, combined with a curiously imprecise explanation, unleashed a furious response. NBC must now decide whether Snyderman's credibility is too damaged for her to continue reporting on Ebola or other medical issues and, if so, for how long ...

Simple Test May Predict Surgical Wound Healing Complications

October 17, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

As many as 35 percent of patients who undergo surgery to remove soft tissue sarcomas experience wound-healing complications, due to radiation they receive before surgery. Now a study has suggested that a simple test called transcutaneous oximetry may be able to predict which of these patients are most likely to experience wound-healing complications, potentially enabling surgeons to take extra precautions ...

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