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German Court Orders Vaccination Cynic To Pay For Virus Proof

March 13, 2015 11:59 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A German court has ruled that a prominent anti-vaccination advocate must pay a doctor 100,000 euros ($105,720) in prize money he had promised to anyone who could prove measles is a virus.

Less Liver Removed, Fewer Complications

March 12, 2015 2:11 pm | by American College of Surgeons | News | Comments

A new Journal of the American College of Surgeons study shows that a surgical approach focused on preserving liver tissue in patients undergoing a liver operation leads to lower mortality rates and fewer complications.

How Much Cancer Imaging is Too Much?

March 12, 2015 1:55 pm | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

A study concluded that regional culture and infrastructure could contribute to an inappropriate level of prostate and breast cancer imaging.

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ACA May Reduce ER Visits; Doesn't Affect Hospitalizations

March 12, 2015 1:48 pm | by American College of Emergency Physicians | News | Comments

Two patient groups created by the Affordable Care Act had slightly fewer emergency department visits than they had before health care reform. However, there was no change in the rate of the most expensive types of emergency visits: those that lead to hospitalization.

Hundreds of Hospitals Struggle to Improve Patient Satisfaction

March 11, 2015 12:57 pm | by Jordan Rau, Kaiser Health News | Articles | Comments

Nationally, the hospital industry has improved in all the areas the surveys required by Medicare track, including how clean and quiet their rooms are and how well doctors and nurses communicate. But hundreds of hospitals have not made headway in boosting their ratings, federal records show.

One-Year TAVR Outcomes Available

March 11, 2015 12:46 pm | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

David R. Holmes Jr., M.D., of Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and colleagues examined 1-year outcomes for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients who had 30-day outcomes previously reported. 

Ensuring Respect and Dignity in the ICU

March 11, 2015 12:40 pm | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | News | Comments

Identifying loss of dignity and lack of respectful treatment as preventable harms in health care, researchers at Johns Hopkins have taken on the ambitious task of defining and ensuring respectful care in the high-stakes environment of the intensive care unit.

Injured Kidneys Can Be Used for Transplants

March 11, 2015 12:36 pm | by Yale University | News | Comments

Kidneys from deceased donors that have acute injuries are frequently discarded instead of being used for transplant. However, a Yale-led study finds that such kidneys may be more viable than previously thought, and should be considered to meet the growing demand for organ transplants.

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Surgery Not Preferable for Broken Shoulders

March 10, 2015 1:26 pm | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

Among patients with a displaced fracture in the upper arm near the shoulder (proximal humeral), there was no significant difference between surgical treatment and nonsurgical treatment in patient-reported outcomes over two years following the fracture.

Improving Pain Management Practices

March 10, 2015 1:00 pm | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Articles | Comments

A look at how new pharmaceutical developments could help improve patient comfort and post-operative results.

JAMA Viewpoint: Young African American Men Left Out

March 9, 2015 1:06 pm | by Boston University Medical Center | Articles | Comments

Healthcare spending is at an all-time high in the U.S., yet young African-American men see little benefit, according to Boston Medical Center (BMC) researchers' Viewpoint commentary published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Have a Sense of Purpose in Life? It May Protect Your Heart

March 9, 2015 12:55 pm | by The Mount Sinai Hospital | News | Comments

Having a high sense of purpose in life may lower your risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a new study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt and presented on March 6 at the American Heart Association's EPI/Lifestyle 2015 Scientific Sessions in Baltimore.

The Little Things That Kill … And Cure

March 6, 2015 1:17 pm | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Articles | Comments

Some strong insight on how sticking to the basics of infection prevention can protect surgical staff and patients from the effects of HAIs.

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Being Proactive Key in Patient Prep

March 5, 2015 1:10 pm | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Articles | Comments

Surgical Products recently sat down with Vicki Allen, MSN, RN, and asked her about best practices in avoiding common patient prep mistakes.

Botox Could Improve Smiles in Children with Facial Paralysis

March 5, 2015 1:05 pm | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

Injecting Botox appears to be a safe procedure to improve smiles by restoring lip symmetry in children with facial paralysis.

Superbug Infections Hit Another Los Angeles Hospital

March 5, 2015 12:55 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A second Los Angeles hospital is reporting that patients have been infected with an antibiotic-resistant superbug linked to a type of widely used medical scope.

Right Ways to Avoid Wrong Site Events

March 4, 2015 1:20 pm | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Articles | Comments

Industry experts weigh in on the best, and often most simple ways to avoid the tragic results of a wrong-site surgery.

Questioning Sedative Use During General Anesthesia

March 4, 2015 12:38 pm | by The JAMA Network Journals | News | Comments

A randomized trial suggests that the use of sedatives did not improve patient experiences the day after surgery, and could be associated with the need for a breathing tube to be left in for longer periods of time, as well as slower rates of cognitive recovery.

Less Invasive Procedure Aids Infants with Head Shape Abnormalities

March 3, 2015 12:58 pm | by Wolters Kluwer Health | News | Comments

A new approach means more than three-fourths of infants with skull flattening related to sleep position can achieve a normal head shape without the need for helmet therapy.

Nurse Who Survived Ebola Sues Dallas Hospital System

March 3, 2015 12:33 pm | by Jamie Stengle, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Dallas hospital that treated the first patient to be diagnosed in the U.S. with Ebola lied to Congress when it said its staff was trained to handle the deadly virus, a nurse who contracted the disease contends in a lawsuit filed Monday.

Arrested 'Body Sculptor' Says Clients Chose Her Over Surgeons

March 2, 2015 11:56 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

An aspiring hip-hop artist who boasts about her talent for underground "body sculpting" has one last chance to impress a jury before the panel weighs murder charges against her in a dancer's death.

Overcoming Obstacles to Surgical Plume Evacuation: What’s Stopping You?

March 2, 2015 11:35 am | by Buffalo Filter | Articles | Comments

A New Continuing Nursing Education Activity Sponsored by Buffalo Filter.

Study: Many Transplant Surgeons Suffer Burnout

February 27, 2015 12:47 pm | by Henry Ford Health System | News | Comments

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40 percent feel emotionally exhausted, according to a national study on transplant surgeon burnout.

New Council Formed to Reduce Surgical Plume

February 27, 2015 12:05 pm | by International Council on Surgical Plume | News | Comments

A new non-profit council has recently formed with a mission to finally rid the world’s operating environments of surgical smoke plume once and for all.

Call for Study on Anesthesia's Potential Risk to Babies

February 26, 2015 1:47 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Studies of baby animals have long suggested that going under anesthesia can have some harmful effects on a developing brain. Now some scientists want to find out whether those same drugs may pose subtle risks for human babies and toddlers.

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