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Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Study IDs Surgical Patients At Risk

April 22, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. A study is helping physicians better identify patients most at risk, the first step toward preventing this dangerous and costly surgical complication...

Gene Variant Raises Risk For Aortic Tear And Rupture

April 21, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

Researchers from Yale School of Medicine and Celera Diagnostics have confirmed the significance of a genetic variant that substantially increases the risk of a frequently fatal thoracic aortic dissection or full rupture. Thoracic aortic aneurysms, or bulges in the artery wall, can develop without pain or other symptoms. If they lead to a tear — dissection — or full rupture, the patient will often die without immediate treatment...

Kids Get Codeine In ER Despite Risks

April 21, 2014 9:58 am | by Lindsey Tanner, AP Medical Writer | Articles | Comments

Use of the drug in that setting is hardly rampant — just 3 percent of kids' ER visits resulted in a codeine prescription in 2010, the 10-year study found. But with more than 25 million ER visits by children each year, the authors say far too many kids are getting the drug when better options are available...

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Study Identifies New Cause Of Brain Bleeding Immediately After Stroke

April 18, 2014 8:25 am | News | Comments

By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage...

FDA Warns Of Cancer Risk With Fibroid Procedure

April 18, 2014 7:02 am | by Matthew Perrone, AP Health Writer | Articles | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration is warning women that a surgical procedure used to eliminate growths in the uterus could inadvertently spread cancer to other parts of the body. The agency is discouraging doctors from performing the procedure, which uses an electronic device to grind and shred uterine tissue so it can be removed through a small incision in the abdomen...

Ex-Radiology Tech Filed False Mammogram Results

April 16, 2014 9:58 am | News | Comments

An ex-radiology technician accused of filing inaccurate mammogram results at a Georgia hospital has pleaded guilty to 10 counts of reckless conduct and a charge of computer forgery. Prosecutors have said 33-year-old Rachael Michelle Rapraeger, of Macon, entered nearly 1,300 negative mammogram results at Perry Hospital between Jan. 22, 2009 and April 1, 2010 that hadn't been reviewed by a radiologist...

Antibiotics Alone Are A Successful Treatment For Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis In Kids

April 15, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

Using antibiotics alone to treat children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis is a reasonable alternative to surgery that leads to less pain and fewer missed school days, according to a pilot study. The research is the first prospective study on nonoperative management of acute appendicitis in pediatric patients in the United States...

Why So Many Americans Believe In Healthcare Conspiracy Theories

April 12, 2014 11:03 pm | by Deceased, M.D. | Blogs | Comments

That old phrase, “Just because you’re paranoid does not mean that you’re crazy,” came to mind. I don’t think any amount of medical education would convince these people otherwise. Simply because the fundamental flaw in their thinking is based on trust not on logic. And it does not take a genius to realize that there are all kinds of reasons not to trust medical care these days...

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Spike In Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Deaths May Be Linked To 30-Day Survival Measurement

April 10, 2014 10:07 am | News | Comments

Analyzing a national database of hospital inpatient records, a team of researchers reports an expected spike in mortality six days after cardiac surgery, but also a more surprising and potentially troubling jump in deaths at the 30-day mark...

Adenoma Detection Rates Linked To Colorectal Cancer And Mortality

April 8, 2014 10:29 am | News | Comments

A study of over 224,000 patients and more than 314,000 colonoscopies found that adenoma detection rates closely tracked the future risk of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopies screen for colorectal cancer by detecting early, curable cancers. Precancerous adenomas — a type of colon polyp — can also be detected and removed, thereby preventing cancers from developing...

Mercury Rising: Temperature Management Roundtable

April 8, 2014 10:05 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

Experts from four companies that provide temperature management products discuss the technology that allows clinicians to keep themselves and their patients safe and comfortable...                      

Point Of Impact: Talking Sharps Safety And Needlestick Prevention

April 7, 2014 9:47 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

The numbers don’t lie. The sharps injury rate in surgical settings has increased in the 14 years since the passage of the federal Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000. While the rate of injury has dropped approximately 31.6 percent in non-surgical settings, it has increased about 6.5 percent in the operating room. Why?

ER Doctors Commonly Miss More Strokes Among Women, Minorities, And Younger Patients

April 4, 2014 8:57 am | News | Comments

Analyzing federal healthcare data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches...

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Study: More Than Half Of High-Risk Alcohol Users Report Improvement After Surgery

April 4, 2014 8:52 am | News | Comments

Much has been reported about the potential for increased risk of alcohol misuse after weight loss surgery (WLS), with most theories pointing to lower alcohol tolerance and a longer time to return to a sober state after surgery, but a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests that upwards of half of high-risk drinkers are actually less likely to report high-risk drinking behavior after weight loss surgery...

Transplant Drugs May Help Wipe Out Persistent HIV Infections

April 3, 2014 10:08 am | News | Comments

New research suggests that drugs commonly used to prevent organ rejection after transplantation may also be helpful for combating HIV. The findings suggest a new strategy in the fight against HIV and AIDS...          

Test Accurately Rules Out Heart Attacks In The ER

April 3, 2014 9:58 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | Articles | Comments

A simple test appears very good at ruling out heart attacks in people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, a big public health issue and a huge worry for patients. A large study in Sweden found that the blood test plus the usual electrocardiogram of the heartbeat were 99 percent accurate at showing which patients could safely be sent home rather than be admitted for observation and more diagnostics...

Survey Shows Spine Surgeons Need To Screen More Patients For Anxiety And Depression

April 2, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

In a recent report, a Johns Hopkins team says that only 10 percent of orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons follow professional guidelines recommending routine psychological screenings of patients prior to major surgery for severe back and leg pain. The oversight, researchers say, may pose a serious risk to patients' surgical recovery...

Like Hand-Washing, Blood Transfusions Linked To Infections

April 2, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

"Many people are beginning to accept that we can make a difference – despite being taught in medical school that blood transfusions 'might help and can't hurt,' " Neil Blumberg, M.D., professor at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry said. "What we've found is actually the opposite, that it can hurt and it rarely helps..."

Mayo Clinic Study Examines Physician Burnout

April 2, 2014 9:56 am | by Mayo Clinic | Videos | Comments

Researchers at Mayo Clinic looked at 54 burnout studies worldwide to see if there is any validity to the longstanding belief that practicing in the hospital incites greater burnout. The studies included data from approximately 5,000 outpatient physicians and more than 1,300 inpatient physicians...

Low-Cost Dominican Surgeries Spark Warnings By U.S.

April 2, 2014 9:50 am | by Ben Fox and Ezequiel Abiu Lopez, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control issued an alert March 7 after health authorities in the United States reported that at least 19 women in five states had developed serious mycobacterial wound infections over the previous 12 months following cosmetic procedures in the Dominican Republic such as liposuction, tummy tucks, and breast implants...

Clemson Researcher Touts Surgical Safety Checklist To Save Lives

March 28, 2014 1:00 pm | by Clemson University | News | Comments

Clemson University research assistant professor Ashley Kay Childers has been selected to participate in a forum to discuss quality improvement programs in U.S. hospitals that reduce preventable readmissions, prevent medical errors, improve patient outcomes, and cut costs...

VisiClear Surgical Smoke Plume Evacuator

March 28, 2014 12:46 pm | by Buffalo Filter | Buffalo Filter | Product Releases | Comments

Buffalo Filter is pleased to announce the VisiClear Surgical Smoke Plume Evacuator. VisiClear offers the latest in technology, resulting in a quiet, safe, and intuitive surgical smoke plume evacuator.

Hospital Ratings Show Likelihood Of Quality Care All Over The Map

March 28, 2014 10:34 am | by CBS News | Videos | Comments

The latest research from Consumer Reports finds that some hospitals in the United States are much better than others at avoiding mistakes that put patients at risk...                           

Anti-Clotting Agent Helps Reduce The Incidence And Impact Of Stent Thrombosis During PCI

March 28, 2014 10:07 am | News | Comments

CHAMPION PHOENIX was a prospective, double-blind, active-controlled trial which randomized 11,145 patients to receive intravenous cangrelor or oral clopidogrel administered at the time of PCI. In a previous analysis presented at TCT 2013 and published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, cangrelor significantly reduced periprocedural and 30-day ischemic events in patients undergoing PCI...

Humbles TrenWrap For Trendelenburg Positioning

March 27, 2014 10:27 am | by Innovative Medical Products | Innovative Medical Products, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Innovative Medical Products has announced the Humbles TrenWrap -- a new positioning pad system with two unique features that will securely anchor a patient prior to positioning in Trendelenburg and reverse Trendelenburg for robotic and laparoscopic surgeries. First, the system’s Pre-Load Rail Clamps secure the straps of the positioning base pad, locking the pad tightly in position to the OR table’s side rails.

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