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Four Reasons Why Hospitals Can Be Very Dangerous Places To Be

February 4, 2014 9:32 am | by Robert Pearl, M.D. | Blogs | Comments

A hospital can be a very dangerous place to be. Here are four frightening risks hospitals pose, along with their causes and some easy-to-implement solutions that could save hundreds of thousands of lives each year...       

Risk Of Death When Waiting For A Heart Varies Widely

February 3, 2014 10:24 am | by Salynn Boyles | Articles | Comments

The risk of dying within 90 days of being placed on a heart transplant wait-list was 10 times greater for patients with the most risk factors compared with those with the fewest, suggesting a need for revising the current heart allocation system, researchers found...

What Is A High Risk Patient?

February 3, 2014 9:40 am | by Fred N. Pelzman, M.D. | Blogs | Comments

Under the current patient-centered medical home paradigm, being labeled a high-risk patient is an advantage. Lots of resources will be poured into your care. People will be calling you at home all the time, helping make sure you take your medicines, get your tests done, see your specialists, come back for follow-up. But who would want to be labeled high risk?

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Automated System Could Efficiently Identify High-Risk Osteoporosis Patients

January 29, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

An automated system that identifies high-risk osteoporosis patients being treated for fractures and can generate letters encouraging follow-up is an effective way to promote osteoporosis intervention and prevent future fractures, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers...

Research: Voice May Change After Rhinoplasty

January 29, 2014 10:41 am | News | Comments

Patients who have undergone plastic surgery to change the appearance of their nose may also notice changes in the sound of their voice, reports a study. Changes in voice after rhinoplasty are perceptible to patients as well as to experts, but generally don't cause problems with speech function, according to the new research...

Good Outcomes With Staged Surgery For Epilepsy In Children

January 28, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

"Staged epilepsy surgery with invasive electrode monitoring is safe in children with poorly localized medically refractory epilepsy," write Drs. Jonathan Roth and Howard Weiner of NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City, New York. Their 13-year review suggests that complication rates decrease further as surgeons gain experience with staged epilepsy surgery...

Johns Hopkins Study: Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries On The Rise In U.S.

January 28, 2014 9:55 am | News | Comments

The number of serious traumatic spinal cord injuries is on the rise in the United States, and the leading cause no longer appears to be motor vehicle crashes, but falls, new Johns Hopkins research suggests. The same research shows, moreover, that rates of these injuries are rising fastest among older people, suggesting that efforts to prevent falls in the elderly could significantly curb the number of spinal injuries...

E-Z Clean PRECISION Blade

January 27, 2014 10:04 am | by Megadyne Medical Products | Megadyne Medical Products, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Megadyne Medical Products unveiled the new E-Z Clean PRECISION electrodes. The innovative design features a smaller blade width than standard electrosurgical tips allowing for reduced power settings and increased control to maneuver in small spaces, with minimal risk of collateral tissue damage. The EZ-Clean PRECISION Blades expand Megadyne’s offering of specialty electrodes for precise cases. The non-stick PTFE coating decreases eschar build-up, reducing smoke and allowing surgeons to achieve consistent cutting and coagulation.

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New Guidelines For Healthcare Personnel Attire Are Short On Evidence

January 27, 2014 9:00 am | by Skeptical Scalpel | Blogs | Comments

If I could ask the well-meaning folks at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America one question, it would be, "Why issue guidelines if you have no evidence to base them on?"              

Seattle Children's Hospital Investigated Over Dirty Instruments

January 24, 2014 9:49 am | by ABC News | Videos | Comments

Scopes used during colonoscopies were found to have been cleaned improperly at Seattle Children's Hospital. As a result of the oversight, approximately 100 children are at risk. Following an investigation by the hospital, a lapse in the facility's cleaning process was discovered...

Study Finds A Decline In Adverse Events For Heart Attack, Heart Failure Patients

January 24, 2014 9:28 am | News | Comments

Adverse events for patients being treated for heart attack and heart failure have declined, according to a new study. However, the analysis funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) found that there has not been a significant decrease in adverse events for patients being treated for pneumonia and those who are recovering from surgery...

Big Changes To Heart Devices OK'd Without New Data

January 23, 2014 11:39 am | by Todd Neale | News | Comments

Many of the high-risk implantable cardiac devices in use today were approved through a supplement pathway that does not require new clinical data on the safety and effectiveness of changes made to the products since their original approval, a review of an agency database showed...

Robotic Surgical Incident Reporting Leads To More Questions Than Answers

January 22, 2014 10:40 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Blogs | Comments

Some questions simply lead to more questions. No questions lead to definitive answers without data and evidence leading the way. That thought came into my mind when I read a recent San Francisco Chronicle article about adverse-event reporting in healthcare, specifically as it relates to Intuitive Surgical’s da Vinci robotic surgery system...

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Study: 'Icy' Technique Improves Robotic Kidney Transplants

January 22, 2014 10:04 am | News | Comments

A collaboration of surgeons at Henry Ford Hospital and Medanta Hospital in India successfully transplanted kidneys into 50 recipients using an innovative robot-assisted procedure in which the organ is cooled with sterile ice during the operation. The research project advances minimally invasive robotic surgery as a safe alternative to traditional open surgery...

Many CV Devices Approved By Process That Often Does Not Require New Clinical Data

January 22, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

Many cardiac implantable electronic device models currently in use were approved via a Food and Drug Administration review process in which the models were assumed safe and effective based on approval of prior versions of the device, according to a study...

Few Complications With Bedside Tracheotomy

January 21, 2014 10:14 am | by Ed Susman | News | Comments

Bedside percutaneous tracheotomy can be done in critically ill patients with a low risk of morbidity in the community hospital setting, researchers said here. Among 41 intensive care unit (ICU) patients who underwent the procedure, there was a 2 percent complication rate and no procedure-related death...

Study: Tonsillectomy Procedures Vary Depending On Hospital

January 21, 2014 9:43 am | by Michelle Castillo | Articles | Comments

Getting a tonsillectomy can vary depending on where you get the procedure done, a new study reveals. The research looked at 36 children’s hospitals that performed the procedure on almost 140,000 kids. They found that the facilities provided different levels of antibiotics and the steroid dexamethasone...

Floor Signs

January 20, 2014 4:32 am | by Healthmark Industries | Healthmark Industries Company, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Healthmark now offers floor signs made with durable strength and long lasting adhesive. These UV protected industrial laminate materials are high-impact floor signs will last up to seven years without losing their top-layer traction or their color. Floor signs have clear printing and high visibility. They are very easy to use, just peel and stick to the desired location.

Halted After Deaths, Kids' Heart Surgeries Resume At Kentucky Hospital

January 20, 2014 3:40 am | by Elizabeth Cohen | Articles | Comments

Shortly after the fifth death in 2012, Kentucky Children's decided to stop its heart surgeries and placed its only pediatric heart surgeon But now, pediatric heart surgeries are resuming there -- without any reported investigation by the state health department and without oversight by anyone...

The Friday Four: Surgeon Accused Of Leaving Heart Operation Early

January 17, 2014 10:41 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Blogs | Comments

The Friday Four seeks to highlight some of the people behind some of the interesting stories I stumble upon during my daily search for relevant content. I'm not going to lie to you. This is not the most uplifting edition in The Friday Four's brief (BUT ILLUSTRIOUS) history...

Chronic Intestinal Damage Raises Hip-Fracture Rate In Celiac Disease Patients

January 17, 2014 9:23 am | News | Comments

Celiac disease patients who experience chronic damage in the small intestine may be more likely to break a hip than those whose intestinal tissues have begun healing, according to new research. Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects about 1 percent of the U.S. population...

U.S. Emergency Care System Gets 'D+' In New Report

January 17, 2014 9:16 am | Articles | Comments

People seeking urgent medical care could face longer wait times and other challenges as demand increases under Obamacare, U.S. emergency doctors said in a report that gives the nation's emergency infrastructure a near failing grade. In its latest "report card," the American College of Emergency Physicians said such reduced access earned the nation a "D+" - that's down from the overall "C-" grade from the group's last report in 2009...

Study: Most Practice Guideline Recommendations Based On Less-Than-Ideal Quality of Evidence

January 16, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

A recent study shows that most clinical practice guidelines for interventional procedures (e.g., bronchoscopy, angioplasty) are based on lower-quality medical evidence and fail to disclose authors’ conflicts of interest...

Does Taking Multiple Medicines Increase Your Risk Of Being Admitted To Hospital?

January 16, 2014 10:23 am | News | Comments

Patients with a single illness who take many drugs have an increased risk of being admitted to hospital, but for patients with multiple conditions, taking many medicines is now associated with a near-normal risk of admission...     

Study: CT Scans Could Bolster Forensic Database To ID Unidentified Remains

January 15, 2014 10:06 am | News | Comments

A study from North Carolina State University finds that data from CT scans can be incorporated into a growing forensic database to help determine the ancestry and sex of unidentified remains. The finding may also have clinical applications for craniofacial surgeons...

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