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Pain Killers

March 3, 2014 10:02 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

Improving patient outcomes, decreasing hospital length-of-stay, and reducing costs are tasks best classified as perennially unfinished by hospitals. Any chance to make improvements must be considered, including evaluating the use of opioid use for perioperative pain management. Furthermore, recent research and anecdotal evidence point to several potential benefits of reducing the use of opioids in healthcare settings...

Study: Robotic-Assisted Prostate Surgery Offers Better Cancer Control

March 3, 2014 9:15 am | News | Comments

An observational study from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that prostate cancer patients who undergo robotic-assisted prostate surgery have fewer instances of cancer cells at the edge of their surgical specimen and less need for additional cancer treatments like hormone or radiation therapy than patients who have traditional "open" surgery...

Antidote Can Deactivate New Form Of Heparin

February 27, 2014 10:38 am | News | Comments

Low-molecular-weight heparin is commonly used in surgeries to prevent dangerous blood clots. But when patients experience the other extreme – uncontrolled bleeding – in response to low-molecular-weight heparin, there is no antidote. Now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a synthetic form of low-molecular-weight heparin that can be reversed if things go wrong...

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Pulling Problem Teeth Before Heart Surgery To Prevent Infection May Be Catch-22

February 27, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

To pull or not to pull? A Mayo Clinic study found that roughly 1 in 10 heart surgery patients who had troublesome teeth extracted before surgery died or had adverse outcomes such as a stroke or kidney failure...       

Exercise, Surgically Removing Belly Fat Improves Cognition In Obese, Diabetic Mice

February 26, 2014 9:30 am | News | Comments

Cognitive decline that often accompanies obesity and diabetes can be reversed with regular exercise or surgical removal of belly fat, scientists report. A drug already used to treat rheumatoid arthritis also helps obese/diabetic adult mice regain their ability to learn and comprehend, while transplanting belly fat to a normal mouse reduces those abilities...

Ovary Removal Cuts Cancer Risk In Women As Young As 35

February 25, 2014 5:23 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

For women who carry a notorious cancer gene, surgery to remove healthy ovaries is one of the most protective steps they can take. New research suggests some may benefit most from having the operation as young as 35...        

Children's Mercy Physician Leads Effort To Update AAP Policy

February 24, 2014 11:06 am | News | Comments

With less than half of medications including specific labeling for children, Kathleen Neville, MD, MS, a physician at Children's Mercy Hospital, recently led an American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) committee in updating the policy with new recommendations guiding the off-label use of drugs in pediatric patients. The policy statement, "Off-Label Use of Drugs in Children," was published recently. 

New C-Section Guidelines Urge Longer Wait Before Opting For Surgery

February 21, 2014 9:38 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Show more patience in the delivery room: That's the prescription being given to the nation's obstetricians. New guidelines say doctors should give otherwise healthy women more time to deliver their babies vaginally before assuming that labor has stalled. The recommendations are the latest in years of efforts to prevent unnecessary C-sections...

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Study: More Women Receiving Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

February 20, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

A new study finds that the majority of women who undergo mastectomy for breast cancer go on to get breast reconstruction, a practice that has increased dramatically over time. Researchers found that 46 percent of patients received reconstruction in 1998 but that figure rose to 63 percent by 2007...

Stents, Surgery Equal For Blocked Carotids

February 20, 2014 11:04 am | by Todd Neale | Articles | Comments

For patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, stenting and endarterectomy appear to be equally effective for preventing ipsilateral stroke over the long term, a small, single-center trial suggested...    

One-Quarter Of High Risk Patients Denied Anticoagulation After AF Ablation

February 19, 2014 7:04 am | News | Comments

The EORP Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study, conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), reveals that 65 percent of patients were taking anticoagulants one year after ablation of AF.1 But up to 25 percent of patients at high risk of stroke (defined as a CHA2DS2-VASc score >1) were not taking any anticoagulant drug...

Study: Blood Test Serves As 'Crystal Ball' For Heart Transplant Patients

February 19, 2014 6:55 am | News | Comments

A new UCLA-led study shows that a blood test commonly used to determine whether heart transplant recipients are rejecting their new organ can also predict potential rejection-related problems in the future...         

FaceGuard Head Shield/Instrument Trays

February 18, 2014 10:45 am | by Dan Allen Surgical | Product Releases | Comments

Dan Allen Surgical introduces FaceGuard Head Shield/Instrument Trays. The table-mounted device offers a number of innovative patient safety and user-friendly features.

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Researchers Developing Technology To Link Patient Records Between Hospitals, Medical Flight Crews

February 18, 2014 9:55 am | News | Comments

Although trauma, heart, and stroke patients benefit from being transferred from a local hospital to a higher-level care facility, it’s unclear why patients transferred with non-urgent medical conditions show at least a 30 percent higher death rate than had they stayed put, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University’s nursing school...

Antibiotics Instead Of Surgery For Appendicitis? No Way

February 18, 2014 9:16 am | by Skeptical Scalpel | Blogs | Comments

A retrospective study from California claims that the nonoperative management of simple appendicitis may be safe and is worth studying further. Why am I not convinced? Because every time this subject comes up, the paper purporting to show that antibiotics are superior or even equal to surgical treatment is flawed...

ECO-BEDSIDE KIT

February 14, 2014 2:21 pm | by Ruhof | Ruhof Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Ruhof's ECO-BEDSIDE KIT is the only eco-friendly kit on the market that removes synthetic lipids from scope surfaces and internal channels. The product is safe on all scopes and easy to use with a wide mouthed tray design and securely fitting lid, which prevents spillage of enzymatic solution during preparation and suctioning.

Kidney Transplant: Donors May Risk ESRD

February 14, 2014 2:15 pm | by Kristina Fiore | News | Comments

People who donate one of their kidneys have an increased risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD), although the overall magnitude of that risk is small, researchers found...          

FDA Rejects Wider Use Of J&J Xarelto For Third Time

February 14, 2014 1:56 pm | News | Comments

Johnson & Johnson said Friday that the Food and Drug Administration has rejected — for a third time — its application to expand use of the blood thinner Xarelto to reduce dangerous blood clots and related problems in patients with coronary artery disease...

WRONG SITE Sleeve

February 14, 2014 7:08 am | by Patient Safety Gear, Inc. | Patient Safety Gear, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The WRONG SITE sleeve from Patient Safety Gear, Inc. provides extra protection for patients undergoing surgery. After marking the surgical site pre-operatively with a skin marker, the WRONG SITE sleeve is placed on the patient’s “wrong limb” to avoid any mistakes once the patient is taken to the OR.

Most People Have Access To Stroke Care, But Few Get Recommended Treatment

February 13, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

Four out of five people in the United States live within an hour's drive of a hospital equipped to treat acute stroke — yet very few get recommended treatment, according to recent research...              

NYC Hospitals’ Dialysis Plan Is Under New Scrutiny

February 13, 2014 8:56 am | by Nina Bernstein | Articles | Comments

The New York State Public Health and Health Planning Council is set to vote Thursday on a deal to turn over dialysis at four of New York City’s public hospitals to a for-profit franchise called Big Apple Dialysis despite government data showing the company’s centers did not perform as well as the hospitals themselves...

Hospital To 18 Patients: You May Have Been Exposed To Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

February 11, 2014 9:43 am | News | Comments

Doctors and hospital officials from Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, are notifying 18 neurosurgery patients that they might have been exposed to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a serious and incurable neurological disorder...

Same Cancer Risk With Two Breast Atypias

February 10, 2014 11:36 am | by Charles Bankhead | News | Comments

Both atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) conferred an identical risk of breast cancer in the same (ipsilateral) breast, and both types of atypia had a 2:1 ratio for the risk of ipsilateral versus contralateral (opposite) breast cancer...

Smoke Alarm

February 10, 2014 11:31 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

The healthcare industry’s stance on surgical smoke in the operating room has evolved considerably over the course of the past several years. As more information came out about the potential dangers of surgical smoke in the operating room, the healthcare industry responded by actively seeking out and implementing products and solutions to address those possible threats... 

EHR-Based Screening Program For AAA Cuts The Number Of At-Risk Men By More Than Half

February 10, 2014 11:02 am | News | Comments

A screening program for abdominal aortic aneurysms, integrated into an electronic health record, dramatically reduced the number of unscreened at-risk men by more than 50 percent within 15 months, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today...

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